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GNU Octave 6.1 Released with Improvements / New Functions

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Development
GNU

GNU Octave 6.1 was released a few days ago with numerous improvements, bug-fixes, and a list of new functions.

Changes in Octave 6.1 include...

There’s no PPA repository contains the new release package at the moment of writing.

Before the official Snap package and the community maintained Flatpak package publish the new package, you can download & build GNU Octave from the source tarball...

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GNU Octave 6.1 fine tunes precision and smoothes out some edges

  • GNU Octave 6.1 fine tunes precision and smoothes out some edges

    Friends of open source Matlab-alternative GNU Octave can now get their hands on version 6.1 of the numerical computation tool.

    The first release of the 6.x series has landed with a couple of rewrites and new implementations of already known components that are designed to improve performance and precision. The new rand function, for example, uses a uniform interval between floating point values in the range (0,1) instead of going for uniform density, and makes sure that values generated for single precision outputs are strictly within that spectrum.

GNU Octave Improves Matlab Compatibility

  • GNU Octave Improves Matlab Compatibility

    GNU Octave 6.1 has been released with improvements including changes to the graphics backend, compatibility with Matlab and a number of new and improved functions.

    GNU Octave is popular as a free open source alternative to MATLAB. It provides capabilities for the numerical solution of linear and nonlinear problems, and has extensive graphics capabilities for data visualization and manipulation.

A new release for GNU Octave

  • A new release for GNU Octave

    On November 26, version 6.1 of GNU Octave, a language and environment for numerical computing, was released. There are several new features and enhancements in this release, including improvements to graphics output, better communication with web services, and over 40 new functions. We will take a look at where Octave fits into the landscape of numerical tools for scientists and engineers, and recount some of its long history.

    [...]

    To understand Octave's subsequent development requires some awareness of another tool, called MATLAB, which was also created as a Fortran alternative. MATLAB has an interesting origin story: it was created to enable students to use Fortran's linear algebra routines without having to write Fortran programs. Its authors later turned it into a commercial product, which became quite successful. Now this powerful (and expensive) system is in use by millions of engineers and scientists all over the world. This created a market of people doing numerical computing who became used to MATLAB's syntax, but lost access to it after leaving their employers or institutions; beyond that, some people were also interested in free-software alternatives.

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