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OpenZFS 2.0 Released with ZStandard Compression, Persistent L2ARC, and More

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Software

The biggest change is the rename of the project from ZFS on Linux to OpenZFS, which actually sounds really good and makes the project easily discovered by anyone who wants to an advanced file system and volume manager on their GNU/Linux or FreeBSD operating systems.

The second biggest change of the OpenZFS 2.0 release is the fact that Linux and FreeBSD platforms are now supported from the same repository, which means that both camps are now getting the same features at the same time. On GNU Linux, OpenZFS supports kernels from Linux 3.10 to Linux 5.9, while FreeBSD is supported from version 12 onwards.

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OpenZFS 2.0.0 Released Based On Unified Code For Linux

  • OpenZFS 2.0.0 Released Based On Unified Code For Linux And FreeBSD

    OpenZFS project has officially announced the release of a new version 2.0.0 for its open source ZFS file system with unified Linux and FreeBSD codebase and other new features.

    For those who don’t know, OpenZFS is an open source storage platform that combines the traditional file system with a volume manager.

OpenZFS 2.0 release unifies Linux, BSD and adds tons of new feat

  • OpenZFS 2.0 release unifies Linux, BSD and adds tons of new features

    This Monday, ZFS on Linux lead developer Brian Behlendorf published the OpenZFS 2.0.0 release to GitHub. Along with quite a lot of new features, the announcement brings an end to the former distinction between "ZFS on Linux" and ZFS elsewhere (for example, on FreeBSD). This move has been a long time coming—the FreeBSD community laid out its side of the roadmap two years ago—but this is the release that makes it official.

OpenZFS v2.0.0 targets Linux and FreeBSD

  • OpenZFS v2.0.0 targets Linux and FreeBSD – shame about the Oracle licensing worries

    The OpenZFS project, formerly called ZFS on Linux, has released version 2.0.0 with major new features. The previous release was version 0.86 in October. Both Linux and FreeBSD are supported.

    ZFS is approaching 20 years old. It was developed in 2001 by Sun Microsystems, and open-source code was released with OpenSolaris in 2005. It was ported to FreeBSD in 2008, and in the same year the ZFS on Linux project started. In 2013 the OpenZFS project was announced. ZFS on Linux was an implementation of OpenZFS, but now that the project also targets FreeBSD from the same repository, it is called simply OpenZFS.

    Oracle Solaris also still exists and includes Oracle ZFS, though the OpenZFS project notes: "As Oracle's code is not open source, the OpenZFS wish to maintain compatibility with Solaris ZFS pool versions 29–35 is difficult to realize."

ZFS 2.0.0 Released

  • ZFS 2.0.0 Released

    Version 2.0 of ZFS has been released, it’s now known as OpenZFS and has a unified release for Linux and BSD which is nice.

    One new feature is persistent L2ARC (which means that when you use SSD or NVMe to cache hard drives that cache will remain after a reboot) is an obvious feature that was needed for a long time.

    The Zstd compression invented by Facebook is the best way of compressing things nowadays, it’s generally faster while giving better compression than all other compression algorithms and it’s nice to have that in the filesystem.

    The PAM module for encrypted home directories is interesting, I haven’t had a need for directory level encryption as block device encryption has worked well for my needs. But there are good use cases for directory encryption.

OpenZFS has released an update, but how many users really care?

  • OpenZFS has released an update, but how many users really care?

    The release of version 2.0.0 by the OpenZFS project has some crowing as though some revolutionary new software, which will bring benefits to world+dog, has landed.

    The fact is, until Oracle chief Larry Ellison offers the software community a written assurance that his company - which owns ZFS through its purchase of Sun Microsystems in 2010 - will not sue anyone for using it, its take-up will be limited.

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