Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Open Hardware: Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and RISC-V/ESP32-C3

Filed under
Hardware

  • Arduino Blog » Monitor your hoverboard’s power draw with this Arduino-based meter/logger

    If you look at your car’s dashboard, there’s a good chance you’ll find an efficiency rating for how you’re driving. However, what if you instead ride a hoverboard? This functionality is certainly not stock equipment, yet Niklas Roy wanted to understand the power consumption of his transporter during different riding situations. For that reason, he decided to develop a power monitor that not only graphs his stats when scooting around, but records the data for later viewing and analysis.

    Roy’s handheld device is controlled by an Arduino Nano and utilizes a Hall effect ammeter for current sensing. The measurements are shown as numbers and as oscillograms on a 1.8” TFT screen, which can also be logged to the display’s built-in SD card. An RTC module provides timestamp information for these readings, which can be produced using Processing and overlaid on video.

  • STM32U5 Cortex-M33 MCU gets more performance, 2D graphics accelerator, and advanced security

    The new family has a higher 160 MHz clock speed, up to 2048 KB flash, up to 786 KB RAM, a 2D graphics accelerator, several peripherals have been upgraded, and a new autonomous mode lets DMA and peripherals keep working while most of the device sleeps in order to save power.

    [...]

    The board also comes with 512-Mbit octal-SPI Flash memory, 64-Mbit octal-SPI PSRAM, 256-Kbit I2C EEPROM, as well as ARDUINO Uno V3, STMod+, and Pmod expansion connectors, plus an expansion connector for a camera module, and STLink-V3E embedded debugger.

  • Pi Day at the Raspberry Pi Foundation
  • Hello RISC-V! We got samples of the new ESP32-C3 module and it is only 13×17 mm

    We got some engineering samples of ESP32-C3 modules.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Best Free Android Apps: Joplin – note taking and to-do application

There’s a strict eligibility criteria for inclusion in this series. See the Eligibility Criteria section below. Joplin is a free, open source note taking and to-do application, which can handle a large number of notes organized into notebooks. The notes are searchable, can be copied, tagged and modified. Read more

How I digitized my CD collection with open source tools

The restrictions on getting out and about during the pandemic occasionally remind me that time is slipping by—although some days, "slipping" doesn't quite feel like the right word. But it also reminds me there are more than a few tasks around the house that can be great for restoring the sense of accomplishment that so many of us have missed. One such task, in my home anyway, is converting our CD collection to FLAC and storing the files on our music server's hard drive. Considering we don't have a huge collection (at least, by some people's standards), I'm surprised we still have so many CDs awaiting conversion—even excluding all the ones that fail to impress and therefore don't merit the effort. Read more

Hyperbola Linux Review: Systemd-Free Arch With Linux-libre Kernel

In the last month of 2019, the Hyperbola project took a major decision of ditching Linux in favor of OpenBSD. We also had a chat with Hyperbola co-founder Andre Silva, who detailed the reason for dropping Hyperbola OS and starting a new HyperbolaBSD. HyperbolaBSD is still under development and its alpha release will be ready by September 2021 for initial testing. The current Hyperbola GNU/Linux-libre v0.3.1 Milky Way will be supported until the legacy Linux-libre kernel reaches the end of life in 2022. I thought of giving it a try before it goes away and switches to BSD completely. Read more