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The free Tron Universe—Armagetron

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Gaming

After all these years, I still remember the sounds and primary colours associated with the climatic lightcycle scene in the 1982 Walt Disney film TRON. As the noise-ridden cycles raced to certain destruction, synthetic electronic reverberations could be felt throughout the whole audience and my bones at the cinema. Sure, since my long forgotten childhood there were a couple of well-made arcade games. However, nothing really forced those memories to the fore until my elder son played Armagetron Advanced and smashed my virtual existence into all kinds of ugly jelly shapes at great speed via my house net.

This article will explain installation and the basics of game playing. I hope you get as much fun out of what, at first glance, looks too simple to be true OpenGL game. Sit back, turn your 5.1 speakers on, set the sub woofer up high, and vibrate violently as you duck and weave to certain victory or the shadow of defeat.

Winning the local race

It sounded so simple. Steer a digitized lightcycle around an enclosed arena. Force the slightly-crazed AI competitors to crash violently into the generated walls that you so carefully leave behind your cycle’s exhaust. Achieve victory, fame and a lasting control over your own computer. So simple, no challenge you may think. How can artificial outwit the living persona of TRON, the man they call the hard straight liner. Okay, no one has called me that, but maybe they will. Well, try riding the light yourself. The pain is still fresh in my scorched fingertips. Therefore, my elder son is better. I don’t care.

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