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Greatest Mascot/Logo

Ubuntu Group Hug
14% (204 votes)
openSUSE Lizard
29% (421 votes)
Red Hat Hat
9% (134 votes)
PCLinuxOS Circle of Life
10% (140 votes)
Mepis Pyramids
2% (30 votes)
Mandriva Star
3% (45 votes)
Debian Curly
13% (184 votes)
Slackware S
5% (69 votes)
Gentoo G
7% (100 votes)
Other
7% (104 votes)
Total votes: 1431

Good grief...

How could you even CONSIDER Tux not being the best mascot ever? Sheesh.

re: good grief

Which tux?

Some are cute, some are artistic, most are so ugly even a mother penguin wouldn't love them.

re: Good grief...

well, yes, of course. But he's the generic Linux mascot and I suppose I was trying to poll on the distribution specifics. I thought of including Tux, but decided against it.

When all those stars and

When all those stars and curlies and gs and lizards and whatsoever die out, you'll all be glad to know it's just the circle of life. bummer Smile

Registered Linux User No. 401868

Actually, even though I use

Actually, even though I use Ubuntu and voted for Debian, I like the Scientific Linux logo - it looks like ReactOS.

Mascot/logo

I like the Foresight Linux 'Eagle Eye F'. The Fedora and Chameleon are probably next in line.

re: Mascot

It's not a lizard, it's a chameleon...

My vote goes to the old FreeBSD devil with sneakers

re: Mascot

Chartreux wrote:

My vote goes to the old FreeBSD devil with sneakers

Yeah, he's cute. I almost put that one in the poll, but he's been replaced. The new one is more modern/trendy looking, but doesn't have the same appeal.

re: Mascot

I found this on Wikipedia:

"Initially, FreeBSD employed the BSD Daemon as its logo, but in 2005 a competition for a new logo was arranged. On October 8, 2005, the competition finished and the design by Anton K. Gural was chosen as the new FreeBSD logo[4]. The BSD Daemon will remain as the FreeBSD Project mascot."

So the cute devil has not retired yet... fortunately, because I *hate* the new logo!

re: Mascot

I'm from TN, they're all lizards to me. Big Grin

EDIT: Wikipedia: Chameleons (family Chamaeleonidae) are squamates that belong to one of the best-known lizard families.

re: Mascot

Well, chameleons are indeed a family of animals belonging to the suborder of lizards. Like a human is a primate. One is a collection where the other belongs to. In short: a chameleon is a lizard, but a lizard is not necessarily a chameleon.
By the way: a gecko (the Firefox engine) is a lizard too!

i voted for ubuntu, and i don't even use it

i'm surprised that suse's lizard is at the top, don't get me wrong, it's my distro, but i always thought the lizard is a bit retarded

re: Mascot

That's funny, I voted for the Lizard and I don't like/use SUSE.

re: Mascot

Same here.. I've always liked SUSEs reptile. Red Hats logo came in a close second though.

SUSE

I like this suse's little crocodile!

re: SUSE

crocodile? lol

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