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Seeed launches BeagleV, a $150 RISC-V computer designed to run Linux

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Seeed Studios—the makers of the Odyssey mini-PC we reviewed back in August—have teamed up with well-known SBC vendor BeagleBoard to produce an affordable RISC-V system designed to run Linux.

The new BeagleV (pronounced "Beagle Five") system features a dual-core, 1GHz RISC-V CPU made by StarFive—one of a network of RISC-V startups created by better-known RISC-V vendor SiFive. The CPU is based on two of SiFive's U74 Standard Cores—and unlike simpler microcontroller-only designs, it features a MMU and all the other trimmings necessary to run full-fledged modern operating systems such as Linux distributions.

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$119+ BeagleV powerful, open-hardware RISC-V Linux SBC targets

  • $119+ BeagleV powerful, open-hardware RISC-V Linux SBC targets AI applications

    Running Linux on RISC-V hardware is already possible, but you’d have a choice of low-end platforms like Kendryte K210 that’s not really practical for anything, or higher-end board like SiFive HiFive Unmatched or PolarBerry for which you’d have to spend several hundred dollars, or even over one thousand dollars to have a complete system.

    So an affordable, usable RISC-V Linux SBC is clearly needed. We previously wrote about an upcoming Allwinner RISC-V Linux SBC that will be mostly useful for camera applications without 3D GPU, and a maximum of 256MB RAM. But today, we have excellent news, as the BeagleBoard.org foundation, Seeed Studio, and Chinese fanless silicon vendor Starfive partnered to design and launch the BeagleV SBC (pronounced Beagle Five) powered by StarFive JH7100 dual-core SiFive U74 RISC-V processor with Vision DSP, NVDLA engine, and neural network engine for AI acceleration.

BeagleV is a RISC-V single board PC for $150 or less

  • BeagleV is a RISC-V single board PC for $150 or less

    Since the first Raspberry Pi launched almost a decade ago, there’s been an explosion of small, inexpensive single-board computers with ARM-based processors and support for Linux-based operating systems.

    The new BeagleV is a little different. It’s a small single-board PC with a RISC-V processor and support for several different GNU/Linux distributions as well as freeRTOS.

    With prices ranging from $120 to $150, the BeagleV is pricier than a Raspberry Pi computer, but it’s one of the most affordable and versatile options to feature a RISC-V processor. The makers of the BeagleV plan to begin shipping the first boards in April and you can sign up to apply for a chance to buy one of the first at the BeagleV website.

Introducing the first affordable RISC-V board designed to run...

  • Introducing the first affordable RISC-V board designed to run Linux

    Seeed and BeagleBoard.org® have announced an official collaboration with the leading RISC-V solutions provider, StarFive, to create the latest member of the BeagleBoard.org® series, BeagleV™ (pronounced Beagle five.) BeagleV™ is the first affordable RISC-V board designed to run Linux. BeagleV™, pushes open-source to the next level and gives developers more freedom and power to innovate and design industry leading solutions with an affordable introductory price of $149 followed by lower cost variants in subsequent releases.

    [...]

    BeagleV™ supports a high-level of flexibility in development, which gives Linux users, Kernel, and BSP developers more flexibility from silicon to hardware. The social and community value of this development board is to elevate open-source to the next level, and the three parties are embracing this and pushing it further to enable the evolution of science and technology industries. BeagleV™ marks the first time that hardware development has ever achieved this level of freedom and openness, and the significance of the revolutionary collaboration is the shared purpose of the three parties, which is to make the open-source community stronger and more sustainable.

At Last: an Affordable RISC-V Board With Desktop Linux Support

  • At Last: an Affordable RISC-V Board With Desktop Linux Support

    Tech tinkerers keen to tussle with RISC-V will be thrilled to hear there’s an affordable new ‘toy’ in town: the BeagleV.

    The BeagleV (pronounced ‘beagle-five’) is a small single-board PC (think Raspberry Pi) that uses a RISC-V processor, touts support for several different Linux distributions (including desktop Fedora), and is priced from a comparatively cheap $119.

    For more on this device, who it’s aimed at, and what it’s specs are like, keep reading.

Comments in Slashdot

  • BeagleV is a $150 RISC-V Computer Designed To Run Linux

    Seeed Studios -- the makers of the Odyssey mini-PC -- have teamed up with well-known SBC vendor BeagleBoard to produce an affordable RISC-V system designed to run Linux. The new BeagleV (pronounced "Beagle Five") system features a dual-core, 1GHz RISC-V CPU made by StarFive -- one of a network of RISC-V startups created by better-known RISC-V vendor SiFive.

