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How to ‘un-google’ your Chromium browser experience

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Google
Slack

On March 15th 2021, Google is going to block non-Google chromium-based browsers from accessing certain ?private Google Chrome web services? by unilaterally revoking agreements made with 3rd parties in the past.
Meaning, every Chromium based product not officially distributed by Google will be limited to the use of only a few public Google Chrome web services.
The most important service that remains open is ?safe browsing?. The safe browsing feature identifies unsafe websites across the Internet and notifies browser users about the potential harm such websites can cause.

The most prominent feature which will be blocked after March 15th is the ?Chrome Sync?. This Chrome Sync capability in Chromium based browsers allows you to login to Google?s Sync cloud servers and save your passwords, browsing history and bookmarks/favorites to your personal encrypted cloud vault inside Google?s infrastructure.
Extremely convenient for people who access the Internet using multiple devices (like me: Chrome on a few Windows desktops, Chromium on several Slackware desktops and laptop and Chrome Mobile on my Android smartphone) and who want a unified user experience in Chrome/chromium across all these platforms.

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Difficult for people to make (and maintain) stuff based on Chro*

  • Speeding up Chrome's release cycle

    For more than a decade, Chrome has shipped a new milestone every 6 weeks, delivering security, stability, speed and simplicity to our users and the web. As we have improved our testing and release processes for Chrome, and deployed bi-weekly security updates to improve our patch gap, it became clear that we could shorten our release cycle and deliver new features more quickly. Because of this, we are excited to announce that Chrome is planning to move to releasing a new milestone every 4 weeks, starting with Chrome 94 in Q3 of 2021.
    Additionally, we will add a new Extended Stable option, with milestone updates every 8 weeks. Extended Stable will be available to enterprise administrators and Chromium embedders who need additional time to manage updates. Security updates on Extended Stable will be released every two weeks to fix important issues, but those updates won’t contain new features or all security fixes that the 4 week option will receive.

  • Chrome Moving To A 4-Week Release Cycle

    Google has been delivering new Chrome milestone releases on a six week cycle for more than one decade while moving ahead they are shifting to a four-week cycle.

    It was at the end of 2019 that Mozilla began shifting Firefox to a 4-week cycle and starting later this year Chrome will be doing the same.

Chromium Is Moving To A 4-Week Release Cycle In Q3 2021

  • Chromium Is Moving To A 4-Week Release Cycle In Q3 2021

    Google, the company in control of the Chromium web browser codebase used as a basis for Chromium, Microsoft Edge, the Brave Web Browser and many, many more, feels confident enough in their testing and release processes to cut the release-cycle for new major Chromium releases down from six to four weeks.

    The new release-schedule will go into effect starting with Chromium 94 in Q3 2021. Google will begin offering "Extended Stable" releases with an eight week release-cycle for developers using the Chromium codebase and enterprise-customers using the proprietary Google Chrome product. The "Extended Stable" branch will receive security-updates on a bi-weekly schedule.

    Mozilla Firefox has had a four-week release-cycle since 2019. Mozilla Firefox is currently at version 86, the latest stable Chrome/Chromium release is currently at version 89. It is an odd coincidence that Firefox would have overtaken Chrome/Chromium and gotten the higher version number if it were not for this sudden change in Chromiums release-cycle.

Chrome release cycle accelerated to four-weekly frenzy

  • Chrome release cycle accelerated to four-weekly frenzy

    The Chromium crew has revved its engines and decided it will soon emit a new stable release every four weeks and create a new type of release for those who are built for comfort rather than speed.

    “For more than a decade, Chrome has shipped a new milestone every six weeks,” opens a post by Alex Mineer, technical program manager for Chrome operations.

    “As we have improved our testing and release processes for Chrome, and deployed bi-weekly security updates to improve our patch gap, it became clear that we could shorten our release cycle and deliver new features more quickly.”

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