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Linux 5.10-rc5

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  • Linux 5.10-rc5
    Hmm. The 5.10 release candidates stubbornly keeps staying fairly big,
    even though by rc5 we really should be seeing things starting to calm
    down and shrink.
    
    There's nothing in here that makes me particularly nervous, but in
    pure numbers of commits, this is the largest rc5 we've had in the 5.x
    series. Number of diff lines too, for that matter. And I can't even
    claim that it's because previous rc's have been small and missing
    stuff and we were just catching up.
    
    Anyway, changes all over, and apart from it being a bit more than I'd
    like, it all looks fairly normal. About half of the patch is drivers,
    with the rest being fairly evenly spread out all over - architecture
    fixes, filesystems, networking, self tests..
    
    We'll have to see how this release shapes up, but I'm still hopeful
    for things to calm down.   Otherwise we get into uncomfortable
    territory for the next release with the holiday season coming up too.
    
    So go forth and test,
    
                 Linus
    
  • Linux 5.10-rc5 Released And It's Still Seeing Too Much Churn - Phoronix

    Linux 5.10-rc4 last weekend was still rather heavy on changes but this evening now brings Linux 5.10-rc5 and unfortunately the situation has not improved...

    With Linux 5.10-rc5 it's more bug fixing as usual for getting into the late stage of the cycle. But there are some additional changes this week to also note: AMD "Arcturus" GPU support is no longer experimental and the first product launched in the form of the AMD Instinct MI100, there is a regression fix for stress-ng that was causing as much as a 70% drop, and the POWER9 L1d cache flushing security change is in place for Linux 5.10 as well as the stable Linux series.

  • Kernel prepatch 5.10-rc5

    The 5.10-rc5 kernel prepatch is out. "The 5.10 release candidates stubbornly keeps staying fairly big, even though by rc5 we really should be seeing things starting to calm down and shrink. There's nothing in here that makes me particularly nervous, but in pure numbers of commits, this is the largest rc5 we've had in the 5.x series."

Linux 5.10 release might get messy around Christmas

  • Linux 5.10 release might get messy around Christmas

    Linus Torvalds, the principal developer of the Linux kernel, has expressed concern about the rate of changes in the current release, and how it might cause issues with the imminent holiday season.

    Torvalds noted his surprise at the uncharacteristically increasing number of changes and how it could lead to an issue in the release announcement for the fifth release candidate (rc5) of the upcoming v5.10 of the kernel.

    “The 5.10 release candidates stubbornly keeps staying fairly big, even though by rc5 we really should be seeing things starting to calm down and shrink,” observed Torvalds.

More clickbait to distract from the real news

  • Linus Torvalds worried Linux kernel might get messy around Christmas

    Linus Torvalds has expressed some worries about progress of version 5.10 of the Linux kernel.

    "Hmm. The 5.10 release candidates stubbornly keeps staying fairly big, even though by rc5 we really should be seeing things starting to calm down and shrink," he said in his weekly state of the kernel post.

    While Torvalds went on to write: "There's nothing in here that makes me particularly nervous," adding: "I'm still hopeful for things to calm down. Otherwise we get into uncomfortable territory for the next release with the holiday season coming up too."

    Torvalds prefers releases to have eight release candidates. If he can stick to that plan, a full 5.10 release will emerge in the week before Christmas. His practice is then to open a two-week merge window that would occupy the less-than-busy times between Christmas and New Year. As a resident of the USA, Torvalds may also have this week's Thanksgiving holiday on his mind as that's another time in which productivity is not at its peak. Developers could therefore move slower than usual and see 5.10 remain a little unruly.

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