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Linux Mint Monthly News – February 2021

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Ubuntu

An announcement was made last week to explain why security updates are important and to remind people to update their computer.

If you haven’t read it yet please visit https://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=4030.

We started working on improvements for the Update Manager. In the next release the manager won’t just look for available updates, it will also keep track of particular metrics and be able to detect cases where updates are overlooked. Some of these metrics are when was the last time updates were applied, when was the last time packages were upgraded on the system, for how many days has a particular update been shown…

In some cases the Update Manager will be able to remind you to apply updates. In a few of them it might even insist. We don’t want it to be dumb and get in your way though. It’s here to help. If you are handling things your way, it will detect smart patterns and usages. It will also be configurable and let you change the way it’s set up.

We have key principles at Linux Mint. One of them is that this is your computer, not ours. We also have many use cases in mind and don’t want to make Linux Mint harder to use for any of them.

We’re still forming strategies and deciding when and how the manager should make itself more visible so it’s too soon to speak about these aspects and get into the details which probably interest you the most here. So far we worked on making the manager smarter and giving it more information and more metrics to look at.

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Last week the Linux Mint project shared the troubling news

  • Linux Mint's Update Manager To Encourage Users To Apply Security Updates

    Last week the Linux Mint project shared the troubling news how many of its users are behind on important security updates or in some cases even running end-of-life versions. In trying to help address the issue, Linux Mint is working on improvements to its Update Manager to encourage users to apply updates.

Clickbait

  • Linux Mint developers will force updates on users like Microsoft does with Windows 10 [Ed: Brian Fagioli is lying. This headline is false and contradicted by what the body of the article says. Unnecessary clickbait. Read the original from Linux Mint's blog.]

    Did you catch that? Regarding the Linux Mint update manager, Lefebvre says "it might even insist" that users install some updates. So, yes, Linux Mint may soon be insisting, or forcing, its users install software they may not want. You know what? That may not be a bad thing. Look, Mint users are often acting irresponsibly, and if forced updates make them safer, maybe that is acceptable.

Linux Mint team wants users to upgrade, may enforce some

  • Linux Mint team wants users to upgrade, may enforce some

    Last month, the Linux Mint team published a post on the organization's official blog about the importance of installing security updates on machines running the Linux distribution.

    The essence of the post was that a sizeable number of Linux Mint devices was running outdated applications, packages or even an outdated version of the operating system itself.

    A sizeable number of devices run on Linux Mint 17.x, according to the blog post, a version of Linux Mint that reached end of support in April 2019.

    A new blog post, published yesterday, provides information on how the team plans to reduce the update reluctance of Linux Mint users.

FUD and lies about Linux Mint (misrepresentation) now shoved in

Linux Mint May Resort to Windows 10-Style Forced Updates

  • Linux Mint May Resort to Windows 10-Style Forced Updates

    Linux Mint is considering measures to keep users up-to-date, including Windows 10-style forced updates.

    Linux Mint is a popular, community-driven distribution (distro) based on Ubuntu. Unfortunately, like users of other operating systems (OS), many Linux Mint users are slow to update, both applications and the OS itself.

    In a blog post detailing the problem, the Linux Mint teams notes that only 30% of users updated to the latest version of their web browser in less than a week. Similarly, while acknowledging it is hard to get an exact figure, between 5% and 30% of users are running Linux 17.x.

nux Mint starts pushing updates

  • Linux Mint starts pushing updates

    Linux Mint will start pushing updates in the same popular way that Microsoft does with Windows 10.

    Last month the Mint team noted that a sizeable number of Linux Mint devices was running outdated applications, packages or even an outdated version of the operating system.

    A sizeable number of devices run on Linux Mint 17.x which was end of lifed in April 2019. A new blog post, published yesterday, provides information on how the team plans to reduce the update reluctance of Linux Mint users.

Linux Mint may start pushing high-priority patches to users

  • Linux Mint may start pushing high-priority patches to users

    Community Linux distributions are easygoing with updates and patches. Yes, they'd like you to update, but they don't insist on it. Now, though, the popular Linux Mint distribution has had enough of people running out-of-date distributions and programs. In the future, Mint's Update Manager may "insist" you make important security updates.

    [...]

    Yes, Linux tends to be more secure than other operating systems, but that doesn't mean there have been no serious security bugs. For example, a decade-old sudo bug has recently been patched, and the ancient -- but always troublesome -- memory addressing tool set_fs() was finally removed. As lead Mint maintainer Clement "Clem" Lefebvre wrote, you must update not just because an outdated system is vulnerable, "it is known to be vulnerable."

    Besides, Update Manager doesn't just patch Linux bugs, it also updates and patches all software on your Linux system. So, for example, when you update Linux Mint, you're also updating the default Firefox web browser.

Friendly Reminder From The Linux Mint Team: Update...

  • Friendly Reminder From The Linux Mint Team: Update Your Computer (And Teach Others How)

    Clem from the Linux Mint team issued a reminder that we should all update our computers last month. It is good advice because "Security updates are very important". We can add that you should teach friends and family how to update their system if you install GNU/Linux on their machines, and the Linux community needs to make upgrades between major versions of GNU/Linux distributions a whole lot easier.

    [...]

    The Linux-focused TV channel Linux Lounge recently brought up a good point in a recent video: The assumption that GNU/Linux users know how to maintain and update their computer systems may be wrong. Quite a few of us have installed a user-friendly GNU/Linux distribution on a family-members computer and said "Good luck" with the assumption the machine will remain safe and secure and free from computer-viruses forever.

    The recent blog post from the Linux Mint team titled "Update your computer!" reminds us that there are a lot of Linux users out there who stick with outdated GNU/Linux distributions for years after they are reach their End-Of-Life and security updates, and other updates, stop coming. Those people are probably running even older software, they are probably not the types of people who kept their distribution up-to-date when it did get regular updates. Some are probably running the exact same base system they got when they originally installed their GNU/Linux distribution.

Linux Mint emits fix for memory-gobbling Cinnamon

  • Linux Mint emits fix for memory-gobbling Cinnamon – and future version may insist on some updates

    The Linux Mint team has introduced a fix for a memory leak it does not fully understand: restarting the Cinnamon desktop.

    Cinnamon is a desktop environment which began as a fork of GNOME 3 and is developed primarily for Linux Mint, though there are also non-Cinnamon flavours of Mint, using MATE (based on GNOME 2) or the lightweight XFCE.

    The memory usage for Linux Mint is meant to be “between 80MB to 1GB” according to founder Clem Lefebvre’s latest post; but there are cases where memory consumption continues to grow, even when the operating system is sitting idle, consuming “2GB, 4GB, 6GB of RAM. We don’t know what causes these leaks yet but we’ll have a workaround in Cinnamon 5.0,” he said.

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