Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Canonical Ltd Launches Global Partner Programme for Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical Ltd, the commercial sponsor of Ubuntu, today announced its newly created Partner Programme to drive awareness and adoption of business-ready, Open Source server platforms, and desktop solutions. The Programme aims to help Canonical Partners using Ubuntu as a major element in their solutions, and to deepen Canonical's relationships with leading IHV, ISVs, Resellers, System Builders/OEMs and Training Partners.

"Ubuntu is increasingly being specified and used as the base for delivering high-performance solutions that substantially reduce Total Cost of Ownership for businesses. The new Canonical Partner Programme sets out to enable a wide range of partners, and provide them with advice and tools that ensure they can deliver high quality, cost-effective and flexible alternatives to expensive proprietary platforms", said Malcolm Yates, ISV and Partner Manager at Canonical Ltd.

Entry into the Partner Programme depends on the size, skills and experience of the partner company, the level of business commitment and their technology. There are five separate tracks in the Partner Programme:

1. Software Partners
Applications are tested and certified on Ubuntu and offer support customers who deploy the product on Ubuntu.

2. Hardware Partners
Manufacturer of storage adaptors, network cards, video cards or peripherals such as printers or hard drives, Hardware Partners should have drivers and support available for Ubuntu.

3. System Builder/OEM Partners
Ship non-Windows PCs with the Ubuntu Desktop Edition and offer Ubuntu Server Edition, and provide support to customers running Ubuntu on these systems.

4. Solution Provider Partners
Demonstrate significant experience with selling, installing and supporting Ubuntu-based solutions.

5. Training Partners
Have a proven record of delivering education, and the facilities and staff to continue to build on this record.

To recognise performance and success, each track has three levels of participation (excluding Training Partner): Gold, Silver and Affiliate.

Gold Partners will be involved in engineering, support and marketing collaboration. These partnerships require higher revenue and support commitments, but benefit from a much more strategic relationship with Canonical, and involvement with Canonical's business processes and strategies.

Silver Partners will have met requirements set out by Canonical, demonstrating a definite commitment to promoting and developing open source technologies within their customer base, and to building joint business with Canonical. These partners will receive additional marketing assistance, and are eligible for technical support at reduced prices.

Affiliate Partner is the entry level into the Programme. Affiliate Partners will have access to many services provided by Canonical from technical support to marketing and communications. The entry requirements are set to enable most Ubuntu and open source focussed businesses join at this level. This is also the standard participation level for all Training Partners.

For more information on the Canonical Partner Programme visit www.ubuntu.com/partners. Partners wishing to join the Programme should go to www.ubuntu.com/partners/become and register their interest.

As an alternative to the more strictly managed Partner Programme, Canonical also offers the Canonical Marketplace (www.ubuntu.com/support/commercial/marketplace). Listing within the Marketplace is free to all businesses and individuals who work with Ubuntu, whether they provide local support to their clients, or provide large scale consultancy across regions and countries.

Ubuntu is open source software, costs nothing to download, and users are free to customise or alter their software in order to meet their needs. The Desktop Edition can be deployed as a general-purpose workstation, thin client, or engineering workstation. The Server Edition provides a well integrated platform and simplifies the deployment process of new servers with any of the standard Internet services such as e-mail, web, file serving and database management.

About Canonical and Ubuntu Canonical, the commercial sponsor of Ubuntu, is a global organisation headquartered in Europe committed to the development, distribution and support of open source software products and communities. World-class 24x7 commercial support for Ubuntu is available through Canonical's global support team and partners. Since its launch in October 2004 Ubuntu has become one of the most highly regarded Linux distributions with millions of users around the world. Ubuntu will always be free to download, free to use and free to distribute to others. With these goals in mind, Ubuntu aims to be the most widely used Linux system, and is the centre of a global open source software ecosystem.

Download Ubuntu from www.ubuntu.com/download. To learn about commercial support for Ubuntu, Kubuntu and Edubuntu, please see www.canonical.com/support. For more information visit www.canonical.com or www.ubuntu.com.

Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Edubuntu and their associated logos are all registered trademarks of Canonical Ltd.

