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GNU Poke Reaches 1.0

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  • Release notes for poke 1.0
    I am happy to announce the first release of GNU poke, version 1.0.
    
    The tarball poke-1.0.tar.gz is now available at
    https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/poke/poke-1.0.tar.gz.
    
      GNU poke (http://www.jemarch.net/poke) is an interactive,
      extensible editor for binary data.  Not limited to editing basic
      entities such as bits and bytes, it provides a full-fledged
      procedural, interactive programming language designed to describe
      data structures and to operate on them.
    
    This release is the product of 3 years of work resulting in 4126
    commits, made by 19 contributors.
    
    The program is far from being perfect and there are known bugs and
    limitations in place.  We also have lots of awesome ideas still to be
    implemented, extensions we want to add, pickles for many data formats
    to write, documentation to improve, and lots of work in
    progress... the GUI, the machine-interface... working in poke is so
    fun that it is difficult to stop :'D
    
    But it is time to start the releasing cycles so everyone can benefit
    from poke, which is already immensely useful for many activities like
    systems programming, testing of software, design and documentation of
    file formats and protocols, reverse engineering, and much more.
    Releasing often will hopefully also bring in more developers to our
    little but enthusiastic community... there is so much to do!
    
    In any case, we wish you have fun with poke and that you find it
    useful.
    
    Please send us comments, suggestions, bug reports, *patches*,
    questions, complaints, bitcoins, or whatever, to poke-devel@gnu.org.
    
    Many of the poke developers and users populate the #poke IRC channel
    at irc.freenode.net, and you are more than welcome to join us there
    and say hello.
    
    Now it is time to mention the names of all the people who have
    contributed with code and/or documentation to this release.  In
    certain but no significant order they are:
    
       John Darrington
       Tim Rühsen
       Luca Saiu
       Bruno Haible
       Mohammad-Reza Nabipoor
       Eric Blake
       Egeyar Bagcioglu
       Kostas Chasialis
       Darshit Shah
       Dan Čermák
       David Faust
       Carlo Caione
       Henner Zeller
       Aurelien Aptel
       Indu Bhagat
       Darkstar
       Michael Drüing
       Pierre-Evariste Dagand
    
    My gratitude to you all!  It is a real pleasure to hack with you.
    
    Finally, as a personal note, I would like to dedicate this release to
    my father Eduardo.  For this is also your work in a sense, and I love
    you very much.
    
    And this is all for now.
    Happy poking!
    
  • GNU poke 1.0 released

    Version 1.0 of GNU poke is out. "GNU poke (http://www.jemarch.net/poke) is an interactive, extensible editor for binary data. Not limited to editing basic entities such as bits and bytes, it provides a full-fledged procedural, interactive programming language designed to describe data structures and to operate on them."

  • GNU poke 1.0 released
  • GNU Poke 1.0 Released For Poking At Binary Data

    The newest GNU project seeing its first release is GNU Poke, which is being inaugurated at v1.0 after being in development for the past three years.

    GNU Poke 1.0 is an interactive editor for binary data that beyond basic editing capabilities has an integrated, interactive programming language for describing data structures and operating on them. There is a GUI in the works for Poke along with many other features planned but after the initial three years of development they feel it's now in good enough shape for declaring a 1.0 release.

GNU Poke 1.0 Is Released

  • GNU Poke 1.0 Is Released

    Poke is a new interactive editor for binary data with a full-fledged procedural, interactive programming language designed to describe data structures and to operate on them. This is the first release after 3 years of work by 19 contributors.

    [...]

    It is supposed to be a binary editor, so there is probably some way to make actual edits using Poke. Perhaps you're supposed to use the extract, copy and save commands somehow. Perhaps not. The mystery remains unsolved. You can probably solve it if you are a GNU and/or computer scientist.

GNU Poke 1.0

  • This Week In Security: Text Rendering On Windows, GNU Poke, And Bitsquatting | Hackaday

    The good folks at GNU have minted the 1.0 release of poke, a new binary editing tool. The real killer feature of poke is that it can interpret binary data, decoding it back into readable data structures. If you’re familiar with the way Wireshark can decode packets and give useful, organized output, it seems that poke will provide a similar function, but not limited to network traffic.

    It looks like it could become a useful tool for getting a look inside otherwise opaque binaries. What poke brings is a system where you can write pretty-printing templates on the fly, which should be very useful when mapping out an unfamiliar binary. Distros will likely pick up and start packaging poke in the coming weeks, making it even easier to get and play with.

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