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today's howtos

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HowTos
  • How To Install Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla

    This tutorial explains Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla computer installation. You will prepare at least two disk partitions, finishing it all in about twenty minutes, and enjoy! Let's start right now.

  • How to install Ubuntu 20.10 - YouTube

    In this video, I am going to show how to install Ubuntu 20.10.

  • How To Install Webmin on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial we will show you how to install Webmin on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, as well as some extra required packages by Webmin control panel

  • Running Ironic Standalone on RHEL | Adam Young’s Web Log

    This is only going to work if you have access to the OpenStack code. If you are not an OpenStack customer, you are going to need an evaluation entitlement. That is beyond the scope of this article.

  • Introduction to Ironic

    The sheer number of projects and problem domains covered by OpenStack was overwhelming. I never learned several of the other projects under the big tent. One project that is getting relevant to my day job is Ironic, the bare metal provisioning service. Here are my notes from spelunking the code.

  • Adding Nodes to Ironic

    TheJulia was kind enough to update the docs for Ironic to show me how to include IPMI information when creating nodes.

  • Secure NTP with NTS

    Many computers use the Network Time Protocol (NTP) to synchronize their system clocks over the internet. NTP is one of the few unsecured internet protocols still in common use. An attacker that can observe network traffic between a client and server can feed the client with bogus data and, depending on the client’s implementation and configuration, force it to set its system clock to any time and date. Some programs and services might not work if the client’s system clock is not accurate. For example, a web browser will not work correctly if the web servers’ certificates appear to be expired according to the client’s system clock. Use Network Time Security (NTS) to secure NTP.

    Fedora 331 is the first Fedora release to support NTS. NTS is a new authentication mechanism for NTP. It enables clients to verify that the packets they receive from the server have not been modified while in transit. The only thing an attacker can do when NTS is enabled is drop or delay packets. See RFC8915 for further details about NTS.

    NTP can be secured well with symmetric keys. Unfortunately, the server has to have a different key for each client and the keys have to be securely distributed. That might be practical with a private server on a local network, but it does not scale to a public server with millions of clients.

    NTS includes a Key Establishment (NTS-KE) protocol that automatically creates the encryption keys used between the server and its clients. It uses Transport Layer Security (TLS) on TCP port 4460. It is designed to scale to very large numbers of clients with a minimal impact on accuracy. The server does not need to keep any client-specific state. It provides clients with cookies, which are encrypted and contain the keys needed to authenticate the NTP packets. Privacy is one of the goals of NTS. The client gets a new cookie with each server response, so it doesn’t have to reuse cookies. This prevents passive observers from tracking clients migrating between networks.

  • Comfortable Motion: Absolutely Cursed Vim Scrolling - YouTube

    Have you ever felt like Vim was too useful and thought hey let's change that, well that's what this dev thought and now we have a plugin called comfortable motion that's adds physics based scrolling into vim, what's physics based scrolling you ask. Well it's scrolling that occurs based on how long you hold down the scroll key.

  • Running Cassandra on Fedora 32 | Adam Young’s Web Log

    This is not a tutorial. These are my running notes from getting Cassandra to run on Fedora 32. The debugging steps are interesting in their own right. I’ll provide a summary at the end for any sane enough not to read through the rest.

  • Recovering Audio off an Old Tape Using Audacity | Adam Young’s Web Log

    One of my fiorends wrote a bunch of music back in high school. The only remainig recordings are on a casette tape that he produced. Time has not been kind to the recordings, but they are audible…barely. He has a device that produces MP3s from the tape. My job has been to try and get them so that we can understand them well enough to recover the original songs.

    I have the combined recording on a single MP3. I’ve gone through and noted the times where each song starts and stops. I am going to go through the steps I’ve been using to go from that single long MP3 to an individual recording.

  • Role of Training and Certification at the Linux Foundation

    Open source allows anyone to dip their toes in the code, read up on the documentation, and learn everything on their own. That’s how most of us did it, but that’s just the first step. Those who want to have successful careers in building, maintaining, and managing IT infrastructures of companies need more structured hands-on learning with real-life experience. That’s where Linux Foundation’s Training and Certification unit enters the picture. It helps not only greenhorn developers but also members of the ecosystem who seek highly trained and certified engineers to manage their infrastructure. Swapnil Bhartiya sat down with Clyde Seepersad, SVP and GM of Training and Certification at the Linux Foundation, to learn more about the Foundation’s efforts to create a generation of qualified professionals.

