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Fedora Linux 34 Officially Released with GNOME 40, Linux Kernel 5.11, and More

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Linux

The first biggest change in the Fedora Linux 34 release is, of course, the inclusion of the latest and greatest GNOME 40 desktop environment in the Fedora Workstation edition. This change alone brings many changes to the way Fedora Workstation looks and feel due to the Activities Overview redesign of the GNOME 40 release.

Fedora Linux will now start in the Overview mode after login. Due to this change, the GNOME Welcome Tour app has been adapted to the new design for an integrated and cohesive look, according to the Fedora Project, but this change will probably only affect newcomers, not those who will upgrade from Fedora Linux 33.

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Fedora 34 Released: Phoronix, Original and More

  • Fedora 34 Released As A Hugely Exciting Update For This Linux Distribution

    It's Fedora 34 day! Fedora 34 is now officially available and it's quite exciting on the feature front especially with the changes to be enjoyed in Fedora Workstation 34.

    Fedora 34 has successfully managed to switch over to PipeWire from PulseAudio for its audio needs, Fedora Workstation 34 continues making use of Btrfs as the default file-system while now has enabled Zstd-based transparent file-system compression by default, systemd-oomd is being used for handling out-of-memory / memory pressure situations, toolchain upgrades with GCC 11 / Binutils 2.35 / Glibc 2.33 / LLVM 12 are exciting for developers and those with newer processors, and Wayland by default for the Fedora KDE Plasma desktop version, and HarfBuzz has been enabled in FreeType for better looking font rendering. XWayland is also in better shape with Fedora 34 thanks to using the standalone XWayland build.

  • Fedora Linux 34 is officially here!

    Today, I’m excited to share the results of the hard work of thousands of contributors to the Fedora Project: our latest release, Fedora Linux 34, is here! I know a lot of you have been waiting… I’ve seen more “is it out yet???” anticipation on social media and forums than I can remember for any previous release. So, if you want, wait no longer — upgrade now or go to Get Fedora to download an install image. Or, if you’d like to learn more first, read on.

    The first thing you might notice is our beautiful new logo. Developed by the Fedora Design Team with input from the wider community, this new logo solves a lot of the technical problems with our old logo while keeping its Fedoraness. Stay tuned for new Fedora swag featuring the new design!

  • Fedora Community Blog: The Fedora Podcast is back! But it needs your help

    The Fedora Marketing team is bringing back the Fedora Podcast. We have two main people working on it currently: Eduard (x3mboy) and me (Grayson/computerkid). That has been working great to get things rolling but there is plenty to do and. We need to bring in more of the community After all, Fedora is Friends and we need help from our friends! We also want to have a diverse group of folks involved in the Fedora Podcast project.

Fedora Linux 34 Now Generally Available

  • Fedora Linux 34 Now Generally Available

    The Fedora Project, a Red Hat, Inc. sponsored and community-driven open source collaboration, today announced the general availability of Fedora Linux 34, the latest version of the fully open source Fedora operating system. Fedora Linux 34 further improves the overall user experience with key updates like GNOME 40, while still providing a foundation for new use cases, like edge computing, with improved support for hardware watchdogs for automated system recovery.

What’s new in Fedora Workstation 34

  • What’s new in Fedora Workstation 34

    Fedora Workstation 34 is the latest version of our leading-edge operating system and this time there are major improvements heading your way. Best of all, you can download it from the official website. What’s new, I hear you ask!? Well let’s get to it.

3 more articles about Fedora release

  • Fedora Linux 34 released

    The Fedora 34 release is now available. "This release features GNOME 40, the next step in focused, distraction-free computing. GNOME 40 brings improvements to navigation whether you use a trackpad, a keyboard, or a mouse. The app grid and settings have been redesigned to make interaction more intuitive." LWN recently reviewed the Fedora 34 Workstation release.

  • Fedora 34 Released With GNOME 40 And Wayland By Default

    Fedora Linux 34 is one of the major releases in Fedora’s history and a bold one. The Fedora Project’s emphasis on delivering the latest open source updates with all levels of users in mind, from beginners to experts.

    Fedora team announced the Fedora 34 release across workstations, spins, and servers. The latest version on this popular Linux distribution comes with Linux Kernel 5.11 which brings support for the latest hardware across processors, graphics cards, ports, and other devices.

