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Raspberry Pi Foundation Release Their Own Silicon, the Raspberry Pi Pico

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Hardware

It was about time for the Raspberry Pi Foundation to release their own silicon, so here it is guys! Meet Raspberry Pi Pico, the result of several years of hard work designed to offer Raspberry Pi owners and anyone else who like building their own hardware high performance for integer workloads, flexible I/O, and low cost.

Raspberry Pi Pico is built on the RP2040 microcontroller chip, which features a dual-core ARM Cortex-M0+ processor running at 133MHz, 264KB of on-chip RAM, support for up to 16MB of off-chip flash memory via a dedicated QSPI bus, DMA controller, as well as interpolator and integer divider peripherals.

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Raspberry Pi Pico Announced As $4 Microcontroller

  • Raspberry Pi Pico Announced As $4 Microcontroller

    Following November's launch of the Raspberry Pi 400 keyboard computer there is another new product from the UK foundation and it's not a new Raspberry Pi SBC.

    Raspberry Pi Pico is the new product announced today and it amounts to being a $4 micro-controller. The Pico is built around the RP2040, a microcontroller chip designed by the Raspberry Pi engineers. The RP2040 features a dual-core Arm Cortex M0+ processor with 264KB of internal RAM and support for up to 16MB of off-chip flash memory.

Raspberry Pi goes MCU with open-spec Pico

  • Raspberry Pi goes MCU with open-spec Pico

    RPi Ltd. has launched a $4 “Raspberry Pi Pico” board based on an “RP2040” chip with dual Cortex-M0+. The Pico adds 2MB flash, micro-USB, and 26 GPIO. RP2040-based boards are also available from Adafruit, Arduino, Pimoroni, and SparkFun.

    The Raspberry Pi project was modeled in part on the Arduino open hardware project that continues to dominate the world of MCU hacking and computer education. Now, after invading PC territory on the high end with the Raspberry Pi 400 keyboard computer, Raspberry Pi Trading has advanced into Arduino territory — and beyond the reach of Linux — with a custom-built RP2040 MCU with dual Cortex-M0+ cores. The RP2040 that processor drives a $4, quasi-SBC board called the Raspberry Pi Pico. Third parties have also launched RP2040 based boardlets (see farther below).

Meet Pico: Raspberry Pi’s First Microcontroller Device

  • Meet Pico: Raspberry Pi’s First Microcontroller Device [Available for $4]

    Raspberry Pi is popularly known for its single board computers. Not just limited to its impressive technology, but it also makes DIY projects affordable.

    Now, with its first microcontroller-class product “Raspberry Pi Pico” for just $4, they have introduced yet another low-cost board that is potentially going to be super popular.

    Here, I’ll mention some key highlights about it and how you can get one for yourself.

Welcome Raspberry Pi to the world of microcontrollers

  • Welcome Raspberry Pi to the world of microcontrollers

    ‘Raspberry and chips,’ not something you’d like to eat but in the world of silicon it’s actually a great combination. Eben Upton recently shared with us Raspberry Pi’s exciting vision for a revolutionary product that they were working on: a microcontroller, the RP2040, based on Raspberry Pi silicon.

    The news was both disruptive and exciting at the same time. At Arduino, we love to put our hands on innovative technologies, micros, sensors and all the building blocks that allow us to fulfill our mission of making technology simple to use for everyone. The curiosity was growing and a few weeks later we were already tinkering with the initial development tools. The processor is a very intriguing beast — it’s a dual-core Cortex-M0+ microcontroller with fairly sophisticated architecture.

    Since we have been experimenting quite a bit with multi-core processors with our Pro product, the “Portenta,” we decided to build an Arduino board based on this new silicon.

  • Meet Raspberry Pi Pico, Raspberry Silicon From Raspberry Foundation [Specs]

    Raspberry Pi Pico is a micro-controller class board exclusively from Raspberry Foundation. It is it is built on brand new RP2040. According to the foundation, Raspberry Pi Pico will remain in production until at least January, 2028. You need to pay just $4 to get this beautiful device.

Raspberry Pi Pico released and available at $4 only

  • Raspberry Pi Pico released and available at $4 only

    Last year, the Raspberry Foundation also released a brand new version of the Raspberry PI PC (personal computer), and it is directly built into a small-sized keyboard. Now there is more good news for hackers and hardware developers. They just announced their first microcontroller-based product named Raspberry Pi Pico. This small device is priced at only US $4. Unbelievable price. Let us find out about Raspberry Pi Pico hardware specs and software support.

