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Most Newbie Friendly

PCLOS
34% (385 votes)
*ubuntu
26% (293 votes)
openSUSE
13% (145 votes)
Mandriva
6% (70 votes)
Elive
1% (8 votes)
SimplyMepis
9% (105 votes)
FreeSpire
2% (27 votes)
Xandros
3% (29 votes)
Sabayon
1% (14 votes)
Other
5% (56 votes)
Total votes: 1132

Freespire

Freespire is another contender. All multimedia support (and much more) out of the box.

http://onlineapps.newsvine.com/

Ubuntu is a great distro

Ubuntu is a great distro make no mistake about it, but why does its users try to convince everyone its "Newbie Friendly" when its not. I'm willing to bet that Ubuntu has chased more newbie's back to M$ than its captured.

Quote:
If you want a
"buntu" that meets the standard then its Mepis or Mint.

Well I can agree on that, because its true.

PCLOS, FreeSpire, Xandros, openSUSE, MEPIS, Linux Mint are "Newbie Friendly". Why is Sabayon on that list ? Does someone think Newbie's will fall in love with emerge Big Grin

re: ubuntu is a great distro

have you ever used anything other than ubuntu? --yeah, guessed so!

re: Sabayon

FastGame wrote:

Why is Sabayon on that list ? Does someone think Newbie's will fall in love with emerge Big Grin

That was supposed to be my "Cowboy Neil" response. Big Grin

Okie Dokie

srlinuxx wrote:
FastGame wrote:
Why is Sabayon on that list ? Does someone think Newbie's will fall in love with emerge Big Grin

That was supposed to be my "Cowboy Neil" response. Big Grin

Big Grin I understand Wink

Guess there wouldn't be much argument that Sabayon is the most Newbie friendly Gentoo Smile

Newbies...

I take newbie-friendly to mean the easiest way to get your questions about the OS answered. I do not believe anyone (except for the super-geeky) learn everything about their OS on their own. There's always a setting, feature, or general question that you consult someone or something else to learn. That's why I believe that Windows has always and will always be the most newbie friendly OS. Followed closely by Mac OS and their fanatical following. Of the Linux distros we all love, I believe Ubuntu would be the most newbie friendly because of the community that follows it. True, it's not set to go "out of the box", but it's very easy to find info on Automatix, EasyUbuntu or several other ways to get the system working the way you want it to. No distro is ever going to be perfect for you when you install it, but the ease of discovering how to make it perfect is what makes it "newbie-friendly." IMO

re: Newbies...

buttonmasher wrote:

I take newbie-friendly to mean the easiest way to get your questions about the OS answered.

If that was the criteria, I should have put Gentoo on there. I never ... well, maybe once, but I never asked a question on the gentoo forum and not get an answer.

Actually rarely did I have to ask, cuz if one searches, it's probably been answered before.

I agree that the community surrounding a distro is important tho, and perhaps it is a factor. This may be why pclos and ubuntu are in the lead. They both have great communities and easy to use forums.

A good point buttonmasher..

No doubt the tremendous popularity of the Buntus has created a very large and diverse community. I often find answers to my Linux questions there even though they may not be Buntu specific. I would have to disagree with you though with respect to Windows and Microsoft. I do not sense anything like the "community" us users of Linux experience, whether it be PCLinuxOS, Mepis, Kubuntu or Slack. ( My favs in that order.) Perhaps it is because I have been removed from the world of Windows the last 5 years, voluntarily, and never really had to solve any problems.

Rich D.

How is it that Ubuntu is newbie friendly if it...

Requires further configuration to get multimedia going. Multimedia online and otherwise is the make or break point, and distros that don't work out of the box, by no means, are newbie friendly. If you want a
"buntu" that meets the standard then its Mepis or Mint.

EOS

Rich D.

i voted for pclinuxos

user friendly-ness is not a real issue for linux experts, so i don't mind if opensuse is not on top, but it probably should be, xandros comes next, but i'd hate to compare user friendness to merely being close to windows' interface, which is what seems to be the trend around here. i didn't vote for ubuntu though, it's not as stable as pclinuxos (= less friendly)

re: i voted for pclinuxos

Well, I consider newbie-friendly configuring most if not all hardware and settings automagically, including an intuitive stack of graphical applications available in the menu, and an easy to understand hard drive installer.

Windows ain't so newbie-friendly if you ask me. I can't do much of anything in it! Big Grin

re: i voted for pclinuxos

I agree, Windows ain't so newbie-friendly.

When I think about newbie friendly I only consider how complete and intuitive the OS is after installation. How many newbies have installed Windows? Nil. If Windows came in the box on CDs, newbies couldn't install it either. So we're all doing Linux of any flavor a disservice to be constantly harping on "how difficult it is to install." In my opinion, installation problems are irrelevant and should be considered something for a technician or seller to handle.

This is also why, in my opinion, that until manufacturers sell systems with Linux installed, it will never become mainstream. And it shouldn't. We should not be turning Linux into Windows to draw the masses. Let those that are curious and capable discover it and join the community like the rest of us did.

Now back to the vote, I also voted for PCLinuxOS because it is a very complete OS with everything at your fingertips to make the transition from WinXP to Linux painless.

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