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Linux Again Kicked To The Curb

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Linux
Google

My daily Slashdot newsletter told me all I needed to know in one simple headline: Google Desktop For Mac Released.

Honestly, I didn't want to click the link. I knew what was going to happen. I've been there...I've seen me do it. 4:30AM is way too early to go from first-cup-of-coffee to pissed-off in 3.7 seconds. I couldn't help myself. I clicked the link.
I beat my old time by a full three tenths of a second.

Hence, I am beating on this keyboard with the voracity of a man killing a swarm of fire ants. Killing the ants would have been more productive. At least my ant jihad would have produced a body count. All this is going to do is provide a target for Google
Apologists.

That's fine. You may commence fire.

In October of 2005 I wrote the article sited above and again referenced here. Google - What Have You Done For Us Lately? From what I can see, not much has changed...except the date. Linux is still the means by which Google became one of the richest and most successful corporations in American History. Google remains a leader in Internet Technology and Innovation. Linux is still the backbone of the largest server farm in private enterprise. It would seem that Larry Page and Sergey Brin would have the common courtesy to acknowledge this little detail by providing the Linux Desktop with a decent desktop search tool. You would think.

No...but they found the time and resources to do it for Mac.

Full Story.

Indeed!

A long time ago, when no Google software was available for GNU/Linux, I spoke to Chris DiBona, who promised to do something about it. Since then, Google Earth and Picassa have been ported to GNU/Linux, but not much beyond it.

Susan, I'm 100% with you on that one. Google cannot argue that they haven't the resources. But like most companies, their topmost obligation is to their investors, not to the community they come from. They seem to address the demand from Linux users, rather than help it. Google Code and SoC don't cut it. Come on, Google. Do more already and help us help /you/.

By the way, you may have noticed that I don't proofread my messages, so if my comments on your site seem sloppy, then it's just because I type as quickly as I speak.

Oh, it's not original content

Item modified, I now notice...

re: not original content

schestowitz wrote:

Item modified, I now notice...

yeah, sorry, I goofed up. No one mentioned that I forgot the link, so your post brought it to my attention.

No, Helios' opinions are much more boldly expressed than my own. Big Grin

Helios

Yeah, Ken Stark has a certain style... the first few sentences read made me think it was a characteristic misfit. You seem to be calm.

re: Helios

Yeah, he's a little scrapper ain't he? Big Grin

Indy

His new NASCAR gig is quite intersting, but I'm not a believer in it. Maybe the hype around trying to reach the unreachable target will gain us some attention. Smile

Ken is very passionate about Linux. With a past in the military he's truly the GNU/Linux warrior. So are you, of course, but you probably wouldn't get as emotional/aggressive over it.

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