    [...]

    Btrfs has been the default filesystem for Fedora Workstations since Fedora 33, but the Fedora Project team has done one better in Fedora 34. In this release, the zstd compression is made as default when using Btrfs. This compression will be essential for increasing read and write performance of larger files, with the potential to speed up related workflows.

    Fedora 34 has successfully managed to switch over to PipeWire from PulseAudio for its audio needs. Overall, PipeWire is more secure and offers a better audio experience in Fedora 34 than with PulseAudio sound daemon, which was the default in previous Fedora releases.

  • Fedora 34 Releases with GNOME 40, Linux Kernel 5.11, and a New i3 Spin

    After the release of the Fedora 34 beta a week ago, Fedora 34 stable release is finally here with exciting changes and improvements.

    As expected this release of Fedora arrives with the latest Linux kernel 5.11 along with significant changes such as Gnome 40, PipeWire, availability of a Fedora i3 Spin, and various other changes.

    Let’s take a look at the important changes coming to Fedora 34.

    [...]

    One of the biggest highlights is the arrival of the GNOME 40 desktop. Fedora 34 is one of the few distributions in which you can experience the latest Gnome 40 right now. So, this change is worth noting.

    Taking a look at KDE Plasma, Wayland becomes the default display server for KDE Plasma in Fedora 34. Moreover, KDE Plasma Desktop image is available for AArch64 ARM devices as well.

IBM 'community' posturing

  • F34 elections nominations now open

    Candidates may self-nominate. If you nominate someone else, please check with them to ensure that they are willing to be nominated before submitting their name.

    The steering bodies are currently selecting interview questions for the candidates.

    Nominees submit their questionnaire answers via a private Pagure issue. The Election Wrangler or their backup will publish the interviews to the Community Blog before the start of the voting period. Fedora Podcast episodes will be recorded and published as well.

    Please note that the interview is mandatory for all nominees. Nominees not having their interview ready by end of the Interview period (2021-05-19) will be disqualified and removed from the election.

Hidden Features of Fedora 34 | LINUX Unplugged 403

  • Hidden Features of Fedora 34 | LINUX Unplugged 403

    The new release of Fedora has more under the hood than you might know. It's a technology-packed release, and nearly all of it is coming to a distro near you.

    Plus the questions we think the University of Minnesota kernel ban raises, and more.

Looking forward to Fedora 34

  • Looking forward to Fedora 34

    The Fedora project may have managed to shake off its reputation for delayed releases in recent years, but that hasn't stopped the release date for Fedora 34 from slipping one week to April 27. Modulo a handful of bugs, though, this release is in its final form, so a look at what is coming is warranted. Distribution releases, especially those for fast-moving community distributions, are a good point at which to catch up with the state of many free-software projects and where Linux is headed in general. Fedora 34 includes a lot of changes, including the GNOME 40 release but, for the most part, it looks like an exercise in continuity.
    Incidentally, your editor has been made aware that we are all supposed to call the distribution "Fedora Linux" now, with the bare name "Fedora" reserved for the project. So this article should properly be talking about "Fedora Linux 34", but old habits die hard.

    Like many distributors, Fedora makes it easy to beta-test its upcoming releases so, on a whim, your editor decided to update his system and see what was coming; what could possibly go wrong? The target Thinkpad, which nicely came with Fedora pre-installed by the manufacturer, was just sitting there waiting for this sort of opportunity. As expected, the upgrade went smoothly and the laptop booted up in the new system without any obvious hitches.

Fedora 34 overview | Welcome to Freedom.

Fedora Linux 34 has landed, and it's an exquisite take on

  • Fedora Linux 34 has landed, and it's an exquisite take on the desktop

    When last I wrote about Fedora 34, the desktop operating system was still in beta. I tested that beta and found it to be a remarkable step forward for Fedora Linux. I called it a game-changer. Why? Let me count the ways.

    First, there's GNOME 40, which turns this particular open-source desktop workflow into a thing of beauty. Although I already felt GNOME had a pretty decent workflow, everything changes with this latest iteration. Switching from the vertical to horizontal layout might seem like a small change, but it's quite profound in how well it ups the efficiency of the desktop. Everything just makes sense now; so much so that I keep asking myself, "Why didn't the GNOME developers do this all along?"

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