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today's howtos

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HowTos
  • How to install GNU Cash on Linux

    Are you looking for a free, open-source alternative to Quicken or other proprietary finance apps to use on your Linux PC? Try out GNU Cash. It’s a free, easy to use money management tool that will allow you to track your finances, loan payments, and more. Here’s how to install it on Linux.

  • How to Install Flask on Ubuntu 20.04 | Linuxize

    Flask is a free and open-source micro web framework for Python designed to help developers build secure, scalable, and maintainable web applications. Flask is based on Werkzeug and uses Jinja2 as a template engine.

    Unlike Django , by default Flask doesn’t include ORM, form validation, or any other functionalities provided by third-party libraries. Flask is built with extensions in mind, which are Python packages that add functionality to a Flask application.

    There are different methods to install Flask on Ubuntu.

    Flask packages are included in the official Ubuntu repositories and can be installed using the apt package manager. This is the simplest way to install Flask on Ubuntu 20.04, but not as flexible as installing in a virtual environment. Also, the version included in the repositories may lag behind the latest version of Flask.

  • Acer Aspire Switch 10 E SW3-016's and SW5-012's and S1002's horrible EFI firmware

    Recently I acquired an Acer Aspire Switch 10 E SW3-016, this device was the main reason for writing my blog post about the shim boot loop. The EFI firmware of this is bad in a number of ways...

  • Install Akaunting Self-Hosted Accounting Software on Ubuntu 20.04

    This tutorial will be showing you how to install Akaunting on Ubuntu 20.04 with Apache or Nginx web server. Akaunting is a free, open-source self-hostable accounting software. You can use it for tracking personal finance or small business accounting.

  • Jenkins Server on Linux: A Free and Open-source Automation Server

    Jenkins is not a regular server like Apache or Nginx; it’s a free and open-source server for the developers, programmers, coders, and checkers. Those who are familiar with the concept of GitHub might know the Jenkins server. Jenkins server is a continuous integration server that can help developers build, compile, test, and store codes on the repository. Linux users can decentralize their own codes, among others, through the Jenkins server. The Jenkins server can notify the developer when it finds any error inside the code.

    In the past, developers had to store the code at the code repository, where remotely located developers had to store, marge, and evaluate the codes. This lengthy process might cause a delay in progress. It could also make new bugs. Earlier, developers had to wait for a long time to start a new project until the previous test result came out. Now they can immediately begin another project after one task is done. Installing Jenkins server On Linux can save much time effort of the developers.

More in Tux Machines

This week in KDE: text reflow in Konsole!

  • This week in KDE: text reflow in Konsole!

    This week a huge new feature landed in Konsole: it now reflows the text when you resize the window! This feature can be turned off if you don’t like it, but comes on by default. It works really well. Thanks very much to Carlos Alves and Tomaz Canabrava for this work! It will be released in Konsole 21.04.

  • KDE Will Reflow Text In Konsole On Window Resizing, Kirigami Icons Now Use Less RAM - Phoronix

    KDE developers have remained very busy in the new year working to improve their open-source desktop stack.  Following last week's near total rewrite of the KWin compositing code there has been an interesting batch of new improvements this week. Some of this week's highlights include:  - KDE's Konsole now re-flows text when resizing the window. The functionality is enabled by default (but there is an option to disable it). 

LibreOffice 7.1 Release Candidate Ready for Testing Ahead of Final Release in Early February

LibreOffice 7.1 is the next major release of the beloved and free office suite used by millions of computer users worldwide, and it’s been in development for more than five months. Now, two months after the beta release, the RC (Release Candidate) milestone is ready for public testing. So if you want to help shape the future of the open source LibreOffice office suite and give The Document Foundation’s QA (Quality Assurance) community a helping hand to make sure LibreOffice 7.1 is a rock-solid release, go ahead and download the Release Candidate (RC1) installers for DEB- or RPM-based distros, as well as the source tarball, from the official website. Read more

Today in Techrights

Create Bootable USB Using Etcher in Linux – Download and Usage Guide

Etcher is a utility created by Balena, that makes your life easy with its unique take on creating bootable USB and SD cards with a .iso file. In this guide, I will show you the steps to download and install Etcher. Although it is a bit trivial for some, may be difficult for others. Hence this guide. Read more