  • Hetzner build machine

    This is part of a series of posts on compiling a custom version of Qt5 in order to develop for both amd64 and a Raspberry Pi.

    Building Qt5 takes a long time. The build server I was using had CPUs and RAM, but was very slow on I/O. I was very frustrated by that, and I started evaluating alternatives. I ended up setting up scripts to automatically provision a throwaway cloud server at Hetzner.

More in Tux Machines

New Releases: EasyOS 2.5.1 and NuTyX 12-rc3

  • Easy Buster version 2.5.1

    EasyOS versions 1.x are the "Pyro" series, the latest is 1.3. Easy Pyro is built with packages compiled from source using 'oe-qky-src', a fork of OpenEmbedded. Consequently, the builds are small and streamlined and integrated. The Pyro series may have future releases, but it is considered to be in maintenance status. The "Buster" series start from version 2.0, and are intended to be where most of the action is, ongoing. Version 2.0 was really a beta-quality build, to allow the testers to report back. The first official release was 2.1. The main feature of Easy Buster is that it is built from Debian 10 Buster DEBs, using WoofQ (a fork of Woof2: Woof-CE is another fork, used to build Puppy Linux).

  • EasyOS 2.5.1
  • EasyPup 2.5 boots, 2.5.1 kernel panic

    Rodney has been reporting this for sometime, that he gets a kernel panic trying to boot recent releases of EasyOS or EasyPup. They are using a 5.4.x kernel, except for EasyPup 2.5, I used a 4.19.157 kernel, and that booted. He tried to upgrade to 2.5.1, got kernel panic. So, he is back on 2.5.

  • NuTyX 12-rc3 available

    I'm very please to announce the new NuTyX 12-rc3 testing release. The 64-bit version is a complete new project. They are no plan to release a version 12 of NuTyX in 32 bits.

Devices/Embedded: Raspberry Pi, Jetson Nano and STMicroelectronics/FreeRTOS

  • World’s first fingerprint sensor HAT uses capacitive scanning

    SB Components has won Kickstarter funding for a $60 “PiFinger” HAT for the Raspberry Pi featuring a 2D capacitive fingerprint sensor with 176 x 176 resolution that can detect, compare and register up to 24 fingerprints. UK-based SB Components, which has delivered ambitious, Raspberry Pi based products such as its PiTalk phone, LapPi laptop, and PiArm robotic arm, has weighed in with what it calls the world’s first fingerprint sensor HAT. The open source, $60 PiFinger has won Kickstarter funding and will ship in February.

  • 5 Best Raspberry Pi Alternatives to Run Linux On – buying guide [Ed: This list itself might be OK, but all the links are referrer spam and should be disregarded]
  • Spread the joy of learning through making
  • Designing the Raspberry Pi Case Fan
  • Compact Jetson Xavier NX/ Nano open hardware baseboard supports Android

    When it comes to NVIDIA Jetson family of modules, we should understand that NVIDIA Jetson Nano is for makers and STEM education, while Xavier NX is more geared towards professional and commercial use. The compute module Xavier NX was announced before the development kit, which includes the module and reference carrier board and otherwise for NVIDIA Jetson Nano. There are some third-party carrier boards & edge computers available for Jetson Xavier NX and Jetson Nano, including DesignCore Carrier Board and Diamond FLOYD Carrier Board. Antmicro, a custom hardware, software, and AI engineering company, came up with a compact open hardware device: Jetson Nano/ Xavier NX baseboard. It supports both NVIDIA Jetson Nano SoM as well as the Xavier NX SoM.

  • ST adds FreeRTOS thread-aware debug for microcontrollers

    STMicroelectronics has added support for FreeRTOS thread-aware debug to its STM32CubeIDE development environment, completing its acquisition of the Atollic tools. ST has completed transferring major advanced features of Atollic TrueStudio for STM32 into STM32CubeIDE after acquiring Atollic in 2017. STM32CubeIDE with support for thread-aware debug of the open source FreeRTOS real time operating system further extends the tool’s features. FreeRTOS is now supported by Amazon as AmazonFreeRTOS for the AWS cloud service. The direct access to STM32CubeMX configuration functions simplifies project setup, selecting a target microcontroller from the complete STM32 portfolio, configuring GPIOs, clock tree, peripherals, and pin assignments. The tool allows developers to quickly analyse power consumption depending on the applications usage, as well as select middleware stacks and generate initialization code for the desired configuration.

