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Sharing and Free Software Leftovers

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GNU
  • 10 fabulous free apps for working with audio, video, and images

    You want Photoshop-like features without the Photoshop-like price tag, and, for that, there’s Gimp. Free, open-source, and available for Windows, Mac, and Linux, this powerful tool can be used by graphic designers, photographers, and illustrators alike.

  • Gnuastro 0.14 released
    Dear all,
    
    I am happy to announce the availability of Gnuastro 0.14. For the full
    list of added and changed/improved features, see the excerpt of the
    NEWS file for this release in [1] below.
    
    Gnuastro is an official GNU package, consisting of various
    command-line programs and library functions for the manipulation and
    analysis of (astronomical) data. All the programs share the same basic
    command-line user interface (modeled on GNU Coreutils). For the full
    list of Gnuastro's library, programs, and a comprehensive general
    tutorial (recommended place to start using Gnuastro), please see the
    links below respectively:
    
    https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual/html_node/Gnuastro-library.html
    https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual/html_node/Gnuastro-programs-list.html
    https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual/html_node/General-program-usage-tutorial.html
    
    The most prominent new feature may be the new Query program (called
    with 'astquery'). It allows you to directly query many large
    astronomical data centers (currently VizieR, NED, ESA and ASTRON) and
    only download your selected columns/rows. For example with the command
    below you can download the RA, Dec and Parallax of all stars in the
    Gaia eDR3 dataset (from VizieR) that overlap with your
    'image.fits'. You just have to change '--dataset' to access any of the
    +20,000 datasets within VizieR for example! You can also search in the
    dataset metadata from the command-line, and much more.
    
      astquery vizier --dataset=gaiaedr3 --overlapwith=image.fits \
               --column=RAJ2000,DEJ2000,Plx
    
    See the new "Query" section in the Gnuastro book for more:
    
    https://www.gnu.org/software/gnuastro/manual/html_node/Query.html
    
    Here is the compressed source and the GPG detached signature for this
    release. To uncompress Lzip tarballs, see [2]. To check the validity
    of the tarballs using the GPG detached signature (*.sig) see [3]:
    
      https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gnuastro/gnuastro-0.14.tar.lz    (3.6MB)
      https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gnuastro/gnuastro-0.14.tar.gz    (5.6MB)
      https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gnuastro/gnuastro-0.14.tar.gz.sig (833B)
      https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gnuastro/gnuastro-0.14.tar.lz.sig (833B)
    
    Here are the MD5 and SHA1 checksums:
    
    30d77e2ad1c03d4946d06e4062252969  gnuastro-0.14.tar.gz
    f3ddbc4b5763ec2742f9080d42b69ed3  gnuastro-0.14.tar.lz
    cfbcd4b9ae1c5c648c5dc266d638659f0117c816  gnuastro-0.14.tar.gz
    4e4c6b678095d2838f77b2faae584ea51df2d33c  gnuastro-0.14.tar.lz
    
    I am very grateful to (in alphabetic order) Pedram Ashofteh Ardakani,
    Thérèse Godefroy, Raúl Infante-Sainz, Sachin Kumar Singh, Samane Raji
    and Zahra Sharbaf for directly contributing to the source of Gnuastro
    since the last alpha-release. It is great that in this release we have
    an equal gender balance in the contributors. I sincerely hope this can
    continue in the next release :-).
    
    I am also very grateful to (in alphabetic order) Antonio Diaz Diaz,
    Paul Eggert, Andrés García-Serra Romero, Thérèse Godefroy, Bruno
    Haible, Martin Kuemmel, Javier Licandro, Alireza Molaeinezhad, Javier
    Moldon, Sebastian Luna Valero, Samane Raji, Alberto Madrigal, Carlos
    Morales Socorro, Francois Ochsenbein, Joanna Sakowska, Zahra Sharbaf,
    Sachin Kumar Singh, Ignacio Trujillo and Xiuqin Wu for their very
    useful comments, suggestions and bug fixes that have now been
    implemented in Gnuastro since the last alpha-release.
    
    If any of Gnuastro's programs or libraries are useful in your work,
    please cite _and_ acknowledge them. For citation and acknowledgment
    guidelines, run the relevant programs with a `--cite' option (it can
    be different for different programs, so run it for all the programs
    you use). Citations _and_ acknowledgments are vital for the continued
    work on Gnuastro, so please don't forget to support us by doing so.
    
