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KDE Commit Digest 51: Phonon, Decibel, and KsirK

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Since our good friend liquidat is taking a vacation, on a business trip, or having a kidney removed, I thought I'd try to brief folks on the latest KDE commit digest.

Things look like they are progressing along on the road to KDE4. First up is a new game called KsirK. It's a strategy game much like the old board game Risk! You young whippersnappers might not remember board games, but the object of this game is to conquer the World by means of something similar to warfare. To quote the digest,

The game has two modes: conquer the World or reach a goal like conquering two given continents. This is done through attacking your neighbors with your armies. At the beginning of the game, countries are distributed to all the players. Each country contains one army (represented by an infantryman). Each player has some armies to distribute to his countries. Note that five armies are represented by a cavalryman and 10 by a cannon. On each turn, each player can attack his neighbours, eventually conquering one or more countries. At the end of each turn, some bonus armies are distributed to the players relative to the number of countries they own.

And we were given this nice little teaser screenshot:

In other gaming news, a new developer to the KDE team plans to cut his teeth on a port of Ksnake to KDE 4. Some other games being tweaked include KShisen, kgoldrunner, and kbattleship.

In the area of communications, lots of bug fixes were committed for Kmail as well as some new cool features:

  • folder drag'n'drop, allowing to copy or move (nearly) any folder

  • search result drag'n'drop
  • local subscription for disconnected IMAP accounts, allowing to mix online and disconnected IMAP on the same account.
  • inline viewing of MS-TNEF attachments

Another exciting development was the inclusion of a new blogging library called "kblog." This suggests that we could expect some new cool blogging tools in KDE 4.

Ksnapshot has seen improvements in the area of regional select. The wait time has been decreased by 50%, from 100ms to 50ms.

Oxygen got some visual and component updates and composite effects has been tweaked to provide a couple of nicer shadow effects.

ktorrent and kget also got some improvements. ktorrent now can offer to save to alternative locations. kget got a new skeletal transfercontainer class, that doesn't really do anything right now, but in preparation for future developments.

This week saw the addition of the very first version of a KControl module for Decibel configuration. For now it just displays accounts known to Decibel.

Phonon moved up in the world by getting its first import of a new GStreamer backend.

Well, that's about all the goodies. There were lots of less glamorous developments as well. You can read the full digest here if you're interested in all the details.

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