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Games: Godot Engine, Space Otter Charlie, Kathy Rain: Director's Cut, Stadia and More

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Gaming
  • Godot Engine - Announcing the new community map for user groups

    Starting from today, there is a new User groups page on the Godot Engine website! This page replaces the old User groups page by featuring a community map that can be freely navigated and contributed to.

    [...]

    For the curious, the map is powered by the open source Leaflet.js library and uses the Mapbox Static Tiles API. You can view the implementation in this pull request.

  • Space Otter Charlie looks like a truly charming upcoming Zero-G puzzle platformer | GamingOnLinux

    Space Otter Charlie is a Zero-G platformer puzzler with cute characters and visuals, odd weapons and it looks thoroughly charming. It's due out later in this year.

    Currently in development by Wayward Distractions, a group of game development veterans from the likes of PopCap Studios who you might know from titles like Bejeweled and Plants vs Zombies. They've teamed up with The Quantum Astrophysicists Guild for publishing now too.

    "With humanity gone, it’s up to the otters to save animal-kind from an inhospitable Earth. Join Charlie and his ragtag crew of critters on a daring mission through Otter Space as they search for a new planet to call home. Explore derelict space stations, battle unhinged robots, and enjoy some otterly terrific puns as you jump, float, and fly through over a dozen levels of furry fun."

  • Kathy Rain: Director's Cut announced and will support Linux | GamingOnLinux

    Kathy Rain: Director's Cut is the upcoming expanded and improved enhancement over the original that launched in 2016 and the developer has confirmed Linux support too.

    "Set in the 90's, Kathy Rain tells the story of a strong-willed journalism major who must come to terms with her troubled past as she investigates the mysterious death of her recently departed grandfather. Armed with her motorcycle, a pack of cigs, and a notepad, Kathy delves into a local mystery surrounding her hometown that will take her on a harrowing journey of emotional and personal turmoil."

  • Stadia has games free to try this weekend for Stadia Pro, 'Project Hailstorm' is teased | GamingOnLinux

    More new games, free games to try out on Stadia Pro from now until the end of the weekend and some super secret projects currently in the works for Stadia.

    Let's get the facts out of the way first shall we? Games and more of them. Available now are HITMAN 3 with the brand new Stadia State Share feature, and also Scott Pilgrim vs. The World - Complete Edition. Interestingly, if you have Stadia Pro you can also still claim HITMAN and HITMAN 2 which have both been given this State Share feature on Stadia now too.

  • Jumpala is an intense score-fighting highly competitive action-platformer out now | GamingOnLinux

    Jump across platforms to turn them your colour, use abilities to mess with your opponents and try to keep platforms your colour as they fall off the screen to score - Jumpala is a lot of fun.

    Developed by Yokereba Games, this is a "first-class" Linux game developed by a long time Linux user who mentioned how they "consider it a Linux-first game since most of my testing was done on my main machine".

  • Team17 have acquired the full rights to Golf With Your Friends

    Seems January is the time for acquisitions! Following the news recently of YoYo Games (GameMaker Studio) being acquired by Opera, we now have Team17 buying the full rights to Golf With Your Friends ("GWYF"). This was made public today, January 21, in Team17's latest investor announcement.

    Golf With Your Friends is a fun take on Miniature / Crazy Golf that can be played in solo, local multiplayer or online with a bunch of others. Released out of Early Access in May 2020. Team17 were the publisher with Blacklight Interactive developing it at the time. Now though, as per the financial statement, Team17 now control "all rights and assets for GWYF" and it mentions plans to extend the game including with DLC and mentions potential sequels. The game rights were purchased for £12 million and will be paid entirely in cash with £9m right away and another £3m within 12 months.

More in Tux Machines

TVs With Linux and Raspberry Pi Latest

  • From Plex to Jellyfin Media Server

    I migrated away from Plex just a week before its much over-publicized “security issues” last month. I just want to go on the record and say that my decision had nothing to do with this incident. The “security issue” boiled down to Plex not behaving ideally on mismanaged and insecure network configurations. In my opinion, Plex isn’t to blame for security errors in network configurations made by inexperienced network administrators.

  • The first Rockchip RK3566 TV box is out with H96 Max running Android 11

    Rockchip RK3566 is a quad-core Cortex-A55 processor with plenty of peripherals designed for AIoT and NVR applications. While it still supports features like high-dynamic range or video post-processing, it’s not really optimized for TV boxes, but this has not stopped the maker of H96 Max “8K UltraHD” TV box to launch an RK3566 model with 4GB RAM and 8GB RAM now sold for respectively $59.99 and $76.99 on Banggood.

