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Mozilla: Outsourcing to Microsoft, Testing, Recommended Firefox Extensions

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  • Hacks.Mozilla.Org: MDN Web Docs evolves! Lowdown on the upcoming new platform [Ed: It's a shame that Mozilla is even outsourcing documentation to Microsoft's proprietary software trap]

    The time has come for Kuma — the platform that powers MDN Web Docs — to evolve. For quite some time now, the MDN developer team has been planning a radical platform change, and we are ready to start sharing the details of it. The question on your lips might be “What does a Kuma evolve into? A KumaMaMa?”

    For those of you not so into Pokémon, the question might instead be “How exactly is MDN changing, and how does it affect MDN users and contributors”?

    For general users, the answer is easy — there will be very little change to how we serve the great content you use everyday to learn and do your jobs.

    For contributors, the answer is a bit more complex.

    [...]

    Because MDN content is soon to be contained in a GitHub repo, the contribution workflow will change significantly. You will no longer be able to click Edit on a page, make and save a change, and have it show up nearly immediately on the page. You’ll also no longer be able to do your edits in a WYSIWYG editor.

  • Mike Taylor: .www filename flags in web-platform-tests

    So like, if you ever need to load a page on a different subdomain to test some kind of origin-y or domainy-y thing, you can just name your test something amazing like origin-y-test.www.html and it will open the test for you at www.web-platform.test (rather than web-platform.test, or similarly, however your system or server is configured).

  • Contribute to selecting new Recommended extensions | Mozilla Add-ons Blog

    Recommended extensions—a curated list of extensions that meet Mozilla’s highest standards of security, functionality, and user experience—are in part selected with input from a rotating editorial board of community contributors. Each board runs for six consecutive months and evaluates a small batch of new Recommended candidates each month. The board’s evaluation plays a critical role in helping identify new potential Recommended additions.

Dustin J. Mitchell: Taskcluster's DB

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  • Stantinko Botnet Now Targeting Linux Servers to Hide Behind Proxies [Ed: They say almost nothing about the fact that you actually need to sabotage your GNU/Linux setup and have malware installed on it for this to become a risk. Microsoft propaganda at ZDNet set off this "Linux" FUD.]

    According to a new analysis published by Intezer today and shared with The Hacker News, the trojan masquerades as HTTPd, a commonly used program on Linux servers, and is a new version of the malware belonging to a threat actor tracked as Stantinko.