Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • POWER9 + ARM64 Performance For Dav1d 0.8 AV1 Decoding - Phoronix

    With last week's release of dav1d 0.8 for CPU-based AV1 video decoding we provided a number of x86_64 benchmarks while questions were raised around the ARM64 and POWER9 performance. Here are such benchmarks for those wondering about the AV1 video decoding speed on those architectures.

  • Mesa 21.0 Is Now Working With Haiku OS For Software OpenGL Rendering

    BeOS-inspired Haiku OS can now run with Mesa 21.0 well using the latest development code.

    A number of patches worked on for Haiu OS back for Mesa 20.x were freshened up and with some extra tweaking and code cleaning those patches have now been merged for Mesa 21.0. This includes factoring out a lot of the OpenGL legacy dispatch code and a lot of cleanups around the Softpipe driver handling.

  • Element: The Greatest Way To Access Matrix - YouTube

    I've been really liking Matrix recently and one of the biggest things helping that is that the main client called Element is actually really solid, it does have a few usability issues that need to be sorted out but right now it's still an amazing way to try out the platform.

  • Ubuntu Fridge | Call for Nomination: Local Communities Research Committee

    The Community Council has concluded that we need a new evaluation of the Ubuntu Local Communities project itself and this should be done by a Local Communities Research Committee.

    You can read the thoughts behind this call and what we are looking for on the Community Hub:
    https://discourse.ubuntu.com/t/local-communities-research-committee/20186

  • Wikipedia is 20, and its reputation has never been higher

    Yet Wikipedia is an oddity. It defies the Silicon Valley recipe for success. The site has no shareholders, has generated no billionaires and sells no advertising. Today’s aspiring tech giants burn vast quantities of investors’ money subsidising taxi rides (Uber) or millennial messaging (Snap) in pursuit of “scale”. Wikipedia grew organically, as more and more ordinary people decided to contribute. The site has its roots in the techno-optimism that characterised the internet at the end of the 20th century. It held that ordinary people could use their computers as tools for liberation, education and enlightenment.

    Like most Utopian thinking, the idea of an amateur encyclopedia was, for many years, treated as a bit of a joke. “A few endorse Wikipedia heartily. This mystifies me,” wrote a former president of the American Library Association in 2007. “A professor who encourages the use of Wikipedia is the intellectual equivalent of a dietician who recommends a steady diet of Big Macs with everything,” he sneered. Even now, after numerous academic studies highlighting its reliability, Wikipedia still lacks the gravitas and authority of older encyclopedias like “Britannica”, which are written by paid academic experts rather than amateurs. Schools, universities and The Economist’s fact-checkers frown on relying on it.

  • PHP 8.0 Is Too Fresh For Fedora 34 That It Will Be Punted To F35 In The Autumn - Phoronix

    While Fedora has been well known for years in always shipping the very latest packages in its distribution as of release even if it means using the likes of a near-final GCC compiler pre-release, developers have decided to postpone the shipping of PHP 8.0 until the autumn with their Fedora 35 release.

    PHP 8.0 was released at the end of November with many new features and changes. While it released in plenty of time for getting it into Fedora 34 that is due out this spring, the Fedora developers have decided to instead focus on shipping PHP 8.0 in the fall with the succeeding Fedora 35 release.

  • Java Generics With Upper and Lower Bounds Simply Explained

    Generics in Java and especially such with upper and lower bounds can be confusing even though they are otherwise very useful.

  • What Fonio, or any other food, should share with serious digital standards

    What Yolélé is doing seems too good, and too important to me, to not wish that it is really future-proof.

    If Yolélé goes bankrupt, something that again I do not wish to them, what happens to their proprietary system? Will it be lost in some legal limbo, where noone else can resume the good fight without reinventing lots of wheels, because that “intellectual property” is locked?

    What if Yolélé ends up exactly like scores of competitors of Facebook or Google, that is bought with a mountain of cash, for the only reason to shut it down, in order to make much bigger mountains of cash?

    A good way to prevent such outcomes, maybe the oly one, would be for Yolélé to become like email, or other digital standards that are ubiquitous exactly because they are impossible to really buy out. Yolélé should “configure” itself, as soon as possible, to “die in Open Source fashion”](/2019/02/what-should-happen-when-an-organization-dies/).

  • Intel Preparing New Driver Option To Disable GPU Security Mitigations - Phoronix

    Stemming from the renewed attention this week of Haswell GT1 graphics being broken for the past half-year under Linux with the latest versions of the kernel, a revised patch was sent out to restore that graphics support for low-end Haswell Celeron/Pentium processors. As part of that, a new option is being introduced to allow disabling security mitigations of the Intel graphics driver.

    This patch was sent out on Saturday that fixes up the Haswell GT1 support following the public attention this week over the low-end Haswell graphics support managing to be broken for the past several kernel release cycles while a prior version of that patch has been floating on the bug report thread for weeks.

  • L1d Cache Flushing On Context Switch Trying Again But More Conservative In 2021 - Phoronix

    Coming out in early 2020 were patches by an Amazon engineer to implement flushing the L1 data cache on context switching in the name of security given the various data sampling vulnerabilities. That work so far has been rejected from the mainline kernel but today was updated and makes it harder to enable and thus moving forward could stand chances to finally see the opt-in functionality merged to mainline.

    This opt-in L1d flushing on context switching tried for the Linux 5.8 kernel but at the time was rejected by Linus Torvalds as "beyond stupid", big performance implications, and not necessarily working out as desired. That L1d flushing work was since revised but hasn't yet made it into the mainline kernel as of Linux 5.11.