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Jono Bacon: Connected diversity

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Ubuntu

What was particularly interesting (apart from the the fact that most of the people who didn’t use Ubuntu used Gentoo) was how Ubuntu, and as such Linux and free software, is becoming part and parcel of peoples lives. If anyone walked past the booth, we would grab them and pester them about Ubuntu, and a huge number of people who walked past seemingly paying no interest were already using Ubuntu. Most of these people were simply not all that excited about it - it is the OS they use, and that was the end of it. This shows that Ubuntu is becoming a real Operating System - people are using it and not automatically becoming all-singing-all-dancing community Linux fans. It is becoming a norm and part of the furniture and this is good news. Of course, it would be great if they all did become community members, but the reality is that a percentage of the user base will become contributors, and to see so many using it in regular end-user scenarios is extremely encouraging.

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