Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

M$ closes Sybari acquistion - and its Unix/Linux lines

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft has completed its acquisition of anti-virus company Sybari Software and announced the end of the company's Unix and Linux versions.

The software giant will continue to support all the anti-virus engines that work with Sybari’s server-based products. Sybari provides virus signature updates using anti-virus engines from other vendors including Sophos, Computer Associates and Kaspersky Labs. Microsoft will integrate its own anti-virus engine, which it acquired in 2003 in its acquisition of GeCad.

Microsoft does plans to continue to support Sybari’s Antigen for Lotus Notes on the Windows platform, but will not sell Antigen versions for Unix and Linux. However, Microsoft will continue to offer Sybari products under existing pricing and licensing terms and support existing users on non-Windows platforms.

"We will continue to support those products for the life of the contracts," said Amy Roberts, director of product management in Microsoft’s security and technology business unit.

Sybari’s Antigen also works with Microsoft Exchange messaging server, as well as Office SharePoint Portal Server 2003, Windows SharePoint Services and Live Communications Server 2005. There is an Antigen version for SMTP Gateways.

Microsoft has been working to integrate Sybari’s Advanced Spam Manager with Exchange’s Intelligent Message Filter technology, according to Roberts: "Probably as we move forward we will continue to see this type of integration and there may be some additional work, but since the deal just closed a lot of that work will be getting the various engineering teams together to see what makes the most sense."

Microsoft also has management integration work to do to mesh its Dynamic Systems Initiative with Sybari’s management platform, which uses a single console to manage its software on the network. The likely intersection would be with Microsoft’s System Center brand of management software that now includes System Management Server, Microsoft Operations Manger, Data Protection Manager and Reporting Manager.

The close of the Sybari acquisition comes a day after Microsoft began soliciting beta testers for its OneCare online service that combines anti-virus, anti-spyware and firewall protection for consumers and small businesses.

The moves are all part of Microsoft’s ongoing effort to beef up the security in its platform. The company also bought anti-spyware firm Giant in December 2004, which is now in beta under the name Microsoft Anti-spyware.

By John Fontana
Network World

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News

Fedora: The Latest

  • Korora 22 Flash Update
    As we announced when Korora 22 was released, Adobe Flash is no longer included by default.
  • Fedora repository for Doom stuff: Zandronum, Doomseeker, CnDoom
    I had a bit of free time over the last few days, and looked at the current state of the art for Doom on Linux. The awesome Rahul Sundaram has been looking after several Doom-related packages for a while – including the Chocolate Doom package – but there are some things that seem to be commonly used these days that we didn’t have packaged. So I packaged them up, and put them in a new repository!
  • CUDA 7.0 enabled programs for Fedora 22
    I’ve udpated the CUDA version in the Fedora 22 Nvidia repository, it now contains CUDA 7.0.28 along with the cuFFT 7.0.35 patch. Note that from this version, CUDA is x86_64 bit compatible only, so there are no more i386 packages. There is still the cudart library available for 32 bit, but I don’t think it’s worth packaging.
  • Secure Boot — Fedora, RHEL, and Shim Upstream Maintenance: Government Involvement or Lack Thereof
    Note that there are parts of this chain I’m not a part of, and obviously linux distributions I’m not involved in that support Secure Boot. I encourage other maintainers to offer similar statements for their respective involvement.
  • Remi repository is changing
    The "remi" repository exists for > 10 years, it have changed a lot, and some recent changes worth to be explained.

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS