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Programming/Development Leftovers

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Development
  • 6 Essential Python Tools for Data Science

    Data science is an emerging, multidisciplinary field of scientific methods, processes, algorithm development and technology to extract knowledge or insights in ingenious ways from structured or unstructured data.

    At the heart of data science is data. Buckets loads of it, streaming in and stored in enterprise data warehouses. According to IBM, globally, we currently generate over 2.5 quintillion bytes of data every single day.

  • Day 3: Literate Programming with Raku – Raku Advent Calendar

    Different programming language communities have differing cultures. Some are more pragmatic, others more idealistic. Some place great emphasis on having code be thoroughly readable and understandable for anyone who joins an existing project, and some prefer writing out clear and in-depth documentation.

    Raku, inheriting one of the best parts of Perl, has a community that writes great documentation.

  • C++20 Is Still Settling While LLVM Clang Already Adds Option For Starting C++2b/C++23 - Phoronix

    It was just in September that the C++20 standards draft was approved as a major update to the programming language over C++17. While compilers like GCC and LLVM Clang are still completing all of the changes for C++20 support, Clang is already moving ahead and has added support for the "-std=c++2b" option as it begins the endeavor of staging changes likely for C++23.

    Clang currently implements much of C++20 but some items around concepts remain along with work on modules, and other smaller features as outlined via the Clang C++ status page.

  • plocate 1.1.0 released

    I've released version 1.1.0 of plocate. The major new feature is that it now ships its own updatedb; I imported a fair amount of code from mlocate's updatedb (which makes the updatedb implementation GPLv2, unlike the rest of plocate, which is GPLv2+), reworked it heavily and made it read and write plocate databases. The databases need a little extra data, which increases their size by 1% or so, but that's well worth it, because now no longer need the mlocate database; those are typically more than twice the size of plocate's database. Obviously, this also removes the dependency on mlocate.

  • Get the most out of the Vi text editor

    Whether you know it as Vim, Neovim, gVim, nvi, or even Elvis, the quintessential Unix editor is easily Vi. Included in probably every Linux and BSD distribution, Vi is a lightweight and minimalist text editor that many users love for its simple and succinct keyboard shortcuts and dual-mode design.

    The original Vi editor was an application written by Bill Joy, creator of the C shell. Modern incarnations of Vi have added many features, including multiple levels of undo, better navigation while in insert mode, line folding, syntax highlighting, plugin support, and much more. Vim is regarded as the most popular modern implementation, and most people actually mean Vim when they refer to Vi.

    All incarnations hearken back to the same goal, though, so this article looks at Vi in a generic sense. The implementation on your computer may differ slightly, but you can still benefit from editing text the Vi way.

  • Jonathan Dowland: OpenJDK Author

    I have recently become an OpenJDK Author. Practically this means I can query the Java Bug Database directly, and I can author Mercurial for committing to the relevant OpenJDK project myself, rather than needing sponsors in both cases.

  • RcppTOML 0.1.7: Support for g++-11, Minor Updates

    TOML is a file format that is most suitable for configurations, as it is meant to be edited by humans but read by computers. It emphasizes strong readability for humans while at the same time supporting strong typing as well as immediate and clear error reports. On small typos you get parse errors, rather than silently corrupted garbage. Much preferable to any and all of XML, JSON or YAML – though sadly these may be too ubiquitous now. TOML has been making inroads with projects such as the Hugo static blog compiler, or the Cargo system of Crates (aka “packages”) for the Rust language.

  • CMake: Use new style imported targets to link libraries
  • Still on Github

    But for the people who don’t agree with me and think Free Software needs free tools – I say awesome. I am very glad you exist, and really there’s about 20% of me that also agrees. That part of me is happy when I come across projects hosted in e.g. Gitlab.com at least. It’s obviously good for there to be some diversity and competition, beyond the fact that Gitlab is at least at the core FOSS. I also hope at some point somehow pagure’s model of storing issues and PR comments in Git takes off too. Or maybe it’ll be something like Radicle.

More in Tux Machines

Getting to know Kyeong Sang Kim, Red Hat general manager for Korea

We’re delighted to welcome Kyeong Sang Kim to Red Hat as a general manager for Korea. In the new role, he will be responsible for Red Hat’s business operations in the country. Kyeong Sang is an expert in the field of IT consulting, supporting numerous business innovation projects for more than 25 years. Prior to joining Red Hat, Kyeong Sang served as the CEO of SICC (Ssangyong Information & Communications Corp), where he successfully led the company’s digital transformation to the cloud. He has also held several other leadership roles at global companies, including Accenture. We caught up with Kyeong Sang to find out more about his interest in open source and Red Hat, and his insights on leadership. Read more

CentOS is gone—but RHEL is now free for up to 16 production servers

Last month, Red Hat caused a lot of consternation in the enthusiast and small business Linux world when it announced the discontinuation of CentOS Linux. Long-standing tradition—and ambiguity in Red Hat's posted terms—led users to believe that CentOS 8 would be available until 2029, just like the RHEL 8 it was based on. Red Hat's early termination of CentOS 8 in 2021 cut eight of those 10 years away, leaving thousands of users stranded. As of February 1, 2021, Red Hat will make RHEL available at no cost for small-production workloads—with "small" defined as 16 systems or fewer. This access to no-cost production RHEL is by way of the newly expanded Red Hat Developer Subscription program, and it comes with no strings—in Red Hat's words, "this isn't a sales program, and no sales representative will follow up." Read more

Linux at Home: Digital Music Production with Linux

We are told by our governments that in the current crisis the single most important action we can take is to stay at home and minimise the amount of contact with others. The new variants of Covid-19 are much more transmissible than the virus’s previous version. The advice to stay safe is therefore even more important. It’s only with everyone abiding by the law can we protect our health services and save lives. In this series, we look at a range of home activities where Linux can play its part, making the most of our time at home, keeping active and engaged. The change of lifestyle enforced by Covid-19 is an opportunity to expand our horizons, and spend more time on activities we have neglected in the past. Read more

Android Leftovers