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Ubuntu Twinview Monitors with an NVidia Graphics Card

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I was just thinking about how difficult it was for me to setup dual monitors on my Ubuntu system. I read numerous articles and tutorials about how to get it up and running. The configuration settings were different for each person so it was hard to get it right. After hours searching and hours of tweaking the settings, I finally got it how I like:

Now I’m able to drag windows from one monitor to the other, maximize windows to each of the monitors, and do everything else that Windows dual monitors can do, too.

I’m running Ubuntu 6.10 with a VGA Leadtek (GF6600 PX6600TD-256 R) graphics card. I assume that at this point, both your monitors aren’t working. You’re only using one.

1. Download and install the NVidia drivers

In order for Ubuntu to recognize your graphics card the way we want it to, you have to install the right driver. You can find instructions on how to do this here. It’s really easy using Synaptic, the built-in package manager.

2. Open your Xorg.conf file

Full Story.


As I mentioned yesterday, I was having some “interesting” issues getting Ubuntu to play nice with my new graphics card (GeForce 7900GS).

While it will work without the extra power cable plugged in the nVidia control centre will give you a warning as soon as you boot into Windows.

Under Ubuntu the opposite is the case.

If you try to install Ubuntu with the card’s power cable plugged in you will end up bashing your head against your keyboard (at least I did!), as the installer doesn’t have the correct drivers to handle it.

Solution - unplug the power lead.

Full Configuring Nvidia GeForce 7900 GS on Ubuntu Edgy using Envy.

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