Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

New changes to Twitter make it even worse for free software users

Filed under
GNU
Web

There are many complicated debates happening right now around Twitter and its role in public discourse. These discussions are important, but we also shouldn't forget a very basic and clear principle -- whatever its policies are about who can and can't post or how, it's of fundamental importance that Twitter should not require users to run nonfree software in order to use the site.

Unfortunately, on December 15th, Twitter removed its "legacy" Web interface. As opposed to its much larger and more complex default Web client, the legacy interface did not use proprietary JavaScript (or any JavaScript).

Previously, the Free Software Foundation (FSF) could tolerate the use of Twitter because of this legacy interface. While it was active, we referred free software advocates to it, or to third-party free software applications. Twitter's removing access to this interface means that users are forced to use the site's nonfree JavaScript if they don't have a dedicated desktop or mobile client, preventing freedom-respecting browsers like GNU IceCat from posting to the service.

But why use Twitter in the first place, if we know that it has these issues? As any charity can attest, engaging users on social media is one of the chief ways of getting their message across. The same is true for software freedom. We need to be talking about free software in places where everyone is not already a committed free software supporter -- we won't be successful if we are only in our own echo chamber, or preaching to the choir. It's important for us as activists to be reaching the people on these platforms, even if we have some reservations about using them ourselves. Twitter has its share of issues, but until we're able to drive enough users to the software freedom movement to where we can rely solely on word of mouth, we need to include them in our messaging strategy. We are, however, careful to make sure that you don't have to follow the FSF on Twitter in order to receive news or updates. Everything we publish is also posted on platforms based on free software principles, including Mastodon and GNU social.

Read more

the EvilNess of JavaScript (DON’T BE EVIL TWITTER) strikes …

  • the EvilNess of JavaScript (DON’T BE EVIL TWITTER) strikes … again!

    most users probably don’t care X-D

    twitter was updated and now, even viewing hashtags is impossible without JavaScript turned on (there used to be a functional version without javascript).

    JavaScript has developed from “it’s so great, the first true cross-platform language aka runs everywhere where there is a browser” to a massively mass privacy problem (intrusive spying bitch of pain in the ass catastrophe).

    from now on, content will only go to https://nerdpol.ch/

    (but even there js is mandatory to view it X-D!? #wtf? there really should be a NoScript.net (nice js blocking addon for Firefox) compatible version of this)

    only possibility: turn https://gnusocial.network (last time checked, it was kind of php-slow X-D) into a better twitter

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

     
  • What is Raspberry Pi 4 “Model B”? [Ed: I'm still waiting for them to formally apologise for going behind customers' backs, making secret deals with Microsoft to put Microsoft malware on all those devices]

    Raspberry Pi has conquered the world of SoC (System on a Chip). It has already garnered millions of followers since its release in 2012. Not only is it inexpensive, but it’s also versatile, modular, and multi-purpose. It has become popular not only as a credit-sized computer board but also as a controller in electronic, robotics, and IoT projects. The size, features, and price drive the popularity of the Pi, especially in the DIY community. To keep up with the current technological trends, the tiny board has undergone plenty of upgrades over the years, and there have been many varieties so it can cater to the needs and demands of its users. In 2019, the Raspberry Pi Foundation released the fourth generation of the multi-purpose board, the Raspberry Pi 4 B. It is the most powerful Pi to date, sporting huge upgrades from its predecessors. The compact board is touted to deliver a PC-level performance, and it didn’t disappoint.

  • Kentaro Hayashi: Grow your ideas for Debian Project

    There may be some "If it could be ..." ideas for Debian Project. If idea is concreate and worth to make things forward, it should make a proposal for Project Funding. [...] I'm not confident whether mechanism works, but Debian needs change.

  • Sam Thursfield: Calliope, slowly building steam

    There are some interesting complexities to this, and in 12 hours of hacking I didn’t solve them all. Firstly, Bandcamp artist and album names are not normalized. Some artist names have spurious “The”, some album names have “(EP)” or “(single)” appended, so they don’t match your tags. These details are of interest only to librarians, but how can software tell the difference? The simplest approach is use Musicbrainz, specifically cpe musicbrainz resolve-ids. By comparing ids where possible we get mostly good results. There are many albums not on Musicbrainz, though, which for now turn up as false positives. Resolving Musicbrainz IDs is a tricky process, too — how do we distinguish Multi-Love (album) from Multi-Love (single) if we only have an album name? If you want to try it out, great! It’s still aimed at hackers — you’ll have to install from source with Meson and probably fix some bugs along the way. Please share the fixes!

  • Neovide Is A Graphical Neovim Client Written In Rust

    Neovide is a really cool GUI client for Neovim. Although it essentially functions like Neovim in the terminal, Neovide does add some nice graphical improvements such as cursor animations and smooth scrolling. It even has me thinking about making it my new "vim" alias.

Linux 5.11.13, 5.10.29, 5.4.111, 4.19.186, 4.14.230, 4.9.266, and 4.4.266

Get involved with Mageia, become a Packager

With Mageia 8 just released and development for Mageia 9 getting underway in Cauldron, the unstable branch of Mageia, now is a great time to get involved with packaging. We are starting to look at the features that we want to include for Mageia 9, and as it is so early in the development cycle, now is the time for major developments, or big updates to key pieces of software. This is a great time to join the project as you can propose features you would like to see, help to implement large changes or see how a distribution evolves through development, stabilisation and then is released. If there is an application that you are interested in, if you want to help maintain part of the distribution, or if you want to learn something new, there are many opportunities to do so with the packaging team. Read more

Google does not want you to tell your players about your donation page

I recently updated Pixel Wheels banner image on Google Play. That triggered a review of the game: shortly after the update I received a message telling me Pixel Wheels was "not compliant with Google Play Policies". What nefarious activity does the game engage in? Sneak on users? Mine bitcoins? [...] Meanwhile you can still get the game from F-Droid or itch.io, since they do not have a problem with a link to a donation page. Read more