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Novell responds: 'Stop fixating on the patent deal'

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SUSE

In case it's not abundantly clear, I despise Novell's patent pact with Microsoft. But, as Bruce Lowry wrote me today (because comments are turned off on the blog, due to a massive spike in comment spam), there may be some bright spots on the Novell horizon that I have not reported. I'm willing to "concede" that, and am happy to hear about it. (I was there in the early days of Novell's Linux movement, after all.)

I just wish Novell wouldn't stifle its positive movement with a massive step in the wrong direction. The patent deal represents this. Do you think Microsoft offered this (as well as the interoperability work) to Novell first? Read between the lines of Bill Hilf's earlier comments on the topic. Of course Microsoft tried Red Hat first. Red Hat almost certainly went along with interoperability, but wouldn't swallow the patent pill, because it's hugely negative for Linux and open source generally.

I wish Novell saw this.

In the meantime, Bruce wishes I saw a few other things. His words, with his permission:

Full Story.

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