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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Israel cyber directorate warns of remotely exploitable Drupal flaw

    A warning has been issued by the Israel National Cyber Directorate about a critical remote code execution flaw in the Drupal content management system.

  • Australian legal industry provider Law In Order hit by Windows ransomware

    Australian end-to-end document and digital solutions provider to the legal industry Law In Order says it has suffered a "cyber security incident" and has had to limit access to most of its website as a precaution.

  • Critical VMware Zero-Day Bug Allows Command Injection; Patch Pending

    VMware explained it has no patch for a critical escalation-of-privileges bug that impacts both Windows and Linux operating systems and its Workspace One.

    The U.S. Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency is warning of a zero-day bug affecting six VMware products including its Workspace One, Identity Manager and vRealize Suite Lifecycle Manager.

    The critical unpatched bug is a command injection vulnerability.

    In a separate VMware advisory, the company did not indicate whether the vulnerability was under active attack. Tracked as CVE-2020-4006, the bug has a CVSS severity rating of 9.1 out of 10. The company said patches are “forthcoming” and that workarounds “for a temporary solution to prevent exploitation of CVE-2020-4006” are available.

  • Manchester United forced to take systems offline following cyberattack

    Manchester United said in a statement Nov. 20 that it had extensive protocols and procedures in place for such an event and had rehearsed for this risk. It added that “our cyber defenses identified the attack and shut down affected systems to contain the damage and protect data.”

    Media channels including the club’s website, mobile app and streaming service were unaffected by the attack and no personal data is believed to have been stolen.

  • Apple's global security chief and two members of Sheriff's office indicted for alleged bribery
  • iPads for gun permits: Apple global security chief indicted in bribery case

    The head of global security at Apple and two top officials from the Santa Clara County Sheriff's Office and a local business owner have been accused in a grand jury indictment of exchanging bribes for concealed gun permits, the Morgan Hll Times, a newspaper in California, has reported.

  • Apple Security Head Charged With Bribery for Gun Licenses

    A California district attorney accused Apple Inc. Chief Security Officer Thomas Moyer of offering a bribe to state officials for gun licenses, according to indictments issued on Monday.

    Moyer was named along with Santa Clara County Undersherrif Rick Sung and Captain James Jensen in a case that involved offering bribes in return for concealed firearms licenses, according to a court document and a statement from the Santa Clara district attorney’s office.

  • Apple head of security accused of offering iPads as bribes for concealed gun permits

    A California grand jury has indicted Apple’s head of global security on charges that he tried to bribe Santa Clara County officials to procure firearms (CCW) licenses, according to a news release. Santa Clara district attorney Jeff Rosen alleges that Thomas Moyer offered 200 iPads — worth about $70,000 — to Capt. James Jensen and Undersheriff Rick Sung in the Santa Clara County sheriff’s office, in exchange for four concealed firearms licenses for Apple employees.

    The charges came after a two-year investigation. “In the case of four CCW licenses withheld from Apple employees, Undersheriff Sung and Cpt. Jensen managed to extract from Thomas Moyer a promise that Apple would donate iPads to the Sheriff’s Office,” Rosen said in the news release. The iPads were never delivered, according to Rosen’s office, because Sung and Moyer became aware in 2019 that the district attorney was executing a search warrant for the sheriff department’s CCW records.

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