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today's leftovers

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  • Three open-source giants to watch in 2021: Red Hat, SUSE, Ubuntu

    Apart from on desktop PCs used in businesses across the globe, the dominating operating systems on today’s computers are UNIX-like. The hardware that runs the world’s services, in the cloud, on the internet of things, and many phones, runs software that comprises of Linux variants and a small percentage of BSD-you-likes, typically FreeBSD. Windows Server instances still exist — estimates put the figure somewhere between 20% to 30% of servers running the OS.

    But in the main, the vast majority of operating systems, applications, databases, deployment tools, development tool-sets, and so forth comprise open-source software, which runs, usually, on UNIX-like operating systems.

    Of the Linux variants found in the data center, the three big players are Ubuntu Server (of Canonical), SUSE Linux Enterprise, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux — or variants thereon. (The word variants is often found in the free and open software world: variations or forks are rife in just about every part of open-source IT.)

  • Open-Source NVIDIA Support For Recent GPUs Is Poor But Now You Can Fake It For Testing

    The open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" Gallium3D code within Mesa has wired up DRM shim support for basically faking the support in the absence of real hardware. This is mainly useful for testing the Nouveau OpenGL shader compiler code path without any actual code execution.

    Longtime Nouveau developer Ilia Mirkin wired up support for the Nouveau_Noop DRM shim. This basically allows the Nouveau Gallium3D code to function without submitting commands to any GPU or waiting on fences.

  • Parsing HID Unit Items

    This post explains how to parse the HID Unit Global Item as explained by the HID Specification, page 37. The table there is quite confusing and it took me a while to fully understand it (Benjamin Tissoires was really the one who cracked it). I couldn't find any better explanation online which means either I'm incredibly dense and everyone's figured it out or no-one has posted a better explanation. On the off-chance it's the latter [1], here are the instructions on how to parse this item.

    We know a HID Report Descriptor consists of a number of items that describe the content of each HID Report (read: an event from a device). These Items include things like Logical Minimum/Maximum for axis ranges, etc. A HID Unit item specifies the physical unit to apply. For example, a Report Descriptor may specify that X and Y axes are in mm which can be quite useful for all the obvious reasons.

    Like most HID items, a HID Unit Item consists of a one-byte item tag and 1, 2 or 4 byte payload. The Unit item in the Report Descriptor itself has the binary value 0110 01nn where the nn is either 1, 2, or 3 indicating 1, 2 or 4 bytes of payload, respectively. That's standard HID.

  • Kiwi TCMS 9.0

    We're happy to announce Kiwi TCMS version 9.0!

  • Opinion: What open-source software can teach big pharma

    At the Diamond Light Source synchrotron in Oxford, scientists shoot electrons through rings at near light speed to produce beams ten billion times brighter than the sun. These beams are used to study everything from painting fragments to viral structures. Last year researchers at Oxford University used the synchrotron, a large machine, to work out the molecular structure of COVID-19. Instead of selling off the discovery to the highest bidder, they put the information immediately into the open domain so that scientists globally could learn how COVID-19’s proteins infect the body.

    This sharing of information has been widely used by the software industry for decades. With open-source software, engineers share their source codes openly with their counterparts, who can then tinker with the codes and produce something new. Examples of open-source software products include the internet browser Mozilla Firefox and the Linux operating system. While this model has brought enormous benefits to the software industry, medicine has been slow to catch on.

    Matthew Todd, chair of drug discovery at University College London, likens open-source medicine to Wikipedia. All data and results are shared instantly and openly with the wider scientific community. This sharing of information could have real advantages for medicine because drugs are extremely expensive to research and most do not survive phase-one clinical trials. Rather than waste time experimenting with a molecule that a competitor has already proved to be unsafe, scientists could learn about failures instantly from a public data bank and then carry on experimenting with something new. Saving time and money by learning from others’ failures could lower drug prices and get new medicines to market sooner.

    New beginnings

    Some drug companies are beginning to experiment with open-source medicine. Pharma companies AbbVie, Bayer, and Johnson & Johnson have partnered with the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC), a research organisation that studies less well-known areas of the human genome. The consortium is funded partly by drug companies and shares all of its findings openly with the public. Recently the SGC teamed up with the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill to have drugs ready for clinical trials when the next pandemic hits.

    Other drug companies are using the open-source model to help them begin researching rare diseases or illnesses that have high clinical failure rates. The associate director of global research at a pharmaceutical company says he has been given clear guidance to contact competitors and consortiums to develop shared risk models of innovation. The advantage, he says, is that by splitting the risk, more companies will be keen to invest their limited time and resources on less lucrative medicines.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 889

    nuwave bravo xl, covid, resin printers

More in Tux Machines

The March 2021 Issue of the PCLinuxOS Magazine

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the March 2021 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community. The magazine is lead by Paul Arnote, Chief Editor, and Assistant Editor Meemaw. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is released under the Creative Commons Attribution- NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0 Unported license, and some rights are reserved. All articles may be freely reproduced via any and all means following first publication by The PCLinuxOS Magazine, provided that attribution to both The PCLinuxOS Magazine and the original author are maintained, and a link is provided to the originally published article. In the March 2021 issue: * Short Topix: 10 Year Old Sudo Security Bug Patched * Repo Review: Minitube * GIMP Tutorial: Top GIMP Filters, Part 2 * H.264 vs H.265: The Evolution Of Video Codecs * Two PCLinuxOS Family Members Finally Meet * Tip Top Tips: How I Converted My H.264 Video To HEVC * PCLinuxOS Recipe Corner: Tortilla Casserole * And much more inside! This month’s cover was designed by parnote. Download the PDF (9.8 MB) https://pclosmag.com/download.php?f=2021-03.pdf Download the EPUB Version (7.1 MB) https://pclosmag.com/download.php?f=202103epub.epub Download the MOBI Version (7.2 MB) https://pclosmag.com/download.php?f=202103mobi.mobi Visit the HTML Version https://pclosmag.com/html/enter.html

Android Leftovers

SparkyLinux Finally Gets a KDE Plasma Edition, Xfce Flavor Updated to Xfce 4.16

Based on the Debian Testing repositories as of March 5th, 2021, where the development of the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 11 “Bullseye” operating system series takes place, the SparkyLinux 2021.03 release ships with Linux kernel 5.10 LTS, the Calamares 3.2.37 installer, and various updated components (see below). But what caught my attention is the fact that SparkyLinux now features a KDE Plasma edition! Until now, SparkyLinux shipped with the Xfce, LXQt, MATE, Openbox (MinimalGUI), and MinimalCLI (text-mode) editions. Read more

How to Mount Windows NTFS Partition in Linux

This is quite common for Dual Boot users who use Windows and Linux simultaneously for their work. You can easily mount Windows partitions through File Manager. When you try to mount the NTFS partition from a terminal, you will encounter an error “The disk contains an unclean file system (0, 0). Read more