###

More in Tux Machines

GNU/Linux on the Desktop Versus Proprietary Forms

  • Why I use a Mac computer, but an Android phone
    Yes, you could use a flavour of Linux on cheaper hardware, but then you trade the great Mac graphical interface with the ones available to Linux. You can fight me in the comments, but deep down you know I’m right. MacOS comes with Bash, and many of the tools those familiar with Linux would expect to have by default in their favourite distribution, including basics like “whois”, which aren’t installed in Windows by default.
  • Everything you knew about Chromebooks is wrong
    The original assumed vision of the Chromebook platform was a laptop and operating system capable of running only the Chrome web browser. You could do anything you wanted, as long as you wanted to stay on the web at all times. Today, the best new Chromebooks can runs apps from three additional operating systems. Not only do Chromebooks run apps, but they run more apps without dual- or multi-booting than any other computing platform. Chromebooks can run apps from Android, Linux and Windows concurrently in the same session.
  • Games, Tests and GitLab CI
    We are getting midterm of the GNOME 3.30 development cycle and many things already happened in the Games world. I will spare the user facing news for later as today I want to tell you about development features we desperatly needed as maintainers: tests and continuous integration. TL;DR: GLib, Meson, Flatpak and GitLab CI make writing and running tests super easy!

Graphics: Vulkan and Vega M

  • Vulkan Virgl Has Kicked Off For Supporting This Graphics/Compute API Within VMs
    Of the hundreds of projects for this year's Google Summer of Code, there are many interesting GSoC 2018 projects but one of those that I am most excited for is Vulkan-Virgl for getting this modern API supported with hardware acceleration by guest virtual machines. As implied by the name, this effort is based upon the Virgl project started by David Airlie and originally tasked with getting OpenGL acceleration to guest VMs using a fully open-source Linux driver stack. Virgl has been in good shape for a while now with OpenGL, while this summer the hope is to get the Vulkan API support going for opening up VMs to using this high-performance graphics and compute API.
  • AMDVLK Driver Lands Half-Float Additions, Many Other Improvements
    There's been another weekly-ish public code push to the AMDVLK open-source AMD Vulkan Linux driver stack and this time around it's heavy on feature work. There has been a fair amount of changes pertaining to half-float (FP16) support including support for the AMD_gpu_shader_half_float extension, prepping for VK_AMD_gpu_shader_half_float_fetch, FP16 interpolation intrinsics and register settings, and more.
  • Vega M Graphics On Intel Kabylake G CPUs Are Beginning To Work Under Linux
    We have been covering the Linux driver upbringing of "Vega M" for the Vega/Polaris graphics found in select newer Intel "Kabylake G" processors. The code is still in flight before it will work in all released versions of the Linux driver components, but for those willing to build the code or rely upon third party repositories, Vega M is now working on Linux. As I have covered in various past articles, the open-source driver support for Radeon Vega M is queued into DRM-Next for the upcoming Linux 4.18 kernel cycle, Mesa 18.1 albeit with new hardware I always recommend using the latest Git (current Mesa 18.2), and there are also binary GPU microcode files needed too.

Plasma 5.13 – Amazing Tux, How Sweet Plasma

Plasma 5.13 is (going to be) a very nice release. It builds on the solid foundation that is the LTS edition, and adds cool, smart touches. The emphasis is on seamless integration of elements, which is what separates professionals from amateurs. It’s all around how the WHOLE desktop behaves, and not individual programs in isolation. And Plasma is making great strides, offering a polished version of an already mature and handsome product, with extra focus on fonts, media and browser connectivity and good performance. There are some rough patches. Apart from the obvious beta issues, those goes without saying, KDE Connect ought to be a true multi-phone product, the network stack really needs to be spotless, and that means full Microsoft Windows inter-operability, Spectacle should allow for configurable shadows and alpha channel, and I want to see if the decorative backend has been cleaned up, i.e. can you search and install new themes and icons without encountering useless errors and inconsistencies. But all in all, I’m quite impressed. The changes are big and noticeable, and above all, meaningful. You don’t just get features for the sake of it, you get things that improve the quality and consistency of the desktop, that maximize fun and productivity, and there’s deep thought in orchestrating it all together. It ain’t just a random bunch of options that happen to work. I like seeing patterns in things, and I’m happy when there’s functional harmony. This spring season of distro testing hasn’t been fun, and Plasma 5.13 is balm for my weary wrists, so hurting from all that angry typing. More than worth a spin, and highly recommended. Full steam on, Tuxers. Read more Also: This week in Usability & Productivity, part 20

Sad News! Development Stopped for Korora and BackSlash Linux

It seems more and more small distributions are facing a had time. Recently we saw the crisis at Void Linux. Now we have two more small Linux distributions calling it quit, albeit temporarily. Read more