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today's leftovers

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  • Try Jed as your Linux terminal text editor | Opensource.com

    You may have heard about Emacs and Vim and Nano, the quintessential Linux text editors, but Linux has an abundance of open source text editors, and it's my goal to spend December giving 31 of them a fair go.

    In this article, I look at Jed, a terminal-based editor featuring a handy drop-down menu, which makes it especially easy for users who are new to terminal editors, as well as those who just don't like remembering keyboard combinations for every function.

  • PAPPL 1.0 RC1 Released With A Goal To Replace CUPS Printer Drivers - Phoronix [Ed: They would be wiser not to use GitHub]

    CUPS printing system founder Michael Sweet who left Apple last year and that left CUPS in a stagnate position (as of writing, still no commits to their Git repository since April) while Sweet continues pushing ahead with his new and modern "PAPPL" effort.

    PAPPL is the printer application framework being worked on by Michael Sweet over the past year for developing CUPS Printer Applications as a replacement to the conventional CUPS printer drivers. PAPPL supports JPEG / PNG / PWG Raster / Apple Raster / raw printing to printers via USB or network connections and supports an embedded IPP Everywhere service.

  • Design of the CRLite Infrastructure

    Firefox is the only major browser that still evaluates every website it connects to whether the certificate used has been reported as revoked. Firefox users are notified of all connections involving untrustworthy certificates, regardless the popularity of the site. Inconveniently, checking certificate status sometimes slows down the connection to websites. Worse, the check reveals cleartext information about the website you’re visiting to network observers.

    We’re now testing a technology named CRLite which provides Firefox users with the confidence that the revocations in the Web PKI are enforced by the browser without this privacy compromise. This is a part of our goal to use encryption everywhere. (See also: Encrypted SNI and DNS-over-HTTPS)

  • AWS Open Sources Graph Notebook

    AWS has open-sourced Graph Notebook, a tool that provides data scientists with an easy way to interact with graph databases using Jupyter notebooks.

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Android Leftovers