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Qt 3D Renderer changes and improvements in Qt 6

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KDE

With Qt 6 well on its way, it’s about time we go over some of the internal changes and optimizations made to Qt 3D for the upcoming release.

In a separate article, my colleague Mike Krus has already highlighted the API changes we’ve made in Qt 3D for Qt 6. This post will dive into the internal changes.

Back in 5.14, we got rid of the Aspect Thread. Yet we still had a Render Thread. On paper, having a dedicated thread would allow you to send drawing commands to the GPU while preparing commands for the next frame. This could potentially help with maintaining a high frame rate, if command submission took a long time. In practice, this worked only in the case that Qt 3D was used as standalone (without QtQuick).

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Qt 6.0's 3D Renderer Is Much Improved But More Work Remains

  • Qt 6.0's 3D Renderer Is Much Improved But More Work Remains

    With Qt 6.0 due to be released in December, Qt-minded consulting firm KDAB has published a blog post outlining the extensive 3D renderer improvements made for this big toolkit update. While Qt6's 3D rendering abilities are much improved, there still is further work ahead.

    The Qt 3D renderer is much improved with Qt6 and now features good support for not only OpenGL but also the likes of Direct3D and Vulkan via the RHI (Rendering Hardware Interface) abstraction layer that has come together nicely. Also significant with Qt 6.0 is the render thread has been eliminated since it really only worked out well with Qt 3D by itself but not in conjunction with Qt Quick. Due to the render thread still blocking at times, such as when needing to sync Qt Quick and Qt 3D content, the render thread hasn't worked out too well. Plus the complexities around thread management and extra resources made it more clear for Qt 6.0 to just eliminate the separate render thread.

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