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today's leftovers

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  • Securing and Hardening Linux and Unix Endpoints Against Cyber Attack: Part IV

    How Secure are your Linux Endpoints? An Ethical Hacker’s Guide to Securing and Hardening Linux and Unix Endpoints

  • Henri Sivonen: A Look at Encoding Detection and Encoding Menu Telemetry from Firefox 86

    The failure mode of decoding according to the wrong encoding is very different for the Latin script and for non-Latin scripts. Also, there are historical differences in UTF-8 adoption and encoding labeling in different language contexts. For example, UTF-8 adoption happened sooner for the Arabic script and for Vietnamese while Web developers in Poland and Japan had different attitudes towards encoding labeling early on. For this reason, it’s not enough to look at the global aggregation of data alone.

    Since Firefox’s encoding behavior no longer depends on the UI locale and a substantial number of users use the en-US localization in non-U.S. contexts, I use geographic location rather than the UI locale as a proxy for the legacy encoding family of the Web content primary being read.

    The geographical breakdown of telemetry is presented in the tables by ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 code. The code is deduced from the source IP addresses of the telemetry submissions at the time of ingestion after which the IP address itself is discarded. As another point relevant to make about privacy, the measurements below referring to the .jp, .in, and .lk TLDs is not an indication of URL collection. The split into four coarse categories, .jp, .in+.lk, other ccTLD, and non-ccTLD, was done on the client side as a side effect of these four TLD categories getting technically different detection treatment: .jp has a dedicated detector, .in and .lk don’t run detection at all, for other ccTLDs the TLD is one signal taken into account, and for other TLDs the detection is based on the content only. (It’s imaginable that there could be regional differences in how willing users are to participate in telemetry collection, but I don’t know if there actually are regional differences.)

  • Puppy Linux without an initrd

    We know about the 'initrd' file, which is an initramfs that runs first at bootup. EasyOS has this, as do the puppies.
    A traditional full installation, occupying an entire partition, may not need an initrd, and can be run directly from the kernel boot parameters. For example, if the full installation is in /dev/sda9, then boot parameters would include root=/dev/sda9, or the PARTUID could be specified.
    If an initrd is used, the boot parameters would not have root=, instead would have something like initrd=initrd.gz, where initrd.gz is the name of the file, with perhaps a path.
    One of the reasons we have a initrd is to setup the layered filesystem, using overlayfs or aufs, then a switch_root is performed onto the layered filesystem.
    However, Dima, forum name 'dimkr' on github and the Puppy Forum, and 'iguleder' on the old Puppy Murga Forum, has come up with a way to load the layered filesystem without requiring an initrd.

  • Losca: MotionPhoto / MicroVideo File Formats on Pixel Phones

    Google Pixel phones support what they call ”Motion Photo” which is essentially a photo with a short video clip attached to it. They are quite nice since they bring the moment alive, especially as the capturing of the video starts a small moment before the shutter button is pressed. For most viewing programs they simply show as static JPEG photos, but there is more to the files.

  • Containerize all the things! Arm v9 takes security seriously

    The key concept introduced in Arm v9's new Confidential Compute Architecture is the realm. Realms are containerized, isolated execution environments, completely opaque to both operating system and hypervisor. The hypervisor itself will only be responsible for scheduling and resource allocation. Realms themselves are to be managed by the realm manager—a new concept that can apparently be implemented in 1/10th the code required for a hypervisor.

  • Arm pulls the sheets off its latest Armv9 architecture with added AI support, Realms software isolation

    Arm has set out its stall for the first major new version of its instruction set architecture – Armv9 – in about a decade, and promised compatible chips will have improved machine-learning and security capabilities.

    Previous versions of the architecture introduced support for things like virtualization and SIMD; the last major update, Armv8, debuted in 2011. Arm says its latest instruction set architecture, v9, will be geared toward today's top buzzword in tech – AI. The chip design house, which Nvidia is still trying to acquire from Softbank, laid on the marketing a little thick for the unveiling of the ISA, though there is some detail here.

  • Armv9 architecture to focus on AI, security, and “specialized compute”

    Armv8 was announced in October 2011 as the first 64-bit architecture from Arm. while keeping compatibility with 32-bit Armv7 code. Since then we’ve seen plenty of Armv8 cores from the energy-efficient Cortex-A35 to the powerful Cortex-X1 core, as long as some custom cores from Arm partners.

    But Arm has now announced the first new architecture in nearly ten years with Armv9 which builds upon Armv8 but adds blocks for artificial intelligence, security, and “specialized compute” which are basically hardware accelerators or instructions optimized for specific tasks.

  • SiFive Core IP 21G1 release improves bit manipulation, floating-point unit, reduces code footprint

    As SiFive has a portfolio of RISC-V cores ranging from low-power E2-series to high-performance U8-series cores with performance similar to Cortex-A7x cores, the company has not released new cores for a while, and instead focuses on improving their current RISC-V cores.

