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Snapshots of KDE_3.4rc1

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In response to the many emails begging for my screenshots, I finally have them posted. Being too anxious to wait for gentoo's ebuilds, I downloaded the sources last night and began the build.

I must say that was the easiest build (next to the gentoo ebuilds, if that counts) I've ever done. In the past I'd have dependency issues and weird errors to google and fix. Many times I never got a complete set to compile. Konstruct has even presented problems from time to time. But this time I ./configure'd, make'd, and make install'd them right on here. I think that says something wonderful for the kde development team right there!

And omg is it gorgeous!? Now I've seen some beautiful desktops in my time. People do such creative things with all the window managers, it's just amazing. Drop by the gentoo forum and peruse the "monthy" screenshot threads sometime. But kde has outdone themselves this release. The default is absolutely the prettiest desktop I've come across. It took me just a few minutes to get some customizations in place that look fairly killer. I've just begun to play, but wanted to get some shots posted.

Now to the nitty gritty: functionality and bugs. well, I haven't had any problems yet, but I'm still in the first day. However it seems stable, responsive and fully functional. One of the cutest features is the smileys in kmail. I'll report back in about a week, but I think if you've been waiting for final or at least a more mature beta, you should go for it. I'm gonna delete my backup of beta2 now. Big Grin

My Screenshots. Default at the beginning and some customized towards the end.

Oh, I should add...

that the ogg system sounds are now fully functional as well.

You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?


Nice screenshots, guess I'll start working on rpms for pclinuxos tomorrow. Big Grin

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