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IBM: Latest on Fedora 34 and Alternative to CentOS, AlmaLinux

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  • Fedora 34 To Ship An ISO With The i3 Window Manager - Phoronix

    While the i3 window manager has been around for more than a decade, it's taken until now for an i3 window manager spin of Fedora to be solicited and approved.

    Following the creation of a Fedora i3 special interest group last year, approved this week is providing an official Fedora spin with the i3 window manager in place of other desktop environments / window managers. This is the first Fedora release image to make use of a tiling window manager.

  • Fedora Looks To Overhaul Its Community Outreach - Phoronix

    In addition to pursuing many technical changes for its Linux distribution like systemd-oomd by default, Btrfs Zstd compression, and standalone XWayland releases, the Fedora project is also looking to overhaul its community outreach this year.

    Fedora's "Community Outreach Revamp" is to focus on existing outreach teams within Fedora that are "struggling to function" or need greater support for success.

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  • CloudLinux Renames Its CentOS Alternative ‘Project Lenix’ To ‘AlmaLinux’

    Last month, the CentOS team’s announcement to replace and shift full focus from CentOS Linux to its future replacement CentOS Stream led to the creation of new alternative distributions such as Rocky Linux by CentOS creator Greg Kurtzer, and Project Lenix by CloudLinux Inc.

    On the one hand, Rocky Linux targeted its first release in 2021 Q2, i.e., after March. On the other, Project Lenix aimed for 2021 Q1, i.e., before March.

    Continuing the latest development on Project Lenix, CloudLinux has now renamed this CentOS alternative as AlmaLinux.

  • Free CentOS Replacement AlmaLinux To Be Available This Quarter

    CloudLinux has named the free CentOS replacement AlmaLinux, previously code-named Project Lenix.

    Following Red Hat’s December 2020 announcement that the CentOS stable release is no longer under development, CloudLinux launched a project to deliver a drop-in replacement. The project was code-named Project Lenix.

    Project Lenix has now crystallized into AlmaLinux, a 1:1 binary compatible fork of RHEL 8, with a migration path from CentOS to AlmaLinux. Future RHEL releases will also be forked into a new AlmaLinux release.

    CloudLinux backs AlmaLinux with $1 million annual investment in development, and a commitment to supporting AlmaLinux through 2029.

  • CloudLinux readies CentOS Linux replacement: AlmaLinux | ZDNet

    When Red Hat, CentOS's Linux parent company, announced it was "shifting focus from CentOS Linux, the rebuild of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), to CentOS Stream, which tracks just ahead of a current RHEL release," the move ticked off many people. So, CloudLinux immediately announced it would create a new CentOS clone, Lenix, and that it would put over a million dollars a year behind the new Linux distribution. Now, it has a new name, AlmaLinux, and a more concrete plan.

CloudLinux Announces AlmaLinux As Their 1:1 RHEL Fork

  • CloudLinux Announces AlmaLinux As Their 1:1 RHEL Fork, Alternative To CentOS

    Following the surprise announcement last month that CentOS 8 will be discontinued at EOY2021 with CentOS Stream to be the new upstream for RHEL, several different organizations and developers have announced their intentions to create new community-oriented, open-source rebuilds of Red Hat Enterprise Linux that will be free. One of the promising announcements so far has been from CloudLinux and today they have announced it as AlmaLinux.

    CloudLinux, which provides a CentOS-based Linux distribution catering to shared hosting providers, announced in December they would be working on their own replacement to CentOS. They said this drop-in CentOS alternative would be supported by them with $1 million USD annually for development.

CloudLinux Prepares CentOS Replacement AlmaLinux

  • CloudLinux Prepares CentOS Replacement AlmaLinux

    Launching a CentOS alternative was an obvious move for the company, said Igor Seletskiy, CEO and founder of CloudLinux Inc., in the announcement. “The Linux community was in need, and the CloudLinux OS is a CentOS clone with significant pedigree—including over 200,000 active server instances. AlmaLinux is built with CloudLinux expertise but will be owned and governed by the community. We intend to deliver this forever-free Linux distribution this quarter,” he said.

AlmaLinux, a CentOS alternative is planned release by March 2021

  • AlmaLinux, a CentOS alternative is planned release by March 2021

    CloudLinux is announcing project AlmaLinux formerly known as Lenix by officially publishing its website and stating that the release will be available in the first quarter of this year- 2021.

    CentOS alternative Linux distros are now in quite searches after the announcement of RedHat, which is the life of CentOS 8 Linux going to end soon this year. Thus, it gave other companies and developers a chance to grab the users who will be coerced to adopt the paid licensing of RHEL.

    For example, CentOS’s initial developer and the founder of the CentOS project Gregory Kurtzer stated immediately after the RHEL announcement that they are coming soon with RockyLinux, based on RHEL code. And on the same path CloudLinux that already has its CentOS-based OS for hosting services announced a parallel project Lenix, that is finally now has been named “Alma Linux”. Alma is a Spanish word, means “the soul”.

Some unlikely 2021 predictions

  • Some unlikely 2021 predictions

    Support for CentOS 8 will end at the end of the year; users will have to transition to CentOS Stream or find another solution altogether. For all the screaming, CentOS Stream may well turn out to be good enough for many of the deployments that are currently using a stable CentOS build. Others are likely to find that, in this era of cloud computing, a long-term-stable distribution isn't as important as it used to be. If the "machines" running the distribution will not last for years, why does the distribution they run need such a long life? The end of CentOS could have the unintended effect of undermining the demand for ultra-stable "enterprise" distributions in general.

    There will be attempts to recreate CentOS as it was, of course; most or all of them are likely to fail. Maintaining a stable distribution for years takes a lot of work — and tedious, unrewarding work at that. CentOS struggled before Red Hat picked it up; there is no real reason to believe that its successors will have an easier time of it. The fact that the alternative with the most mindshare currently, Rocky Linux, has no publicly archived discussions and only seems to communicate on the proprietary Slack platform is also worrisome.

    For better or for worse, the Fedora project has a well-established relationship with Red Hat. The status of openSUSE is nowhere near as clear, which is one of the causes of the ongoing strife on its mailing lists over the last year. OpenSUSE will need to better define its relationship with SUSE in 2021, even if additional stresses, such as the creation of the independent openSUSE Foundation or the rumored public offering by SUSE, don't happen. Like Fedora, openSUSE is the descendant of one of our earliest and most influential distributions; it will be with us for a long time yet, but exactly how that will happen needs to be worked out.

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