More in Tux Machines

Audio/Videos: Ubuntu Kylin, Hideo Kojima, and More

today's howtos

  • Check and better order your photos on Kodi with these changes | ITIGIC - TechStony

    When we hear the name of Kodi, the first thing that comes to mind is a complete multimedia center for playing videos and music . However, this program goes much further and allows us to manage and reproduce other content such as television channels or photos. Precisely in these same lines we want to focus on this last element that we comment on, that is, in the management and visualization of images. This is something that we can directly carry out from this program without the need for additional ones. With this, what we want to tell you is that, as with video or audio content, photographic files can also be managed from here. As with the rest of the file types, when we start working with Kodi the first thing we have to do is create our photo library or libraries. From there, the application itself will already know the disk locations where we have these contents stored for later management. This is something that is surely familiar to us if we have already used it with videos or audios. In fact, below, we are going to show you a series of changes that we recommend you do to improve the viewing experience of these own photos.

  • Install Nexus Repository Manager on Debian 11 - kifarunix.com

    This tutorial describes how to install Nexus repository manager on Debian 11. Nexus is the World’s #1 repository manager for build artifacts.

  • Sync WM wallpaper with LightDM on Linux Mint :: Rafael Cavalcanti

    Linux Mint uses LightDM GTK greeter for the login screen. It tries to show each user’s wallpaper, and it works well if you stick to the default Cinnamon desktop environment. However, I use a standalone window manager (dwm) and my wallpaper is set by Nitrogen. This breaks the feature, unless we take some steps.

  • How to get useful answers to your questions

    5 years ago I wrote a post called how to ask good questions. I still really like that post, but it’s missing a few of the tactics I use to get useful answers like “interrupt people when they’re going off on an irrelevant tangent”.

  • How To Install Yarn on AlmaLinux 8 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Yarn on AlmaLinux 8. For those of you who didn’t know, YARN an acronym for Yet Another Resource Navigator is a fast, stable, and reliable Javascript package manager which is compatible with npm ( Node Package Manager). Yarn helps with the management of npm packages which includes installation, updating, configuration, and removal of packages. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step installation of Yarn Package Manager on an AlmaLinux 8. You can follow the same instructions for CentOS and Rocky Linux.

  • How to Install Anbox to Run Android Apps in Ubuntu 20.04, Ubuntu 21.10 | UbuntuHandbook

    Want to run Android apps in Linux? Here’s how to do it using the Anbox container in Ubuntu 20.04 and Ubuntu 21.10. Anbox, Anbox in a box, is a free and open-source software that runs the full Android system in a container, abstracts hardware access and integrates core system services into a GNU/Linux system. There’s another solution “Waydroid” to do the similar things in Linux. It’s said to have better performance, though it requires Wayland session. For those stick to Xorg, here’s how to install and use Anbox.

  • How to Install Deno JavaScript Runtime on Ubuntu 20.04

    Deno is a lightweight JavaScript runtime that is both straightforward and safe. It provides a stable and comfortable development environment, allowing you to write TypeScript without transpilation. In addition, as an engine with V8 as the base, it has high compatibility with existing JavaScript code written with full support for ECMAScript standards. We'll show you how to install Deno on Ubuntu 20.04 and run a hello world script to test your installation in this article.

  • How to Install GCC Compiler Collection on CentOS 8 and Rocky Linux 8 – VITUX

    The GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) is a compiler software package with a collection of compilers for several languages. It is free and open-source software, which means that everyone has the opportunity to contribute or modify the application according to their own needs. GCC supports various programming languages, including C, C++, Objective-C, Fortran, Java and Ada. It also provides libraries such as libstdc++ for C++ and libgcj for Java. GCC uses a technology called “Recursive Descent Parsing”, which is very effective at finding errors in the code. GCC also provides a rich set of warnings that can be used to spot possible problems or bugs that may not have been detectable by the compiler itself. GCC performs some optimizations on both the intermediate code and the final machine code, but it does not perform as many optimizations as a commercial compiler would.

  • Bash Conditional Statements - OSTechNix

    In this guide, we will learn the usage of conditional statements in Bash scripting with examples. Decision-making is an important step in programming. There may be a situation where certain conditions have to be met and based upon that you have to write some logic. This is what a conditional statement does. The conditional statements allows you to write logic and take decisions. The concept that you read here will be the same for all the programming languages out there but with syntactic and implementation difference.

  • 7 handy tricks for using the Linux wget command

    Wget is a free utility to download files from the web. It gets data from the Internet and saves it to a file or displays it in your terminal. This is literally also what web browsers do, such as Firefox or Chromium, except by default, they render the information in a graphical window and usually require a user to be actively controlling them. The wget utility is designed to be non-interactive, meaning you can script or schedule wget to download files whether you're at your computer or not.

Raspberry Pi Tablet Gets Radio Surgical Enhancement

We always get excited when we buy a new tablet. But after a few months, it usually winds up at the bottom of a pile of papers on the credenza, a victim of not being as powerful as our desktop computers and not being as convenient as our phones. However, if you don’t mind a thick tablet, you can get the RasPad enclosure to fit around your own Raspberry Pi so it can be used as a tablet. Honestly, we weren’t that impressed until we saw [RTL-SDR] add an SDR dongle inside the case, making it a very portable Raspberry Pi SDR platform. The box is a little interesting by itself, although be warned it costs over $200. For that price you get an LCD and driver board, a battery system, speakers, and an SD extension slot with some control buttons for volume and brightness. There’s a video of the whole setup (in German) below. Read more Also: What limitations does the Raspberry Pi have?

Android Leftovers