    This tarball was bootstrapped (created) with the tools below. Note
    that you don't need these to build Gnuastro from the tarball, these
    are the tools that were used to make the tarball itself. They are only
    mentioned here to be able to reproduce/recreate this tarball later.
      Texinfo 6.7
      Autoconf 2.70
      Automake 1.16.2
      Help2man 1.47.17
      ImageMagick 7.0.10-59
      Gnulib v0.1-4396-g3b732e789
      Autoconf archives v2019.01.06-98-gefa6f20
    
    The dependencies to build Gnuastro from this tarball on your system
    are described here:
      https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual/html_node/Dependencies.html
    
    Best wishes,
    Mohammad
    
  • LibreOffice Community Member Monday: Felipe Viggiano and Zhenghua Fong

    In the future, I would like to start contributing more with others teams, and with TDF in order to help increase LibreOffice’s success. In my opinion, LibreOffice needs to be better known – we have a great free office solution that attends the majority of the requirements of the general public, but, at least in Brazil, many people are not aware of this!

  • ISA2 Launches New Open Source Bug Bounties

    Awards of up to EUR 5000 are available for finding security vulnerabilities in Element, Moodle and Zimbra, open source solutions used by public services across the European Union. There is a 20% bonus for providing a code fix for the bugs they discover.

  • Amazon Creates ALv2-Licensed Fork of Elasticsearch

    Amazon states that their forks of Elasticsearch and Kibana will be based on the latest ALv2-licensed codebases, version 7.10. “We will publish new GitHub repositories in the next few weeks. In time, both will be included in the existing Open Distro distributions, replacing the ALv2 builds provided by Elastic. We’re in this for the long haul, and will work in a way that fosters healthy and sustainable open source practices—including implementing shared project governance with a community of contributors,” the announcement says.

  • Elasticsearch and Kibana are now business risks

    In a play to convert users of their open source projects into paying customers, today Elastic announced that they are changing the license of both Elasticsearch and Kibana from the open source Apache v2 license to Server Side Public License (SSPL). If your organisation uses the open source versions of either Elasticsearch or Kibana in its products or projects, it is now at risk of being forced to release its intellectual property under terms dictated by another.

  • Wikipedia Turns Twenty

    If there is a modern equivalent to Encyclopédie for cultural impact, scale of content, and controversy, it’s surely Wikipedia, the free open-source online encyclopedia run by the not-for-profit Wikimedia Foundation. Started by entrepreneurs Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger on January 15th, 2001, it has since grown to become one of the world’s top 15 websites with a vast database of 55 million articles in 317 languages, as well as a family of related projects covering everything from travel guides to recipes. Beloved of geeks, friend to lazy students and journalists alike, and bane to procrastinators, it celebrates its 20th birthday this month.

    It’s hard to overstate just how much information is on Wikipedia. You can instantly find the average July temperature in Lisbon, the difference between an ale and a lager, the historical background to the Fifth Amendment of the United States Constitution, or the full list of 10 ways a batsman can be out in cricket. The illustrated article on aguaxima includes far more information than Diderot’s effort, and readers can find a far more accurate article on religion in Sweden. These articles all link to their sources, so a reader can do their own fact-checking.

    There is one more crucial difference between Encyclopédie and Wikipedia, though. Encyclopédie’s subscribers needed to pay 280 livres for it, far beyond the wages of an ordinary person. But anyone who can afford a device with an Internet connection can access Wikipedia wherever they go. This accessibility was game-changing.

More in Tux Machines

Events: GNOME, LF, and Linux App Summit (LAS)

  • Felipe Borges: Save the date: GNOME LATAM 2021, March 27th

    I’m happy to spread the word that a GNOME event in Spanish and Portuguese is taking place this month, on the 27th of March. It will be a free virtual event with talks and panels where everybody is welcome.

  • Cloud Foundry Summit 2021: Call For Papers Open

    The Summit will allow European attendees to participate, as well, with sessions tailored to the virtual format. The Cloud Foundry Foundation will join forces with the community-elected program committee to curate a program that fosters collaboration among attendees and offers interactive platform education.

  • The Linux App Summit (LAS) returns in May, applications open for talks until March 15 | GamingOnLinux

    Planned to happen online again during May 13-15, the Linux App Summit (LAS) is set to return giving you a chance to listen to talks about the future of application design, development and more for Linux. Last year had some pretty interesting talks, like Linux game porter and FNA developer Ethan Lee giving a presentation on how games get built and packages plus Collabora gave an overview of their work with Valve.

