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Load Balance your internet traffic over two providers

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Howtos

If you have two internet providers, and want to balance the load between them, you can use your Linux Box for doing that, you do not need a big machine, an old one can do the job. You can even decide which route to Internet will have more or less load.

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Load Balance your internet traffic over two providers

Pleas tell me how to load balance our internet traffic over two providers

re: Load Balance

What a load - that has NOTHING to do with internet load balancing.

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