Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Installation And First Look At Mageia 8

    Mageia is a GNU/Linux distribution that is a community project begin life as Mandrake, which then became Mandriva, which then became Mageia. This is a rpm-based distro that uses a static release model and is known for stability.

  • OpenShot: Windows Movie Maker Of Linux - YouTube

    OpenShot is one of those video editors that everyone tries at least once, and I feel like it should stay at only once. While it's not unusable you could get some work done with it, it has some serious limitations as a video editor that take all the fun out of making videos.

  • Google Patches Actively-Exploited Flaw in Chrome Browser

    A flaw (CVE-2021-21166) in the Audio component of Google Chrome is fixed in a new update being pushed out to Windows, Mac and Linux users.

    Google has fixed a high-severity vulnerability in its Chrome browser and is warning Chrome users that an exploit exists in the wild for the flaw.

    The vulnerability is one of 47 security fixes that the tech giant rolled out on Tuesday in Chrome 89.0.4389.72, including patches for eight high-severity flaws.

  • GOGGLES: Democracy dies in darkness, and so does the Web

    This paper proposes an open and collaborative system by which a community, or a single user, can create sets of rules and filters,called Goggles, to define the space which a search engine can pull results from. Instead of a single ranking algorithm, we could have as many as needed, overcoming the biases that a single actor (the search engine) embeds into the results. Transparency and openness, all desirable qualities, will become accessible through the deep re-ranking capabilities Goggles would enable. Such system would be made possible by the availability of a host search engine, providing the index and infrastructure, which are unlikely to be replicated without major development and infrastructure costs. Besides the system proposal and the definition of the Goggle language, we also provide an extensive evaluation of the performance to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach. Last but not the least, we commit the upcoming Brave search engine to this effort and encourage other xsearch engine providers to join the proposal.

  • hipSYCL Sees Work-In-Progress Support For Intel oneAPI Level Zero Backend

    hipSYCL, the innovative implementation of Khronos' SYCL for targeting CPUs and GPUs by integrating with existing toolchains, is seeing work on supporting Intel oneAPI Level Zero for running directly off Intel graphics hardware.

    The open-source hipSYCL project already supports SYCL CPU-based execution via OpenMP, targeting NVIDIA GPUs using CUDA, and targeting AMD Radeon graphics using HIP/ROCm. Now with a new work-in-progress back-end is support for Intel graphics using Level Zero. The hipSYCL project is one of several SYCL implementations aiming to support various CPUs and GPUs/accelerators while so far it's been one of the most diverse. The hipSYCL project supports most of SYCL 2020 at present.

  • The Apache News Round-up: week ending 5 March 2021 : The Apache Software Foundation Blog

    Welcome, March! We've had a great week within the Apache community.

  • Is your Cloud infrastructure securely configured?

    The trend toward deploying security as part of the DevOps process has been shifting left the security and compliance processes. The DevSecOps practices have introduced processes to inspect application-code, Docker, and Kubernetes. These practices have allowed teams to detect and fix security issues faster and provide high-quality and compliant code.

    Still, many admins of Cloud accounts are securing account configuration by configuring an account via a UI, running a configuration assessment scan, and then fixing any issues found. While this might lead eventually to a securely configured account, they are essentially experimenting with an account until it becomes secure.

  • Delivering more flexible and tailored cloud-native management with the latest version of Red Hat Advanced Cluster Management for Kubernetes

    Today, we’re pleased to announce the general availability of Red Hat Advanced Cluster Management for Kubernetes 2.2, which delivers even greater integration and customization to how enterprises manage cloud-native workloads and environments. This latest release simplifies and streamlines operations and captures additional performance metrics to ensure optimization of Red Hat OpenShift clusters.

    Introduced in the summer of 2020, Advanced Cluster Management for Kubernetes enables organizations to manage multiple Kubernetes clusters and automate multi-cluster application deployments across the hybrid cloud. As the industry’s leading enterprise Kubernetes platform, Red Hat OpenShift is a crucial component in how organizations build a more agile hybrid cloud, and Advanced Cluster Management for Kubernetes helps these enterprises get the most out of these deployments by extending and scaling Red Hat OpenShift clusters.

