Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

KeePass 2.47 Released! How to Install in Ubuntu 20.04, 20.10

Filed under
Software
Security

KeePass password manager 2.47 was released user interface and integration enhancements and minor new features and improvements.

Read more

KeePass v2.47 Released With New Features and Improvements

  • KeePass v2.47 Released With New Features and Improvements

    You should not use the same password on all the websites, and you cannot possibly remember all of them all the time. Password managers solve this problem for you by creating strong password and remember them for you.

    Unlike most other password managers on Linux, KeePass Password Manager doesn’t store your password in cloud. Instead, it stores all your passwords within a local database. And this database can be accessed with a master key.

    Recently, KeePass released a new stable version 2.47 with new features. It includes the option to save search parameters as profiles, XPath expression search mode, Argon2id key derivation function, and more.

    The release also includes some major improvements in search performance, enhancement on the user interface, integration, and more. Although KeePass is mainly released for Windows, there are unofficial packages available for Linux.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Daffodil Promoted To Being An Apache Top-Level Project

    Following the recent promotions of DataSketches and ECharts, the Apache Software Foundation has promoted Daffodil as their newest top-level project. Apache Daffodil is an open-source universal interchange implementation of the Data Format Description Language (DFDL). The Data Format Description Language (DFDL) standard is a modeling language for text and binary data in a standardized manner. DFDL basically aims to make data more portable thanks to providing an open framework for describing any data format.

  • At Least 30,000 U.S. Organizations Newly Hacked Via Holes in Microsoft’s Email Software

    At least 30,000 organizations across the United States — including a significant number of small businesses, towns, cities and local governments — have over the past few days been hacked by an unusually aggressive Chinese cyber espionage unit that’s focused on stealing email from victim organizations, multiple sources tell KrebsOnSecurity. The espionage group is exploiting four newly-discovered flaws in Microsoft Exchange Server email software, and has seeded hundreds of thousands of victim organizations worldwide with tools that give the attackers total, remote control over affected systems.

  • Linux Developers Continue Discussing "SLS" Mitigation For The Kernel - Phoronix

    Disclosed by Arm last summer was the Straight Line Speculation (SLS) vulnerability and they were quick to introduce new safeguards against SLS in the GCC and LLVM compilers. The compiler-based mitigations to straight-line speculation involves adding speculation barrier sequences around the vulnerable instructions to prevent speculatively executing instructions around changes in control flow. While compiler developers were quick to add the options, so far the Linux kernel developers are in disagreement still over its importance and the proposed patches that would flip on this option when compiling the ARM Linux kernel. While compiler support is out there for hardening against straight-line speculation on ARM, seeing these options utilized by potentially affected software hasn't been so quick. In February there were Google engineers proposing a kernel option for enabling the ARM SLS mitigation. The kernel patch is for basically enabling the "-mharden-sls=" compiler option for inserting speculation barrier (SB) instructions or otherwise DSB+ISB instructions around the instructions vulnerable to SLS.

KDE: Meeting of the KDE Itinerary Developers and Exiv2 Project

  • KDE Itinerary @ German Open Transport Meetup

    The German Open Transport Meetup started mid last year, as a get-together for anyone interested or involved in mobility or transportation in general, and in Open Data/Free Software in that context in particular. Being forced to be virtual from the start due to the pandemic is probably what gave it the critical mass to keep up the unusual high pace for such an event with its bi-weekly rhythm, and with no shortage on topics in sight. Many of the things discussed at the meetup so far had immediate impact on KDE Itinerary (and the KPublicTransport library in particular), the biggest example probably being the rental bike/scooter support. A large number of the attendees actually working for local or national transport operators or public administration has also been invaluable for getting first-hand access and insights.

  • Exiv2 project submission to the KDE community
    Ladies and Gentlemen:
    
    I am writing to you on behalf of the Exiv2 project https://exiv2.org.
    
    Exiv2 is a C++ library and a command-line utility to read, write, delete
    and modify Exif, IPTC, XMP and ICC image metadata. It is widely used in the
    Linux ecosystem and part of many applications such as digiKam, Gimp,
    darktable and many more.
    
    The Exiv2 project is hosted at the moment on GitHub (
    https://github.com/Exiv2/exiv2). We would like to evaluate the possibility
    of onboarding the Exiv2 project into the KDE community.
    
    The project is in good shape and the next release is scheduled to ship May
    2021. There is a small group of people who frequently contribute to the
    project.  However the current maintainer, Robin Mills, is retiring at the
    age of 70 after 13 years of service to the project.  Robin has written a
    book about the project and discusses every aspect of both the Exiv2
    Architecture and Image Metadata Standards.
    https://clanmills.com/exiv2/book/
    
    Last Saturday (2021-02-27) there was a meeting concerning the future of the
    Exiv2 and we tried to find a new maintainer.  Regrettably because of the
    time demand imposed on the maintainer, no one volunteered.  By joining the
    KDE community we hope to address this issue and keep this important project
    alive. The meeting notes can be found on the GitHub issue (
    https://github.com/Exiv2/exiv2/issues/1466).
    
