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today's howtos

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HowTos
  • Font Management On Linux - YouTube

    Many new-to-Linux users have questions about installing fonts and previewing fonts on Linux. While there are some nice GUI applications that help with these tasks, you don't actually need to install any extra programs to manage your fonts.

  • Dmenu Is Great So I'll Keep Simping For It - YouTube

    At this point the only Suckless tool I actively use is Dmenu, it's an absolute great launcher especially if you're the kind of person who doesn't really care about having a super fancy looking app, Dmenu is functional and that's all it needs to be.

  • Remove ^M (CTRL-M) Characters from a File in Linux - Putorius

    Operating systems have different ways to handle a newline in their text editors. For example Windows uses a specific carriage return (CR) which is depicted as ^M on Linux, followed by a line feed (LF) to indicate a newline. Linux and UNIX on the other hand use only the line feed to denote the end of a line. This often causes issues when transferring (or even copy and pasting) a file from Windows to Linux. It is hard to spot, and often leaves people scratching their head and wondering why their configuration file is not working.

  • How to install fonts in Gimp on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install fonts in Gimp on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How to Install Rocket.Chat on CentOS 8

    Rocket.Chat is a free and open-source chat and messaging application built with Meteor. It is an alternative to Slack and allows you to chat with other members, make video and audio calls, create channels and private groups, share files, and folders and many more. It is self-hosted and helps your team to communicate and share ideas on desktop and mobile devices.

  • How to Check Ubuntu Version with Command or Script

    The lsb-release is the standard package for reporting the version on Ubuntu systems. Which is basically written in Python programming language.

    The lsb-release package provides a command lsb_release used to check Ubuntu version and codename on command line. In this tutorial, you will learn various options to lsb_release command on Ubuntu system.

  • Updated Docker pages

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