BeagleV SBC runs Linux on AI-enabled RISC-V SoC

  • BeagleV SBC runs Linux on AI-enabled RISC-V SoC

    BeagleBoard.org and Seeed unveiled an open-spec, $119-and-up “BeagleV” SBC with a StarFive JH7100 SoC with dual SiFive U74 RISC-V cores, 1-TOPS NPU, DSP, and VPU. The SBC ditches the Cape expansion for a Pi-like 40-pin GPIO.

    In our introduction to last week’s catalog of 150 Linux hacker boards we speculated that 2021 would reveal the first Linux-based community-backed board with a RISC-V processor under $200. We did not have to wait long. BeagleBoard.org, Seeed Studio, and chip designer StarFive have announced an open hardware, RISC-V based BeagleV SBC due to sample in April for $149 with 8GB RAM and ship in volume in September along with a $119 board with 4GB.

BeagleBoard.org and Seeed Introduce the First Affordable RISC-V

  • BeagleBoard.org and Seeed Introduce the First Affordable RISC-V Board Designed to Run Linux

    Seeed and BeagleBoard.org® have announced an official collaboration with the leading RISC-V solutions provider, StarFive, to create the latest member of the BeagleBoard.org® series, BeagleV™ (pronounced Beagle five). BeagleV™ is the first affordable RISC-V board designed to run Linux. BeagleV™, pushes open-source to the next level and gives developers more freedom and power to innovate and design industry leading solutions with an affordable introductory price of $149 followed by lower cost variants in subsequent releases.

    BeagleV™ will be available for early access in March with larger availability in September. The early access version encompasses StarFive Jinghong 7100 SoC with powerful AI performance (3.5T NVDLA, 1T NNE), built-in ISP, 1 Gigabit ethernet, and a dual core 64-bit SiFive U74 RISC-V CPU with 8GB of LPDDR4 memory. It also has a dedicated hardware encoder/decoder supporting H.264 and H.265 4k@60fps, making it a perfect edge computing device with powerful AI capability. Supported by mainline Linux and a Debian-based BeagleBoard.org® open-source software image, BeagleV™ is ready for development out-of-the-box and prepared for the future.

BeagleV: An Affordable RISC-V Computer Designed to Run Linux

  • BeagleV: An Affordable RISC-V Computer Designed to Run Linux

    BeagleV is a single board computer (SBC) that runs Linux out of the box. The computer has been announced by Seeed Studio and Beagleboard.org in collaboration with SiFive (Star Five).

    The BeagleV runs on a RISC-V CPU that is capable of running Linux and can also be used in edge compute applications such as training autonomous vehicles, object detection, speech processing and many more workloads related to AI.

BeagleV is a RISC-V single board PC for $150 or less

New Beagle Board Offers Dual-Core RISC-V

  • New Beagle Board Offers Dual-Core RISC-V, Targets AI Applications

    We’ve been tracking the rise of RISC-V since the ISA debuted nearly a decade ago. While the highest-performing RISC-V CPUs are still far behind their x86 or ARM equivalents, the absolute level of performance you can get from a RISC-V core is increasing rapidly. Even better, especially for those who like experimenting with new architectures, the cost is coming down.

    It’s been possible to buy a RISC-V board before this, but the options have been limited, particularly for the money you’d spend. We discussed an expensive SiFive option last year — a quad-core chip, in that case — but there’s now a much cheaper Beagle board option.

BeagleV: A powerful RISC-V single-board computer that runs Linux

  • BeagleV: A powerful RISC-V single-board computer that runs Linux from US$119

    There are many single-board computers about, but few are powerful and have RISC-V processors. The BeagleV is an example of a board that fits that criteria though, thanks to its SiFive U74 processor. The BeagleV is comparatively affordable, too. The SiFive U74 has two cores clocked at 1.5 GHz and 2 MB of L2 cache, which compete with the performance that something like an ARM Cortex-A55 processor.

    The SiFive U74 also includes an NVDLA Engine, a Vision DSP Tensilica-VP6, a Neural Network Engine and an audio processing DSP, among other components. Initial BeagleV boards will ship without a GPU, but future batches should ship with one from Imagination Technologies. According to CNX Software, BeagleV boards with GPUs should begin shipping in September 2021.

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