    Many hobbyists and industrial applications or IoT use a Raspberry Pi with a microcontroller. A microcontroller is different than a microprocessor, which only contains a CPU. Raspberry Pi Pico includes an integrated processor, a small amount of memory, and other stuff for your application.

$4 Raspberry Pi Pico board features RP2040 dual-core...

  • $4 Raspberry Pi Pico board features RP2040 dual-core Cortex-M0+ MCU

    The Raspberry Pi Foundation introduced the Linux capable Raspberry Pi board in 2012 to teach programming and computers. Since then, the company has introduced models with faster processors, more memory, faster interfaces, culminating with the launch of Raspberry Pi 4 in 2019. The board also comes with a 40-pin header to teach electronics, but relying on a Linux SBC to blink a LED, gather data from sensors, or controlling servos is a bit over the top. So the Raspberry Pi Foundation decided to create their own MCU board called Raspberry Pi Pico powered by RP2040 dual-core Cortex-M0+ microcontroller designed in-house by the foundation.

Lots More Coverage About Raspberry Pi Pico

  • The Raspberry Pi Pico is a tiny $4 microcontroller running off the company’s very own chip

    Those specs might go in one ear and out the other, but the best way to illustrate the potential for a new Raspberry Pi product is to see it used in something cool. The Raspberry Pi Foundation is partnering with companies like Arduino, Adafruit, and Pimoroni to integrate the new RP2040 chip into other boards and gadgets. There’s a whole list in the blog post announcing the Pico, but a few notable ones are Pimoroni’s PicoSystem game console, Adafruit’s Feather RP 2040 board, and the Arduino Nano RP2040 Connect.

  • Raspberry Pi Pico Review: ‘Pi Silicon’ Debuts on $4 Microcontroller

    Perhaps even more important than the Pico itself is Raspberry Pi Foundation’s first foray into making its own silicon. We wanted to learn more about the RP2040 so we asked James Adams, Chief Operating Officer at Raspberry Pi Trading to tell us how “Pi Silicon” was created.

    “We couldn’t see a way to offer something differentiated in the microcontroller space using existing third-party silicon, so we set out to build our own,” Adams said. “The RP2040 chip has been a long time in the making - we started initial work at the back end of 2016, we had some test silicon in our hands in September 2018 which we then reworked into the final device we use on the Raspberry Pi Pico board. The device has evolved substantially since those early days. We learned a lot from our first test silicon and I think, although it has taken a while, what we've ended up with is very exciting (in terms the architecture and performance per $) - it's a superb bit of engineering. The RP2040 chips are fabricated at TSMC on their 40nm process.”

    Adams outlined some of the advantages of the custom silicon.

  • Raspberry Pi Enters Microcontroller Game With $4 Pico

    The microcontroller in question, the RP2040, is also Raspberry Pi’s first foray into custom silicon, and it’s got a dual-core Cortex M0+ with luxurious amounts of SRAM and some very interesting custom I/O peripheral hardware that will likely mean that you never have to bit-bang again. But a bare microcontroller is no fun without a dev board, and the Raspberry Pi Pico adds 2 MB of flash, USB connectivity, and nice power management.

  • Raspberry Pi Pico, RP2040 and Adafruit family of boards

    The Raspberry Pi Pico, RP2040 and Adafruit family of boards are here! We’re doing our live broadcast at 2am EST and will be updating this page soon!

  • The Raspberry Pi Pico is a new $4 microcontroller

    tl;dr: The Raspberry Pi Pico is a new $4 microcontroller board with a custom new dual-core 133 MHz ARM Cortex-M0+ microprocessor, 2MB of built-in flash memory, 26 GPIO pins, an assortment of SPI, I2C, UART, ADC, PWM, and PIO channels.

    It also has a few other party tricks, like edge castellations that make it easier to solder the Pico to other boards.

    The Pico is powered by a new RP2040 chip—a brand new Raspberry-Pi-built ARM processor. And the best thing about this processor is the insanely-detailed Datasheet available on the Pico website that steps through every bit of the chip's architecture.