  • OpenBSD/loongson on the Lemote Fuloong

    This machine uses the same CPU than the Yeeloong, a Loongson 2F which is a single-core MIPS-III 64-bit processor running at 800/900 MHz.

    As hinted in my previous article, contrarily to the Yeeloong, the Fuloong is less strict with the type of RAM it accepts, and my device is happily running with a Kingston 2GB DDR2 SO-DIMM module (ASU256X64D2S800C6), replacing the original 512MB module.

  • waylandmar21

    While struggling with Pfizer second dose side effects yesterday, with little ability to do anything serious – so surreal to have a fever yet also certainty you’re not actually ill[1] – I thought I’d try building the branch of Emacs with native Wayland support, and try starting up Sway instead of i3. I recently upgraded my laptop to Debian bullseye, as I usually do at this stage of our pre-release freeze, and was wondering whether bullseye would be the release which would enable me to switch to Wayland.

    Why might I want to do this? I don’t care about screen tearing and don’t have any fancy monitors with absurd numbers of pixels. Previously, I had been hoping to cling on to my X11 setup for as long as possible, and switch to Wayland only once things I want to use started working worse on X11, because all the developers of those things have stopped using X11. But then after upgrading to bullseye, I found I had to forward-port an old patch to xfce4-session to prevent it from resetting SSH_AUTH_SOCK to the wrong value, and I thought to myself, maybe I could cut out some of the layers here, and maybe it’ll be a bit less annoying. I have a pile of little scripts trying to glue together xfce4 and i3 to get all the functionality I need, but since there have been people who use their computers for similar purposes to me trying to make Sway useful for quite some time now, maybe there are more integrated solutions available.

    I have also been getting tired of things which have only ever half-worked under X, like toggling autolock off when there isn’t fullscreen video playing (when I’m video conferencing on another device, I often want to prevent my laptop’s screen from locking, and it works most of the time, but sometimes still locks, sigh). I have a “normalise desktop” keybinding which tries to fix recurrent issues by doing things like restarting ibus, and it would be nice to drop something so hackish.

  • Robert Kaiser: Mozilla History Talk @ FOSDEM

    The FOSDEM conference in Brussels has become a bit of a ritual for me. Ever since 2002, there has only been a single year of the conference that I missed, and any time I was there, I did take part in the Mozilla devroom - most years also with a talk, as you can see on my slides page.

    This year, things were a bit different as for obvious reasons the conference couldn't bring together thousands of developers in Brussels but almost a month ago, in its usual spot, the conference took place in a virtual setting instead. The team did an incredibly good job of hosting this huge conference in a setting completely run on Free and Open Source Software, backed by Matrix (as explained in a great talk by Matthew Hodgson) and Jitsi (see talk by Saúl Ibarra Corretgé).

  • An Introduction to WebAssembly

    WebAssembly, also called Wasm, is a Web-optimized code format and API (Application Programming Interface) that can greatly improve the performances and capabilities of websites. Version 1.0 of WebAssembly, was released in 2017, and became an official W3C standard in 2019.

    The standard is actively supported by all major browser suppliers, for obvious reasons: the official list of “inside the browser” use cases mentions, among other things, video editing, 3D games, virtual and augmented reality, p2p services, and scientific simulations. Besides making browsers much more powerful than JavaScript could, this standard may even extend the lifespan of websites: for example, it is WebAssembly that powers the continued support of Flash animations and games at the Internet Archive.

    WebAssembly isn’t just for browsers though; it is currently being used in mobile and edge based environments with such products as Cloudflare Workers.

    [...]

    There are more and more programming language communities that are supporting compiling to Wasm directly, we recommend looking at the introductory guides from webassembly.org as a starting point depending what language you work with. Note that not all programming languages have the same level of Wasm support, so your mileage may vary.

  • NXP i.MX 9 processors to integrate Arm Ethos U-65 microNPU, EdgeLock secure enclave

    NXP i.MX 6 and i.MX 8 processors are widely used in industrial boards and systems-on-module, and the company has now teased a new family with i.MX 9 processors integrating Arm Ethos-U65 1 TOPS microNPU, as well as the company’s EdgeLock secure enclave for increased security.