    In addition to finding a new maintainer, being part of KDE would bring
    Exiv2 into the Open Invention Network.  We are very interested in this
    aspect of KDE as it mitigates risks involved in patent discussions.
    
    Yours,
    
    Alex Esseling and Robin Mills
    
  • Exiv2 Looks To Team Up With The KDE Project

    Exiv2, the widely-used C++ metadata library / tools for dealing with image metadata via EXIF / IPTC / XMP standards and ICC profiles is looking to join the KDE project. This C++ library and CLI tools for dealing with image metadata is widely used already in the open-source world, including by several KDE programs like Krita, digiKam, and KPhotoAlbum. Software outside of KDE like GIMP and Darktable also leverage this image metadata library.

Manage containers on Raspberry Pi with this open source tool

Containers became widely popular because of Docker on Linux, but there are much earlier implementations, including the jail system on FreeBSD. A container is called a "jail" in FreeBSD terminology. The jail system was first released in FreeBSD 4.0 way back in 2000, and it has continuously improved since. While 20 years ago it was used mostly on large servers, now you can run it on your Raspberry Pi. Jails vs. containers on Linux Container development took a very different path on FreeBSD than on Linux. On FreeBSD, containerization was developed as a strict security feature in the late '90s for virtual hosting and its flexibility grew over the years. Limiting a container's computing resources was not part of the original concept; this was added later. When I started to use jails in production in 2001, it was quite painful. I had to prepare my own scripts to automate working with them. Read more

today's howtos

  • How To Install VirtualBox on Manjaro 20 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install VirtualBox on Manjaro 20. For those of you who didn’t know, VirtualBox is open-source cross-platform virtualization software for x86 architecture and this software allows you to create and run guest operating systems (“virtual machines”) such as Linux and Windows on top of the host operating system. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step installation of VirtualBox on a Manjaro 20 (Nibia).

  • How to Install and Configure Nagios in Ubuntu Linux

    Nagios is a robust continuous and real-time monitoring tool to monitor your organizations and servers. Nagios can be installed on Ubuntu Linux desktop and server system for both manual and automatic monitoring. If you have a company that runs server-level operations, you probably need continuous integration (CI) and continuous delivery (CD) tools to make your production rate faster and better. Nagios can help you to grow your company by providing better analysis. However, if you have a software production company, you can look at the Jenkins server features. Jenkins and Nagios both can be used in Linux through a plugin arrangement.

  • Linux Filesystem Error: Transaction failed when using LXD - nixCraft

    I am a big fan of LXD, a next-generation Linux system container manager and default on Ubuntu. It allows me to run desktop apps or server apps in an isolated environment. Ubuntu provides LXD with robust security in mind. However, this might lead to undesired side effects, such as individual packages under OpenSUSE or CentOS Linux may not be updated. One such package is the filesystem package. Let us see how to fix Error: Transaction failed when you try to update filesystem package under CentOS, OpenSUSE, and other Linux containers running under LXD.

  • Creating Text | Inkscape

    This is the fourth of Inkscape For Students the series after we learned about Fonts before, now we will learn how to create text. When doing design with computer, you will find text is an important part -- you will earn so much by just learning text alone. This is why this series invite you to practice firstly with text before shapes and colors. Now let's learn and practice!

  • Making 12factor Elixir/Phoenix releases

    Elixir had a bad reputation for its deployment story due to the complex tooling and compile-time configuration preference. That is history now as we can easily make Elixir v1.11 releases with the runtime configuration to adhere to the 12factor style of deployment. If you don’t know what 12factor is, it’s a document made at Heroku with recommendations how to design your applications. Although the purpose was most likely about stirring people into making applications that would run smoothly on the Heroku platform, it’s a quite sensible set of recommendations. I don’t think you have to adhere to 12factor at all costs, but some points make sense. This post is namely about section III., which recommends storing configuration in an environment. Something a bit problematic in Elixir before, but something I always wanted. Sections on dependencies and logs are also relevant, while sections on stateless processes and concurrency might not apply to us as Beam has its own lightweight stateful processes. However, you can decide to keep Elixir nodes stateless and use something like Redis.

  • How to Use Scanline Sync and Cap FPS In RivaTuner - Make Tech Easier

    While RivaTuner Statistics Server (RTSS) is most well-known for being bundled with MSI Afterburner and used for monitoring and overclocking GPUs, RTSS actually has some use separate from Afterburner. Here, we discuss those functions and teach you how to use them to cap your FPS (frame per second) or enable Scanline Sync. [...] FPS in this context refers to Frames Per Second, and on PCs where you have an FPS exceeding your refresh rate (such as 100 FPS on a 60 HZ panel), you’re much more prone to screen tearing and highly-variable FPS. Both of these can be visually disorienting and a competitive disadvantage, but the seemingly only way to fix it in most games is to enable some form of V-Sync, which is much more visually consistent but adds a lot more input latency. Using an FPS cap, you can set your in-game framerate to just at or just under your screen refresh rate. If the game you’re playing offers an FPS cap, chances are high that you’ll want to use that cap instead of RivaTuner’s, but if you want to learn how to use RivaTuner’s for universal application, keep reading.