  • Raspberry Pi Pico – Vertical innovation
  • Linux 5.13 To Support HDMI CEC With The Raspberry Pi 4

    While the 5.12 merge window hasn't even been closed for a full week yet, there is already the first DRM-Misc-Next pull request heading into DRM-Next with the first batch of feature material aiming for the Linux 5.13 kernel cycle. This initial batch of DRM-Misc-Next includes the removal of TTM memory management and Medfield support from the GMA500 "Poulsbo" driver that goes along with the rest of the Linux kernel dropping the Intel MID support for 5.12 and lingering remnants being removed with 5.13. There is also i.MX8MM support added to the MSXFB driver among many other random changes to these smaller drivers.

AMD Linux 5.12 and Linux 5.10.20

Ubuntu: Unbreaking Unbootable Ubuntu, Snaps Shrunk and More

  • Unbreaking Unbootable Ubuntu

    I run Ubuntu Hirsute - the development release which will become 21.04 - on a bunch of systems. It’s a trade-off though, getting the latest crack each and every day. Being at the bleeding edge of new packages landing means I can experience brand new shiny bugs on my systems. Bugs like 1915579 which rendered my system unbootable.

  • Honey, I Shrunk the Snap! | Ubuntu

    The year is 1989. I bought a computer game called F-16: Combat Pilot, a flight simulator featuring free-flight, five types of single-player missions, a full campaign mode, serial-port multiplayer, and then some. Gloriously wrapped in four colors and magnetized on two single-density 5.25-inch floppy disks. Total size: 680 KB. Nowadays, it is not uncommon for individual applications to weigh dozens if not hundreds of megabytes. But it doesn’t have to be that way. In Linux, you can save some space by using libraries that are shared across multiple applications (hence their name, shared libraries). When it comes to self-contained application formats like snaps, the tables are turned once again, as snaps bundle all the necessary dependencies inside, and thus take more disk space. If you want to make your snapped applications as small and lean as possible, we have a few neat suggestions. [...] The final artifact of the snap build process is a compressed squashFS file, with the .snap suffix. Originally, snaps were compressed using the xz algorithm, for highest compatibility with the widest range of devices. More recently, in order to help speed us snap launch times, we also introduced the use of the lzo algorithm, which results in 2-3x application startup times improvements. The main reason for this is the lesser compression used in lzo compared to xz, meaning the system needs fewer CPU cycles, and thus less time, to uncompress the snap on the system. However, it also introduces size inflation. [...] Disk utilization matters less now than it did a decade or two ago, but you can still try to make your applications small and tidy. This also helps reduce bandwidth usage, improves portability, and if you’re using system backups, reduces the time needed to copy all the relevant data. With snaps, there are many ways you can trim down on the digital excess, including the use of extensions, sparing use of necessary runtime dependencies, and pruning the extras from the prime directory. Not only will your snaps be smaller in size, you will also ensure higher consistency, better system integration and improve the application startup time. All these are important, highly noticeable elements of the user experience. If you have any other suggestions or ideas on how to conserve space or optimize snap creation, please join our forum and share your thoughts.

  • Canonical keynote at Embedded World 2021: Bosch Rexroth achieves complete IoT automation with Ubuntu Core

    series that’s already being used in the current stable release, Ubuntu 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla). But that good news I want to share with you today is the fact that Ubuntu 21.04 will also offer several apps from the GNOME 40 stack.

  • Bad Voltage 3×24: Weaponised Rooster

    Stuart Langridge, Jono Bacon, and special guest star Alan Pope present Bad Voltage, in which we are large and in charge, there is ancient history about electricians and phones...

IBM/Red Hat: Kafka Monthly Digest, Red Hat Upselling, and Cockpit 239

  • Kafka Monthly Digest – February 2021

    This is the 37th edition of the Kafka Monthly Digest! In this edition, I’ll cover what happened in the Apache Kafka community in February 2021.

  • 5 ways Red Hat Insights can improve your sysadmin Life

    The way we do things is changing fast. This has become a necessity as our systems get more complex, our workloads evolve, and our deployments rapidly grow in size. Thanks to the innovations brought about by openness and collaboration, we can develop tools and services to cope with these quickly evolving times. For us to reap the benefits of these advancements, we should open ourselves to carefully exploring how various tools suit our requirements and fit into or change our norms. By doing so, we may simplify a lot of our mundane tasks, reduce overhead, and address the major pain points in our operations. Having worked as a sysadmin in the past, I've discovered many automation tools and services that have made my life easier. One of the most recent is Red Hat Insights. In this article, I share five ways this service that is included with your Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) subscription can improve your life as an admin.

  • Cockpit Project: Cockpit 239

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from Cockpit version 239.