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NVIDIA 1.0-7667 Linux Display Driver Performance

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Earlier this morning, NVIDIA publicly unveiled their new 7800 GTX (G70) GPU for immediate availability. Some of its features include CineFX 4.0, eight vertex processing units, improvements in the pixel-shader, and improved anti-aliasing. In addition, the NVIDIA G70 now uses an 110nm @ TSMC process, 80 million more transistors than the GeForce 6800, and runs at a 430MHz core / 600MHz GDDR3 clock speed. We will be bringing numerous 7800 GTX Linux reviews as the week's progress, but in the mean time, we are bringing some coverage of NVIDIA's 1.0-7667 Linux display drivers, which were also released this morning. Although this driver comparison won't be as extravagant as our NVIDIA Linux Display Driver Performance Analyzed article, which was published last month, we will be comparing these latest drivers against the 1.0-7664 and 1.0-7174 packages. Our test setup we used today contained an NVIDIA 6600GT 128MB (PCI Express) and ran on a DFI LANPARTY UT motherboard.

The gaming benchmarks we'll be running today to compare the three different drivers are Unreal Tournament 2004 and Doom 3. Similar to our last NVIDIA driver comparison, we used dm-rankin and ons-torlan with the Unreal Tournament 2004 Demo (3334). However, this time with Unreal Tournament 2004 we are going to be using UMark Linux Beta 3 with 12 bots, to run the benchmarks. In the Doom 3 benchmarking, we used the standard timedemo1. In both games, we tested each of the different drivers under various settings.

Although we only used two different games for benchmarks today, we were able to see a very diminutive, but noticable, difference among the tested drivers. Most importantly though, is that NVIDIA has provided immediate Linux support for its new G70 VPU.

Full Review.

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