Open Hardware: Arduino and 64-bit RISC-V

  • Arduino Blog » RobotSculptor uses a six-axis robot arm to sculpt clay models

    Robotic fabrication techniques such as 3D printing enable you to make a copy of a wide variety of items. Actually sculpting something out of clay, however, remains a largely human pursuit. One might also miss the individual style of a sculptor in a finished product. RobotSculptor, developed by a team of engineers from ETH Zurich and Disney Research, attempts to address both challenges. The system generates toolpaths from a base mesh design and allows artistic input via mouse strokes during the process. A six-axis robot arm then incrementally removes clay from the model-in-progress, using a custom loop tool.

  • 64-bit RISC-V core claims 10x better CoreMarks/Watt compared to other 3-5GHz CPUs

    Micro Magic unveiled an up to 64-bit RISC-V core showing a groundbreaking 110,000 CoreMarks/Watt, with a 3GHz chip consuming less than 70mW. The company claims 10 times better CoreMarks/Watt compared to other processors in the 3-5GHz range. Considering the spectacular promise and sudden demise of AI tech firm Magic AI, we should perhaps be wary of hyped up companies with Magic in their name. Yet, the astonishing claims about an incredibly efficient RISC-V core coming out of Sunnyvale, Calif. based EDA firm Micro Magic in recent weeks appear to be for real.

  • Arduino Blog » A (very) short guide to help you transition to the Arduino Science Journal

    Arduino acquired the Science Journal app from Google on August 5th, and the final handover takes place on December 11th, 2020. From that date, the Science Journal will no longer be supported by Google. If you haven’t exported your experiments and imported them into the Arduino Science Journal, we strongly encourage you to do so now, as your data will no longer sync with Google Science Journal after that date. [...] While we can’t disclose too much about our future plans for the app, we can tell you that we’ll ensure it will offer easy access to a stream of data that leverages your smartphone sensors, as well as Arduino sensors. The aim is to help learners understand the importance of an inquiry-based educational method rather than passive consumption of information. We’ll also continuously improve the accessibility of the app for all users, and find new ways of experimenting with science. In the near future, we’ll be interacting more with users, so you’ll hear more from us soon! We’ll also be adding more tutorials on our platform dedicated to Science Journal!

Mozilla: WebThings Gateway 1.0, Lobbying and Rust

  • Flying the Nest: WebThings Gateway 1.0 - Mozilla Hacks - the Web developer blog

    After four years of incubation at Mozilla, we are excited to announce the release of WebThings Gateway 1.0 and a new home for the WebThings platform.

  • Mozilla reacts to publication of the EU Democracy Action Plan - Open Policy & Advocacy

    The European Commission has just published its new EU Democracy Action Plan (EDAP). This is an important step forward in the efforts to better protect democracy in the digital age, and we’re happy to see the Commission take onboard many of our recommendations. [...] As a founding signatory to the EU Code of Practice on Disinformation we are encouraged that the Commission has adopted many of our recommendations for how the Code can be enhanced, particularly with respect to its implementation and its role within a more general EU policy approach to platform responsibility.

  • This Week in Rust 367
  • Philip Chimento: Advent of Rust

    I have a bit of time off and I decided to participate in Advent of Code 2020 after my coworker Adrián shared a link to it. I’ve heard that people use challenges like these as an excuse to learn a new programming language, and I have wanted to learn Rust for quite a long time now. Why Rust? From what I’ve heard, it’s a programming language oriented towards high performance and systems programming, like C or C++; but unlike those languages, it was designed in such a way to make it difficult or impossible to make mistakes such as buffer overflows or memory leaks. I have heard that it’s a lot more enjoyable to use than C++ as well. I did write a “Hello World” program in Rust some time ago, and I have heard things about Rust from others, so I wouldn’t be coming to it completely fresh. Nonetheless, fresh enough that I decided that the experience of writing something from scratch, in a new programming language, was unusual enough for me that I would keep a log while I was doing it. So here is that log. It’s a bit stream-of-consciousness. I’ve edited it so that it consists of complete sentences instead of just notes, but I’ve left in the mistakes and dead ends. I made this mainly so that I can look back later when I’ve learned more, and see what mistakes I made.