Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora: Trinity Guard, Flatpak, Fedora Program, OpenShift

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Trinity Guard Unveils New Tools for Linux, Db2 for i - IT Jungle

    Trinity Guard is on the move. The Houston, Texas, based security software company, which is the spiritual successor to the PentaSafe products, is rolling out a full auditing solution for Linux. It’s also developing a Linux version of its security management tool, TGCentral, with an AIX version up next. Plus it’s months away from releasing an encryption solution for Db2 for i.

    2020 has not been easy for anyone, but it’s not stopping the folks at Trinity Guard from moving forward on its roadmap items. Near the top of that list is increased support for running on Linux, which has become the dominant operating system for business servers around the world.

    The new TGAudit for Linux solution provides a full-fledged auditing solution for a variety of Linux environments, including Linux running on Power, X86, and ARM servers. The offering will interrogate a customer’s Linux environment and return a report that shows exactly how its security settings are configured, says Randy Bowie, the vice president of engineering at Trinity Guard.

  • Scaling Flathub 100x – Alexander Larsson

    Flatpak relies on OSTree to distribute apps. This means that flatpak repositories, such as Flathub, are really just OSTree repositories. At the core of an OSTree repository is the summary file, which describes the content of the repository. This is similar to the metadata that “apt-get update” downloads.

    Every time you do an flatpak install it needs the information in the summary file. The file is cached between operations, but any time the repository changes the local copy needs to be updated.

    This can be pretty slow, with Flathub having around 1000 applications (times 4 architectures). In addition, the more applications there are, the more likely it is that one has been updated since the last time which means you need to update.

  • Keystone and Cassandra: Parity with SQL | Adam Young’s Web Log

    Look back at our Pushing Keystone over the Edge presentation from the OpenStack Summit. Many of the points we make are problems faced by any application trying to scale across multiple datacenters. Cassandra is a database designed to deal with this level of scale. So Cassandra may well be a better choice than MySQL or other RDBMS as a datastore to Keystone. What would it take to enable Cassandra support for Keystone?

    Lets start with the easy part: defining the tables. Lets look at how we define the Federation back end for SQL. We use SQL Alchemy to handle the migrations: we will need something comparable for Cassandra Query Language (CQL) but we also need to translate the table definitions themselves.

  • Fedora program update: 2020-47 – Fedora Community Blog

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora this week. Elections voting is open through 3 December. Fedora 31 will reach end-of-life on Tuesday. EPEL 6 will reach end-of-life on 30 November.

  • Testing the reliability of Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage on VMWare Distributed vSAN HA

    Storage reliability plays a critical role in managing business-critical applications. A reliable storage solution can help enterprises avoid unnecessary downtime. With Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage continuing to evolve, this blog post shows how we verified the combined reliability of OpenShift Container Storage and Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform when it comes to high availability (HA) in a hardware configuration supported out of the box (mentioned in the Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage Planning Guide). We performed active/passive and active/active site configuration tests.

More in Tux Machines

Video/Shows: Yacy, Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Vs Ubuntu 20.10, Picom

  • Yacy Is The Search Engine That Respects Your Privacy - YouTube

    Yacy is a decentralized, peer-to-peer web search engine. All users are equal with no central controlling authority. Access to the search functions is made by a locally running web server which provides a search box to enter search terms, and returns search results in a similar format to other popular search engines.

  • Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Vs Ubuntu 20.10 | Which Is The BEST Version? | 7 THINGS To Consider - YouTube

    Ubuntu 20.10, Groovy Gorilla is out and like all non-LTS releases, this version is packed with new features and changes. We get a ton of improvements in the user interface especially. With GNOME 3.38 bringing many advancements like an adjustable Application grid, an efficient calendar and so much more to this new Ubuntu, We now have 2 actively supported versions of Ubuntu to choose from. And they both are quite different from each other in how they look, how they behave, their support period, their target user base, and many other things.

