Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

NVIDIA launches GeForce 7800 GTX - reviews are rolling in

Filed under
Hardware

Like we already reported weeks ago NVIDIA today launched the GeForce 7800 GTX (G70). The GeForce 7800 GTX is made on a 110nm process and uses 303 million transistors. The graphics core runs at 430MHz and has 24 pixel pipelines and 8 vertex shaders.

The card's architecture is based on the previous generations but does feature some new things such as an improved shader engine which NVIDIA called CineFX 4.0. Transparant Dynamic Ultra Sampling (TSAA) is another new feature, to improve AA quality.

After taking a look at some of the reviews I noticed that the GeForce 7800 GTX perform better than a GeForce 6800GT SLI system in most benchmarks. Mostly the difference accounts for about 10 percent but in UT 2004 Icetomb (1600x1200: 0x AA/0x AF) the ATI X850XT scored 42 percent less than the new 7800GTX!

However, it should also be noticed that the GeForce 6800GT SLI and ATI X850XT seem to be a bit faster in some benchmarks.

Fortunately the new GeForce 7800 GTX uses single slot cooling and uses 'only' 100W. This is pretty impressive as a GeForce 6800 Ultra SLI system uses about 220W and takes four slots.

TBREAK says the 7800 GTX consumes less power than the GeForce 6800. The cooling solution of the 7800 GTX reference card produces only 24dB and keeps the card at 47 degrees idle and 55 degrees on load.

Here are the first reviews so you can take a look at the specifications and performance of NVIDIA's new breed: (more reviews will be added over the day)

  • TBREAK
  • Tom's Hardware Guide
  • HTPCNews
  • NV News
  • NV News (some SLI results)
  • Xtremesystems (Overclocked SLI tests -15990 3DMark05)
  • Bjorn3d
  • Digit Life
  • Hardware Secrets
  • TrustedReviews
  • AnandTech
  • Neoseeker

    NVIDIA claims limited quantities of the GeForce 7800 GTX will be immediately available in stores for a cost of about $599.

    dvhardware.net

  • More in Tux Machines

    Emacs & the obsessive email mongerer

    I had already mentioned in passing here that I am using Emacs for a variety of tasks: outline, project management and planning with Org-Mode, IRC (go figure, my default email client on all my machines is Emacs’ ERC), notes editing or quick scribbling with the Scartch buffer (happens to me all day long), and regularly, albeit less frequently than in 2013, various editing of html pages, javascript and sometimes even Python when I dare to edit one or two things in Python scripts. A consequence of all these use cases is that I have Emacs open almost everyday on almost any of my machines. Read more

    MIPS tempts hackers with Raspbery Pi-like dev board

    Hard to choose between Raspberry Pi, BeagleBone Black, and MinnowBoard Max? Now there’s another choice: the open source MIPS-based “Creator CI20″ dev board. In a bid to harness some of the energy and enthusiasm swirling around today’s open, hackable single board computers Imagination Technologies, licensor of the MIPS ISA, has unveiled the ISA’s counter to ARM’s popular Raspberry Pi and BeagleBone Black SBCs. These days, every processor vendor simply must have a community supported dev board in order to engage with the developer communities. (Incidentally, Intel’s is the MinnowBoard Max and AMD’s is the Gizmo.) Read more

    Samsung announces the Gear S while LG officially unveils the G Watch R

    Samsung announced yet another smartwatch, Samsung Gear S that runs Tizen and comes with a 3G wireless radio. I have seen some call this the Gear Note because it does have a long two inch curved Super AMOLED display. The Gear S has WiFi, Bluetooth, and 3G radios and antennas inside so you can use the watch when your phone isn't handy. Turn-by-turn pedestrian navigation is powered by HERE. It has an integrated GPS chip and can be used for exercise, again without a phone connection. Read more

    Kubuntu 14.10 beta 1 arrives, comes with Plasma 5 preview

    The Christmas season for GNU/Linux is coming as most communities will be releasing the next version of their Linux-distributions. Betas have started to arrive and there is obvious excitement around those distributions which offer a great Plasma experience and Kubuntu is one such distribution. Kubuntu has really improved a lot lately. I remember those days, some 2 years back, when Kubuntu was known for ruining the ‘KDE’ experience. It used to be buggy and ugly. Every time I came across someone who dearly hated ‘KDE’ and if I asked which OS did he try, the answer used to be Kubuntu 99% of the time. Read more