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Corporate contradictions, SCO OpenServer full of Open Source

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OSS

The SCO group that has spent much of it’s time and money recently in a fight to extort billions of dollars from IBM for alleged intellectual property infringements with regards to Linux, has filled their latest server release (OpenServer 6) with all manner of Open Source/GPL products. Products like Apache (the worlds most popular web server software currently running on nearly 70% of the worlds web sites.), Samba ( software needed for Unix servers to talk to Windows servers and clients), MySQL, (very popular Open Source database), OpenSSL/OpenSSH (tools for encrypting communication between systems), not to mention Open Source applications like Firefox and OpenOffice and the KDE Window manager/desktop platform. It is interesting that the company that claimed in court and the press that the GPL (the license covering the vast majority of Open Source software) was unconstitutional and void or voidable has released a product in which most of the useful tasks such a product can do on a modern network are provided by the very Open Source software for which they have shown such disdain.

Since all of the same tools and more are available totally for free with an enterprise Operating System based on Linux like CENTOS, or for those that prefer a paid, supported product by Redhat, it makes you wonder who would buy an SCO product with the same features which would serve no real purpose other then to open yourself to potential future litigation from SCO, (Ask DaimlerChrysler and Autozone for example).

Source.

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