  • Raspberry Pi Pico, the first microcontroller released by Raspberry Pi Foundation, based on the new RP2040 MCU.

    Raspberry Pi Pico is the first product using Raspberry Pi’s own MCU, the RP2040. The chip features dual-core ARM Cortex-M0+ at up to 133MHz with a RAM of 256KB, 2MB flash memory, and 264K multi-bank high-performance SRAM. Designed to be a flexible, low-power, and cost-effective development platform, Raspberry Pi Pico offers on-chip PLL for variable core frequency and access to the 30 GPIO pins.

  • Raspberry Pi Pico microcontroller: specifications, features and RP2040

    The ultra-light, ultra-small Raspberry Pi Pico microcontroller board is ideal for embedding inside digital projects. Raspberry Pi Pico represents two major firsts for Raspberry Pi: it’s the first microcontroller development board from Raspberry Pi; it’s also the first device to use a silicon chip designed by Raspberry Pi’s in‑house Application-Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) team.

  • Programming Raspberry Pi Pico with Python and MicroPython

    MicroPython is an implementation of the Python programming language that is already popular among Raspberry Pi users. MicroPython is built specifically for microcontrollers like the RP2040 that powers Raspberry Pi Pico. MicroPython offers the same friendly syntax as Python. It allows for full control over Raspberry Pi Pico’s various features, including its Programmable Input/Output (PIO) functionality.

  • How to solder GPIO pin headers to Raspberry Pi Pico

    Solder the four corner pins first. Take your time, don’t rush, and remember that mistakes can always be fixed.

  • Hello Raspberry Pi Pico and RP2040!

    That's not nearly all, though, because Raspberry Pi has also enabled all of their contributors, including SparkFun, to create their own development boards that utilize the RP2040 processor. With that knowledge, we are happy to also announce today three new SparkFun Original boards with the RP2040 at their hearts.

  • Happy Pico/RP2040 Day!

    We've been low-key waiting for Eben and Raspberry Pi to do something with microcontrollers for years, and we're not disappointed in the RP2040 and the support around it. As soon as we got word, we went full-on to make the best of what we do, but for this new microcontroller. We also made a few new things that this new chip inspired us to do.

    From the 20 or so designs that made it out of the initial flurry of ideas to design stage, 10-12 are ready for launch day, and the rest will follow in the next couple of months as the dust settles and we find what you love to do with the RP2040 and Pico.

    By each category, here's what we've done in brief:

  • Introducing Raspberry Pi Pico

    Issue 39 of HackSpace magazine comes with a free Pico. You can get one at your local newsagents or online. You'll also get a free Pico if you subscribe to HackSpace from £10. If you're in the UK you can subscribe here. If you're elsewhere in the world, head here to subscribe. Alternatively, you can get one from your favourite electronics retailer for just $4 plus local taxes and shipping.

  • RP2040 in depth

    There’s quite a lot going on inside the black package of RP2040 – including two processor cores, peripherals for many protocols, and PIO – and these all need to access memory. The fully connected bus fabric gives fast and predictable performance, even when lots of things are happening at once.

  • Raspberry Pi Pico FAQ

    The Raspberry Pi Pico board design files are open-source, along with all the provided software, examples, and documentation. The internal design of the RP2040 microcontroller itself is not open-source.

NeoPixel dithering with Pico

Raspberry PI Pico: Foundation entering the micro-controllers

From ITPro

  • What is the Raspberry Pi Pico?

    It includes a dual-core ARM Cortex-M0+ processor, 264KB of on-chip RAM and support for up to 16MB off-chip Flash memory, direct memory access (DMA) controller, as well as a rich set of peripherals. The chip is also augmented with the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s unique programmable I/O (PIO) subsystem.

Getting Started with Raspberry Pi Pico using MicroPython and C

  • Getting Started with Raspberry Pi Pico using MicroPython and C

    Raspberry Pi Pico board was just launched last Thursday, but thanks to Cytron I received a sample a few hours after the announcement, and I’ve now had time to play with the board using MicroPython and C programming language.

    I went to the official documentation to get started, but I had to look around to achieve what I wanted to do, namely blinking some LEDs, so I’ll document my experience with my own getting started guide for Raspberry Pi Pico using a computer running Ubuntu 20.04 operating system. The instructions will be similar for Windows and Mac OS.

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