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  • Linus Torvalds wants Apple’s new M1-powered Macs to run Linux

    Earlier this month, Apple revealed its own ARM-based M1 processor, along with new MacBooks and a desktop Mac Mini powered by this chip. Reviewers across the globe have been praising Apple‘s first attempt, giving it high marks for performance and battery life.

    All this positive coverage has tempted many to take the plunge and buy one of the new machines — even if some apps are not running natively at the moment. Even Linus Torvalds, the principal developer of the Linux kernel, wants one.

    [...]

    Linux support on MacBooks would’ve made it a more attractive bet for programmers. However, I don’t think any engineers at the Cupertino campus plan to make that happen anytime soon. Sorry, Linus.

  • New Microsoft chip will come with added costs, says ex-NSA hacker

    Microsoft's new security chip, announced last week, will have an impact on hardware-only attacks, an American security professional says, adding that it could also assist in firmware security, but would result in added costs.

Now ZDNet

More clickbait

  • inus Torvalds Would Like To Use An M1 Mac For Linux, But... [Ed: So much commotion and clickbait based on some worthless E-mail which is also pretty meaningless given its context]

    Yes, Torvalds said he'd love to have one of the new M1-powered Apple laptops, but it won't run Linux and, in an exclusive interview he explains why getting Linux to run well on it isn't worth the trouble.

Torvalds wants Apple’s new M1-powered Macs to run Linux

Misleading headline

  • Linux Inventor Linus Torvalds Wants M1 Mac For Linux [Ed: Misleading headline, he does not want it, he says Linux isn't supported (when asked about it)]

    Apple caused a sensation with the introduction of its first Macs based on its own ARM SoC, as they seem to bring a rather unexpected performance boost. Linux inventor Linus Torvalds is accordingly enthusiastic and now wants a MacBook with Apple M1.

Linus Torvalds wants Linux running on Apple's new M1 Macs

  • Linus Torvalds wants Linux running on Apple's new M1 Macs

    When Apple launched its new MacBook Pro, MacBook Air and Mac Mini systems, there was much excitement about the performance boost the M1 chips are bringing to the table.

    People who have been running Windows and Windows apps on Macs, however, are less happy due to the lack of support for Boot Camp, and the lack of M1-ready virtualization software from the likes of Parallels. But what about the prospect of Linux on M1 Macs?

Linus Torvalds doubts Linux will get ported to Apple M1 hardware

  • Linus Torvalds doubts Linux will get ported to Apple M1 hardware

    "I'd absolutely love to have one, if it just ran Linux," Torvalds replied. "I've been waiting for an ARM laptop that can run Linux for a long time. The new [Macbook] Air would be almost perfect, except for the OS."

    Torvalds, of course, can already have an ARM based Linux laptop if he wants one—for example, the Pinebook Pro. The unspoken part here is that he'd like a high-performance ARM based laptop, rather than a budget-friendly but extremely performance constrained design such as one finds in the Pinebook Pro, the Raspberry Pi, or a legion of other inexpensive gadgets.

    Apple's M1 is exactly that—a high performance, desktop-and-laptop oriented system that delivers world-class performance while retaining the hyperefficient power and thermal characteristics needed in the phone and tablet world. On paper, an M1-powered Macbook Air would make a fantastic laptop for Linux or even Windows users—but it seems unlikely that Apple will share.

More Apple

  • Linus Torvalds wants an M1 Mac… but running Linux, obviously

    Linux creator Linus Torvalds wants one of Apple’s first machines using in-house silicon—but running his open-source OS.

    [...]

    Apple’s new M1 Macs have been receiving glowing reviews for performance and battery life. The praise has been hard to ignore, even for those who’ve historically avoided Macs.

    While it’d be a surprise to see Apple change course on its attitude towards Linux anytime soon—Microsoft, on the other hand, has been increasingly supportive.

Developers boot Windows 10 and Linux via virtualization...

  • Developers boot Windows 10 and Linux via virtualization on Apple Silicon Mac

    Ever since Apple announced its custom ARM-based chipset for the Mac lineup, the Apple M1 SoC, modding enthusiasts have waited for the platform to be blown wide open. Users have theorized for a long time now whether it would be possible to boot Windows or standard Linux distributions on ARM Macs. After all, the mainline Linux kernel and Windows 10 are no strangers to the ARM world. All that’s left is the blood, sweat, and tears of developers interested enough in deciphering Apple’s custom ARM implementation. Now, thanks to the efforts of multiple developers, it is possible to boot Windows 10 as well as Linux on the Apple Silicon Mac, albeit via virtualization.

Patreon Project Looks to Bring Linux to Apple Silicon

  • Patreon Project Looks to Bring Linux to Apple Silicon » Linux Magazine

    Developer Hector Martin has created a patreon page to fund his work on developing a port of Linux for Apple Silicon Macs.

    Developer Hector Martin believes Linux is capable of running on Apple hardware powered by M1 chips. In fact, he believes so much in this goal, that he’s created a Patreon project to help fund his efforts.

    This is quite a major task for a single developer, but Martin believes he’s able to pull it off. The project, however, will require a full-time effort, which is why the developer has created the Patreon page.

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