Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

RealPlayer Flaws Trigger PC Hijack Alert

Filed under
Security

Digital-media delivery company RealNetworks on Thursday rolled out patches for four high-risk vulnerabilities in its flagship RealPlayer software, warning that the flaws put millions of users at risk of PC hijack attacks.

The Seattle, Wash.-based RealNetworks Inc. said the flaws can be exploited by remote attackers to execute arbitrary commands with the privileges of the logged-in user.

he company issued a high-risk alert and confirmed that all four flaws affect RealPlayer 10 and 10.5, RealOne Player versions 1 and 2 and RealPlayer 8.

RealPlayer Enterprise, the configurable version of RealPlayer designed for enterprise deployments, the Rhapsody 3 music service and the open-source Linux and Helix versions are also affected, the company warned.

The most serious of the four flaws could allow an attacker to create a malicious MP3 file to allow the overwriting of a local file or execution of an ActiveX control on a vulnerable machine.

RealNetworks said a malicious RealMedia file that used RealText could also be used as an attack mechanism to cause a heap overflow. This could allow an attacker to execute arbitrary code on a target machine.

A third vulnerability was described as buffer-overflow error in the "vidplin.dll" file that does not properly handle specially crafted AVI files. This could be exploited via malicious Web sites to execute arbitrary commands with the privileges of the logged-in user, RealNetworks said.

The company said a fourth vulnerability could be combined with default settings of earlier Internet Explorer browsers and exploited by a malicious Web site to create a local HTML file and then trigger an RM file to play which would then reference the local HTML file.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

15 books for kids who (you want to) love Linux and open source

In my job I've heard professionals in tech, from C-level executives to everyone in between, say they want their own kids to learn more about Linux and open source. Some of them seem to have an easy time with their kids following closely in their footsteps. And some have a tough time getting their kids to see what makes Linux and open source so cool. Maybe their time will come, maybe it won't. There's a lot of interesting, valuable stuff out there in this big world. Read more

Security: VPNFilter, Encryption in GNU/Linux, Intel CPU Bug Affecting rr Watchpoints

  • [Crackers] infect 500,000 consumer routers all over the world with malware

    VPNFilter—as the modular, multi-stage malware has been dubbed—works on consumer-grade routers made by Linksys, MikroTik, Netgear, TP-Link, and on network-attached storage devices from QNAP, Cisco researchers said in an advisory. It’s one of the few pieces of Internet-of-things malware that can survive a reboot. Infections in at least 54 countries have been slowly building since at least 2016, and Cisco researchers have been monitoring them for several months. The attacks drastically ramped up during the past three weeks, including two major assaults on devices located in Ukraine. The spike, combined with the advanced capabilities of the malware, prompted Cisco to release Wednesday’s report before the research is completed.

  • Do Not Use sha256crypt / sha512crypt - They're Dangerous

    I'd like to demonstrate why I think using sha256crypt or sha512crypt on current GNU/Linux operating systems is dangerous, and why I think the developers of GLIBC should move to scrypt or Argon2, or at least bcrypt or PBKDF2.

  • Intel CPU Bug Affecting rr Watchpoints
    I investigated an rr bug report and discovered an annoying Intel CPU bug that affects rr replay using data watchpoints. It doesn't seem to be hit very often in practice, which is good because I don't know any way to work around it. It turns out that the bug is probably covered by an existing Intel erratum for Skylake and Kaby Lake (and probably later generations, but I'm not sure), which I even blogged about previously! However, the erratum does not mention watchpoints and the bug I've found definitely depends on data watchpoints being set. I was able to write a stand-alone testcase to characterize the bug. The issue seems to be that if a rep stos (and probably rep movs) instruction writes between 1 and 64 bytes (inclusive), and you have a read or write watchpoint in the range [64, 128) bytes from the start of the writes (i.e., not triggered by the instruction), then one spurious retired conditional branch is (usually) counted. The alignment of the writes does not matter, and it's not related to speculative execution.

In Memoriam: Robin "Roblimo" Miller, a Videographer and Free Software Champion

Videographer Robin Roblimo Miller

Robin "Roblimo" Miller was a clever, friendly, and very amicable individual who everyone I know has plenty of positive things to say about. I had the pleasure of speaking to him for several hours about anything from personal life and professional views. Miller was a very knowledgeable person whose trade as a journalist and video producer I often envied. I have seen him facing his critics in his capacity as a journalist over a decade ago when he arranged a debate about OOXML (on live radio). Miller, to me, will always be remembered as a strong-minded and investigative journalist who "did the right thing" as the cliché goes, irrespective of financial gain -- something which can sometimes be detrimental to one's longterm health. Miller sacrificed many of his later years to a cause worth fighting for. This is what we ought to remember him for. Miller was - and always will be - a FOSS hero.

May everything you fought for be fulfilled, Mr. Miller. I already miss you.

Today in Techrights