    The company did not provide that many technical details, so we still don’t know which CPU cores, GPU, and exact peripherals will be found in the processor. But we do know the i.MX 9 processors will be manufactured with a 16/12nm FinFET class of process technology optimized for low power, and features the “Energy Flex” architecture that combines “heterogeneous domain processing (independent applications processor and real-time domains with a separate low-power multi-media domain), design techniques, and process technology to maximize performance efficiency”. That means most blocks of the processor can be turned off for low power audio or CAN networking use cases, and other industrial applications requiring fast boot, defined as sub-100 milliseconds boot time.

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

     
  • What is Raspberry Pi 4 “Model B”? [Ed: I'm still waiting for them to formally apologise for going behind customers' backs, making secret deals with Microsoft to put Microsoft malware on all those devices]

    Raspberry Pi has conquered the world of SoC (System on a Chip). It has already garnered millions of followers since its release in 2012. Not only is it inexpensive, but it’s also versatile, modular, and multi-purpose. It has become popular not only as a credit-sized computer board but also as a controller in electronic, robotics, and IoT projects. The size, features, and price drive the popularity of the Pi, especially in the DIY community. To keep up with the current technological trends, the tiny board has undergone plenty of upgrades over the years, and there have been many varieties so it can cater to the needs and demands of its users. In 2019, the Raspberry Pi Foundation released the fourth generation of the multi-purpose board, the Raspberry Pi 4 B. It is the most powerful Pi to date, sporting huge upgrades from its predecessors. The compact board is touted to deliver a PC-level performance, and it didn’t disappoint.

  • Kentaro Hayashi: Grow your ideas for Debian Project

    There may be some "If it could be ..." ideas for Debian Project. If idea is concreate and worth to make things forward, it should make a proposal for Project Funding. [...] I'm not confident whether mechanism works, but Debian needs change.

  • Sam Thursfield: Calliope, slowly building steam

    There are some interesting complexities to this, and in 12 hours of hacking I didn’t solve them all. Firstly, Bandcamp artist and album names are not normalized. Some artist names have spurious “The”, some album names have “(EP)” or “(single)” appended, so they don’t match your tags. These details are of interest only to librarians, but how can software tell the difference? The simplest approach is use Musicbrainz, specifically cpe musicbrainz resolve-ids. By comparing ids where possible we get mostly good results. There are many albums not on Musicbrainz, though, which for now turn up as false positives. Resolving Musicbrainz IDs is a tricky process, too — how do we distinguish Multi-Love (album) from Multi-Love (single) if we only have an album name? If you want to try it out, great! It’s still aimed at hackers — you’ll have to install from source with Meson and probably fix some bugs along the way. Please share the fixes!

  • Neovide Is A Graphical Neovim Client Written In Rust

    Neovide is a really cool GUI client for Neovim. Although it essentially functions like Neovim in the terminal, Neovide does add some nice graphical improvements such as cursor animations and smooth scrolling. It even has me thinking about making it my new "vim" alias.

Linux 5.11.13, 5.10.29, 5.4.111, 4.19.186, 4.14.230, 4.9.266, and 4.4.266

Get involved with Mageia, become a Packager

With Mageia 8 just released and development for Mageia 9 getting underway in Cauldron, the unstable branch of Mageia, now is a great time to get involved with packaging. We are starting to look at the features that we want to include for Mageia 9, and as it is so early in the development cycle, now is the time for major developments, or big updates to key pieces of software. This is a great time to join the project as you can propose features you would like to see, help to implement large changes or see how a distribution evolves through development, stabilisation and then is released. If there is an application that you are interested in, if you want to help maintain part of the distribution, or if you want to learn something new, there are many opportunities to do so with the packaging team. Read more

Google does not want you to tell your players about your donation page

I recently updated Pixel Wheels banner image on Google Play. That triggered a review of the game: shortly after the update I received a message telling me Pixel Wheels was "not compliant with Google Play Policies". What nefarious activity does the game engage in? Sneak on users? Mine bitcoins? [...] Meanwhile you can still get the game from F-Droid or itch.io, since they do not have a problem with a link to a donation page. Read more