  • Picom: Window Blur Should Always Be This Easy - YouTube

    Window blur has been an absolute pain with picom, you've had run really out of date forks that have other missing features that you might want but no longer because it can be done in the main picom fork.

How to monitor file content while they change in Linux

Monitoring file changes in a real time is very easy to do task in Linux System. Directory, files, logs, etc. Changes can be easily monitored in real-time with the help of the watch command. The watch is easy to use the program to monitor changes in files or directories in Linux. It’s come by pre-installed in all Debian and arch-based Linux System. Check Watch is in system or not Execute the below command to know watch command is properly working in your system or not. Read more

Android Leftovers

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

  • Ken Hess (Red Hat): Cyber Week 2020: 13 ideas for what to buy the sysadmin in your life | Enable Sysadmin

    It's that special time of year when you can get great discounts on tech for your favorite sysadmin.

  • [IBM Emeritus] Irving Wladawsky-Berger: Are There Limits to the Predictability of Elections?

    The elegant mathematical models of classical mechanics depict a world in which objects exhibit deterministic behaviors. These models make perfect predictions within the accuracy of their human-scale measurements. But, once you start dealing with atoms, molecules and exotic subatomic particles, you find yourself in a very different world, one with somewhat counter-intuitive behaviors governed by the laws of quantum mechanics. The orderly, predictable models of classical physics have now given way to wave functions, uncertainty principles, quantum tunneling and wave-particle dualities. But, the world of the very small is not the only one with non-deterministic behaviors. So are highly complex systems, especially those systems whose components and interrelationships are themselves quite complex. This is the case with social systems, which are based on individuals, groups, and institutions. It’s quite a challenge to make accurate predictions in such systems due to the the dynamic nature of human behaviors. Terms, like emergence, long tails, and butterfly effects - every bit as fanciful as quarks, charm and strangeness, - are part of the social systems lexicon. Which brings us to the 2020 US election. “The polls were wrong again, and much of America wants to know why,” wrote NY Times journalist David Leonhardt in a recent article. “This is a disaster for the polling industry and for media outlets and analysts that package and interpret the polls for public consumption, such as FiveThirtyEight, The New York Times’ Upshot, and The Economist’s election unit,” said David Graham in The Atlantic.

  • [Red Hat] Why failure should be normalized and how to do it | Opensource.com

    All of your heroes have failures under their belts—from minor mistakes to major disasters. Nobody knows how to do everything automatically, and the process of learning is usually a messy one. So why is the perception that everyone but you knows what they’re doing so common? Why do we externalize our successes but internalize our failures? How does it make you feel when you struggle to learn something new, then see another person take their Jira card away and return at the end of the sprint with something fully fleshed out and working, gushing about it at the demo? Sure, you closed your card too, but it was really hard! There was a new algorithm, a new programming language, a new system all to be learned. How did she make it look so effortless? The truth is, she might have struggled with the same issues you did and wondered how you made it look so effortless! [...] It could be very easy to title this section "my mistakes" and then rattle off all the times I’ve made mistakes, but that doesn’t quite illustrate the point. I recognize these mistakes, but they’re also events that expanded the understanding of my craft. While I didn’t set out to intentionally do any of these things, I certainly learned from them. I have accidentally dropped (deleted) a customer’s database. It was lucky for everyone that it was a beta-phase database and no further harm was done. I learned a valuable lesson that day: be very watchful of what code is doing, and be careful about what environment you are working in. One day, while performing routine maintenance with an odd DNS setup, I accidentally broke the ability for customers to provide credit card information to the secure site. We had two "payments" DNS records that served to override a wildcard DNS record, and I assumed that the second "payments" record was still present. It wasn’t. And then the wildcard record took over, and the DNS started behaving like "payments" wasn’t special at all anymore. Of course, I had no idea this was happening at all—it wasn’t until my maintenance was over that I learned of the folly. Customers weren’t able to provide payment information for almost two hours! I learned my lesson, though: when there is something special about a particular configuration, be sure to make sure it stays special throughout its lifetime. When DNS gets involved, all kinds of things can break.