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Debian Development Reports and More

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  • Utkarsh Gupta: FOSS Activites in February 2021

    This was my 26th month of active contributing to Debian. I became a DM in late March 2019 and a DD on Christmas ‘19! \o/

    This month was a nice mix of amusement, excitement, nervousness, and craziness. More on it below.
    Anyway, whilst I was super-insanely busy this month, I still did some Debian stuff here and there. Here are the following things I worked on:

  • Ben Hutchings: Debian LTS work, January/February 2021

    In January was assigned 7 hours of work by Freexian's Debian LTS initiative and carried over 8.5 hours from earlier months. However, I only used 0.25 hours of these to write December's report. In Feburary I was assigned another 16 hours to work, and have worked 19 hours. I will carry over the remaining hours to March.

  • Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities February 2021

    This month I didn't have any particular focus. I just worked on issues in my info bubble.

  • Open sourcing my blog [Ed: Ouch. Outsourcing to Microsoft proprietary software as "open sourcing" (in Planet Debian)]

    I have received a lot of positives feedback for my blog lately, and I do really appreciate it and try to integrate the suggestions to update my posts and make things better.

    With the aim of continous improvement of this blog, I have decided (a bit late?) to open source it. The source code is now available on Github!

More in Tux Machines

reTerminal – A Raspberry Pi CM4 based 5-inch HMI Terminal

Seeed Studio has just unveiled reTerminal HMI terminal that reminds me of the company’s Wio Terminal based on Microchip SAMD51 Arm Cortex-M4F microcontroller with a 2.4-inch display. But as we’ll look into the details, reTerminal is quite a different beast as a Linux-capable device powered by a Raspberry Pi CM4 module with up to 8GB RAM, equipped with a 5-inch capacitive touchscreen display, and supporting plenty of connectivity options from GIgabit Ethernet to WiFi to LoRaWAN. Read more

today's howtos

  • LFCA: Learn Binary and Decimal Numbers in Network – Part 10

    In Part 9 of the LFCA series, we covered the basics of IP addressing. To better understand IP addressing, we need to pay more attention to these two types of IP address representation – binary and decimal-dotted quad notation. As mentioned earlier, an IP address is a 32-bit binary number that is usually represented in decimal format for ease of readability. The binary format uses only the digits 1 and 0. This is the format that your computer comprehends and through which data is sent across the network. However, to make the address human-readable. It is conveyed in a dotted-decimal format which the computer later converts into binary format. As we stated earlier, an IP address is made up of 4 octets. Let’s dissect the IP address 192.168.1.5.

  • 6 advanced tcpdump formatting options

    The final article in this three-part tcpdump series covers six more tcpdump packet capturing trick options.

  • 5 Funny Commands to use in Linux and Terminal

    Not everything in Linux is serious, fortunately we can find fun programs created for the sole purpose of entertaining us. You may be wondering why? Well, because we are human and at the end of the day we need a little variety, laughter and maybe a drink on the train. And yes, speaking of the train, let’s introduce you to the first fun command-type application in Linux.

  • Ubuntu Blog: Should you ever reinstall your Linux box? If so, how?

    Broadly speaking, the Linux community can be divided into two camps – those who upgrade their operating systems in-vivo, whenever there is an option to do so in their distro of choice, and those who install from scratch. As it happens, the former group also tends to rarely reinstall their system when problems occur, while the latter more gladly jump at the opportunity to wipe the slate clean and start fresh. So if asked, who should you listen to? The question of system management in Linux is a complex one, with as wide a range of answers as there are distributions. In this blog post, we discuss the concept of reinstall, and whether it’s necessary. Then, we address several other closely related ideas like system imaging, full disk encryption, and data backups. [...] System problems are an unfortunate side effect of software usage. With some luck and operational discipline, you can avoid most of them. When they do happen, you want to know what to do. Reinstalling your Linux system is always an option, but it’s usually not necessary, even for various difficult, complex problems. Even if you do decide to reinstall, you should consider using a live session to inspect the system or perform any last-minute backups, have a solid backup procedure in place regardless, and weigh the benefits of encryption against your day-to-day needs and risks. System images can also help you reduce the hassle of getting back to speed when you do decide to “reset” your distro. That’s all we have on Linux reinstallations. If you have any comments or suggestions, please join our forum, and let us know your thoughts.

Star Labs Launches Coreboot Configurator for Its Linux Laptops

After many months of hard work, last month, Star Labs finally added support for installing the Coreboot open-source firmware in its Star LabTop Mk IV and Star LabTop Mk III Linux laptops, giving users faster boot times and a more secure boot experience where they have full control over their hardware. Today, Star Labs announced a new version of Coreboot that fixes various bugs, along with Coreboot Configurator, a new app that lets owners of its Linux-powered laptops to change various settings of the Coreboot open-source firmware via the nvramtool command-line utility. Read more

Proxmox Backup Server 1.1

We are happy to announce version 1.1 of Proxmox Backup Server! The enterprise backup solution for backing up and restoring VMs, containers, and physical hosts seamlessly integrates into the virtualization management platform Proxmox Virtual Environment, allowing users to simply add a server as a new storage target. Read more Also Debian based: Rocket.Chat Desktop