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System76 bring back the Galago Pro with Intel Xe and NVIDIA GPU options

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Linux

Bringing back something of a fan favourite, hardware vendor and Linux distribution maker System76 have announced the brand new Galago Pro.

"The Galago Pro has always been a fan favorite of our laptop offerings," says Carl Richell, Founder and CEO. "The extremely light chassis and well balanced mix of components, all for a very good price, make the Galago an all around excellent computer choice for gamers and engineers alike."

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Also: System76 refreshes the Galago Pro and you can buy the affordable Linux laptop now

Things We Love About the New Galago Pro

  • Things We Love About the New Galago Pro

    The Galago Pro has returned in style! This laptop has received a few upgrades since its last appearance, and we can’t wait to share them with you. So we won’t!

    The Galago Pro’s slim, light aluminum body sports a new look and a larger trackpad. Carry your responsibilities between meetings, classrooms, war rooms, and Supervillans Anonymous member sessions (virtual, of course) without developing a conspicuous hunchback.

This New System76 Linux Laptop Packs Something Special

  • This New System76 Linux Laptop Packs Something Special

    @System76 returns with a new and improved version of one of their gorgeous Linux laptops! The Galago Pro is back and it's more "open" than ever! It also features all kinds of goodies from 11th Gen Intel chips with Iris Xe graphics, to storage loadouts of up to 2TB of NVMe storage and 64GB of RAM.

New Galago Pro Linux Laptop Arrives With Refresh Look

  • New Galago Pro Linux Laptop Arrives With Refresh Look, Upgraded Specs

    Well-known Linux PC vendor System76 has launched the refreshed version of its light and thin Galago Pro Linux laptop. The latest Galago Pro contains several upgrades including looks and specifications.

    This 14-inch laptop with 1080p Full HD matte display now features Intel Iris Xe Graphics along with optional support for NVIDIA graphics (GeForce GTX 1650) for the first time.

Linux on Tiger Lake: System76 Lemur Pro and Galago Pro laptops

  • Linux on Tiger Lake: System76 Lemur Pro and Galago Pro laptops updated with Tiger Lake CPUs

    System76 is one of the few companies that sells laptops sporting the latest hardware with Linux installed out of the box. The retailer just refreshed its popular Lemur Pro and Galago Pro thin-and-lights with Intel’s new 11th Gen Tiger Lake CPUs.

    The new Tiger Lake-equipped laptops come about 8 months after their last refresh, which introduced Comet Lake chips. Tiger Lake has shown itself to be a good upgrade from Comet Lake, primarily in the graphics department.

    The new Galago Pro can be equipped with either an Intel Core 5-1135G7 or Core i7-1165G7, up to 64 GB of DDR4-3200 RAM (2x32 GB), and up to a 2 TB PCIe Gen4 SSD. Users can also opt for an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 for an extra US$150, though that configuration won’t ship until early December. Otherwise, the laptop will use Intel’s Iris Xe Graphics.

    The Lemur Pro has the same CPU and PCIe Gen 4 SSD options but is limited to 40 GB of DDR4-3200 RAM as 8 GB is soldered to the motherboard. This also means the only dual-channel RAM option is 16 GB (2x8 GB). The Lemur Pro also lacks a discrete GPU option. However, it has an extra PCIe Gen 3 slot for another SSD up to 2 TB.

System76 Lemur Pro thin and light Linux laptop gets Tiger Lake

  • System76 Lemur Pro thin and light Linux laptop gets Tiger Lake refresh

    Linux PC company System76 is updating its Lemur Pro thin and light laptop with a new version that supports up to an Intel Core i7-1165G7 processor.

    The new model comes about half a year after the company released a version powered by a less powerful Intel Comet Lake processor… and the upgrade from 10th-gen to 11th-gen Intel Core chips does come with a price.

    The new System76 Lemur Pro sells for $1199 and up, which is $100 higher than the starting price of the old version.

System76 Refreshes the Galago Pro Laptop

  • System76 Refreshes the Galago Pro Laptop

    Linux hardware maker has revamped one of their most popular laptops.

    System76 is known to push the envelope of form and function. But when something works, why reinvent the wheel? That is precisely why the Denver, CO company has given their most popular laptop a bit of a refresh.

    The Galago Pro now supports the latest 11th Gen Intel Core i5 and i7 processors and can top out at 64GB of RAM. And although the base model ships with Intel Iris Xe graphics, the laptop can be spec’d with an optional NVIDIA GTX 1650 GPU.

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