CoreELEC 19.0 “Matrix” Linux Distro Released for Amlogic Hardware Based on Kodi 19

As its codename suggests, CoreELEC 19.0 “Matrix” is the first release of this LibreELEC fork to be based on the recently released Kodi 19.0 “Matrix” open-source home theater software, which introduces numerous new featiures and improvements for those who want to make their own media center PC or HTPC. Based on the CoreELEC 9.2.6 Amlogic-NG release, the CoreELEC 19.0 series becomes the active development branch, supporting only Amlogic-NG devices like LaFrite, LePotato, ODROID-C4, ODROID-HC4, and ODROID-N2. Read more

Mozilla Leftovers

  • A Better Terminal for Mozilla Build [Ed: Mozilla is moving in a bad direction that serves Windows, not standards or the open Web or software freedom]

    If you’re working with mozilla-central on Windows and followed the official documentation, there’s a good chance the MozillaBuild shell is running in the default cmd.exe console. If you’ve spent any amount of time in this console you’ve also likely noticed it leaves a bit to be desired. Standard terminal features such as tabs, splits and themes are missing. More importantly, it doesn’t render unicode characters (at least out of the box).

  • Mozilla Open Policy & Advocacy Blog: India’s new intermediary liability and digital media regulations will harm the open internet

    Last week, in a sudden move that will have disastrous consequences for the open internet, the Indian government notified a new regime for intermediary liability and digital media regulation. Intermediary liability (or “safe harbor”) protections have been fundamental to growth and innovation on the internet as an open and secure medium of communication and commerce. By expanding the “due diligence” obligations that intermediaries will have to follow to avail safe harbor, these rules will harm end to end encryption, substantially increase surveillance, promote automated filtering and prompt a fragmentation of the internet that would harm users while failing to empower Indians. While many of the most onerous provisions only apply to “significant social media intermediaries” (a new classification scheme), the ripple effects of these provisions will have a devastating impact on freedom of expression, privacy and security.

  • Karl Dubost: Capping User Agent String - followup meeting [Ed: Hopefully enough people understand the degree to which use agents in a Web browser are leveraged for fingerprinting/tracking/surveillance/abuse]

    A couple of weeks ago, I mentionned the steps which have been taken about capping the User Agent String on macOS 11 for Web compatibility issues. Since then, Mozilla and Google organized a meeting to discuss the status and the issues related to this effort. We invited Apple but probably too late to find someone who could participate to the meeting (my bad). The minutes of the meeting are publicly accessible.

Security Leftovers

  • Is Your Browser Extension a Botnet Backdoor?

    A company that rents out access to more than 10 million Web browsers so that clients can hide their true Internet addresses has built its network by paying browser extension makers to quietly include its code in their creations. This story examines the lopsided economics of extension development, and why installing an extension can be such a risky proposition.

  • Security updates for Tuesday [LWN.net]

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (bind, intel-ucode, ipmitool, isync, openssl, python, python-cryptography, python-httplib2, salt, tar, and thrift), Fedora (ansible, salt, webkit2gtk3, and wpa_supplicant), Oracle (bind), Red Hat (bind, kernel, and kpatch-patch), Scientific Linux (bind), SUSE (firefox, gnome-autoar, java-1_8_0-ibm, java-1_8_0-openjdk, nodejs10, open-iscsi, perl-XML-Twig, python-cryptography, and thunderbird), and Ubuntu (bind9).

  • Malicious NPM packages target Amazon, Slack with new dependency attacks [Ed: Microsoft delivering malware again, but the media (actually a Microsoft propaganda site in this case) does not mention Microsoft (similar to this)]

    Last month, BleepingComputer reported that security researcher Alex Birsan earned bug bounties from 35 companies by utilizing a new flaw in open-source development tools.

  • Working Spectre exploits for Windows and Linux devices uncovered

    A security researcher has discovered several working Spectre exploits that were uploaded to the VirusTotal database last month. Spectre, along with Meltdown, are two extremely severe hardware vulnerabilities that affect Intel, IBM POWER, and some ARM-based processors. While Intel has since implemented hardware mitigations for the vulnerability in newer processors, older ones have to rely on software fixes that come with a performance penalty, which prevents its blanket use. This means that there’s still a large number of systems that are vulnerable to the recently discovered exploits by security researcher Julien Voisin.