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Linux Foundation and the US Military

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  • Darpa, Linux Foundation create open software initiative to accelerate US 5G stack

    The Linux Foundation said it entered a collaboration agreement with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (Darpa) to create open source software. Darpa and the LF will create a broad collaboration umbrella that allows US government projects, their ecosystem and the open-source community to participate in accelerating innovation and security in the areas of 5G, edge, AI, standards, programmability and IoT, among other technologies.

  • Linux Foundation, DARPA collaborate on open source for 5G | FierceWireless

    The Linux Foundation has signed an agreement with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to establish an open source project for the U.S. government.

    The agreement calls for the Linux Foundation and DARPA to work together in the areas of 5G, edge, artificial intelligence, standards, programmability and IoT, among other technologies.

  • DARPA, Linux Foundation Partner to Advance 5G - Nextgov

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is partnering with a major technology consortium to establish an open-source software development collaboration ecosystem to advance emerging technologies such as 5G, according to a Wednesday press release.

    The Linux Foundation, a nonprofit organization that hosts open-source efforts including Kubernetes and the O-RAN Alliance’s software community, signed a cooperative research and development agreement, or CRADA, with DARPA to create a “broad collaboration umbrella” called US Government Open Programmable and Secure, or US GOV OPS. DARPA’s Open Programmable Secure 5G, or OPS-5G, effort will be the first project included under the umbrella, according to the release.

  • DARPA, Linux Foundation team for government 5G | Light Reading

    The Linux Foundation (LF), the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced it has signed a collaboration agreement with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to create open source software that accelerates United States government technology research and development innovation.

    Under the agreement, DARPA and the LF will create a broad collaboration umbrella (US Government Open Programmable Secure (US GOV OPS) that allows United States Government projects, their ecosystem, and open community to participate in accelerating innovation and security in the areas of 5G, Edge, AI, Standards, Programmability, and IOT among other technologies. The project formation encourages ecosystem players to support US Government initiatives to create the latest in technology software.

More military ties

Linux Foundation working with/for the US Army

  • DARPA starts a 5G open-source stack project with the Linux Foundation

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has begun a broad collaboration with the Linux Foundation, hoping to spur open-source development of technologies for use by the U.S. government that include secure 5G network software and applications.

    The US GOV OPS (Open Programmable, Secure) umbrella organization’s first project, OPS-5G, will focus on a software stack for 5G, the network edge and IoT. According to a newly established website about the project, OPS-5G will define and test an “end-to-end 5G stack” and include elements from multiple Linux Foundation projects, including LF Networking, LF Edge, Zephyr Project and Cloud Native Computing Foundation, along with other top-tier projects that call the Linux Foundation home.

    “The project formation encourages ecosystem players to support U.S. government initiatives to create the latest in technology software,” according to DARPA and the Linux Foundation. According to the two organizations, OPS-5G’s goal is to “create open source software and systems enabling secure end to end 5G and follow-on mobile networks” and address “feature velocity” in open-source software, mitigate security concerns such as large-scale botnets that leverage IoT devices, network slicing on “suspect gear” and “adaptive adversaries operating at scale.”

Conflating US Army with “US”

  • US taps Linux Foundation to boost open 5G

    The US Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) teamed with the Linux Foundation to boost development of open 5G, edge, AI and IoT technologies, a move the consortium’s CRO and COO Mike Woster told Mobile World Live (MWL) reflected increased interest from governments worldwide.

    Their deal covers creation of a new US Government Open Programmable Secure (US GOV OPS) initiative to function as a standard open source programme governed by the Linux Foundation.

    The first project in the programme will focus on using open source software and systems to create a secure end-to-end 5G reference architecture to deliver the ability to rapidly rollout new features, mitigate large-scale botnet and other threats, and deploy secure network slices which can operate on untrusted infrastructure.

The Linux Foundation and DARPA...

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    This works even if the person is covering the pad with their hands.

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