Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Fedora Linux 34 Officially Released with GNOME 40, Linux Kernel 5.11, and More

Filed under
Linux

The first biggest change in the Fedora Linux 34 release is, of course, the inclusion of the latest and greatest GNOME 40 desktop environment in the Fedora Workstation edition. This change alone brings many changes to the way Fedora Workstation looks and feel due to the Activities Overview redesign of the GNOME 40 release.

Fedora Linux will now start in the Overview mode after login. Due to this change, the GNOME Welcome Tour app has been adapted to the new design for an integrated and cohesive look, according to the Fedora Project, but this change will probably only affect newcomers, not those who will upgrade from Fedora Linux 33.

Read more

Fedora 34 Released: Phoronix, Original and More

  • Fedora 34 Released As A Hugely Exciting Update For This Linux Distribution

    It's Fedora 34 day! Fedora 34 is now officially available and it's quite exciting on the feature front especially with the changes to be enjoyed in Fedora Workstation 34.

    Fedora 34 has successfully managed to switch over to PipeWire from PulseAudio for its audio needs, Fedora Workstation 34 continues making use of Btrfs as the default file-system while now has enabled Zstd-based transparent file-system compression by default, systemd-oomd is being used for handling out-of-memory / memory pressure situations, toolchain upgrades with GCC 11 / Binutils 2.35 / Glibc 2.33 / LLVM 12 are exciting for developers and those with newer processors, and Wayland by default for the Fedora KDE Plasma desktop version, and HarfBuzz has been enabled in FreeType for better looking font rendering. XWayland is also in better shape with Fedora 34 thanks to using the standalone XWayland build.

  • Fedora Linux 34 is officially here!

    Today, I’m excited to share the results of the hard work of thousands of contributors to the Fedora Project: our latest release, Fedora Linux 34, is here! I know a lot of you have been waiting… I’ve seen more “is it out yet???” anticipation on social media and forums than I can remember for any previous release. So, if you want, wait no longer — upgrade now or go to Get Fedora to download an install image. Or, if you’d like to learn more first, read on.

    The first thing you might notice is our beautiful new logo. Developed by the Fedora Design Team with input from the wider community, this new logo solves a lot of the technical problems with our old logo while keeping its Fedoraness. Stay tuned for new Fedora swag featuring the new design!

  • Fedora Community Blog: The Fedora Podcast is back! But it needs your help

    The Fedora Marketing team is bringing back the Fedora Podcast. We have two main people working on it currently: Eduard (x3mboy) and me (Grayson/computerkid). That has been working great to get things rolling but there is plenty to do and. We need to bring in more of the community After all, Fedora is Friends and we need help from our friends! We also want to have a diverse group of folks involved in the Fedora Podcast project.

Fedora Linux 34 Now Generally Available

  • Fedora Linux 34 Now Generally Available

    The Fedora Project, a Red Hat, Inc. sponsored and community-driven open source collaboration, today announced the general availability of Fedora Linux 34, the latest version of the fully open source Fedora operating system. Fedora Linux 34 further improves the overall user experience with key updates like GNOME 40, while still providing a foundation for new use cases, like edge computing, with improved support for hardware watchdogs for automated system recovery.

What’s new in Fedora Workstation 34

  • What’s new in Fedora Workstation 34

    Fedora Workstation 34 is the latest version of our leading-edge operating system and this time there are major improvements heading your way. Best of all, you can download it from the official website. What’s new, I hear you ask!? Well let’s get to it.

3 more articles about Fedora release

  • Fedora Linux 34 released

    The Fedora 34 release is now available. "This release features GNOME 40, the next step in focused, distraction-free computing. GNOME 40 brings improvements to navigation whether you use a trackpad, a keyboard, or a mouse. The app grid and settings have been redesigned to make interaction more intuitive." LWN recently reviewed the Fedora 34 Workstation release.

  • Fedora 34 Released With GNOME 40 And Wayland By Default

    Fedora Linux 34 is one of the major releases in Fedora’s history and a bold one. The Fedora Project’s emphasis on delivering the latest open source updates with all levels of users in mind, from beginners to experts.

    Fedora team announced the Fedora 34 release across workstations, spins, and servers. The latest version on this popular Linux distribution comes with Linux Kernel 5.11 which brings support for the latest hardware across processors, graphics cards, ports, and other devices.

    [...]

    Btrfs has been the default filesystem for Fedora Workstations since Fedora 33, but the Fedora Project team has done one better in Fedora 34. In this release, the zstd compression is made as default when using Btrfs. This compression will be essential for increasing read and write performance of larger files, with the potential to speed up related workflows.

    Fedora 34 has successfully managed to switch over to PipeWire from PulseAudio for its audio needs. Overall, PipeWire is more secure and offers a better audio experience in Fedora 34 than with PulseAudio sound daemon, which was the default in previous Fedora releases.

  • Fedora 34 Releases with GNOME 40, Linux Kernel 5.11, and a New i3 Spin

    After the release of the Fedora 34 beta a week ago, Fedora 34 stable release is finally here with exciting changes and improvements.

    As expected this release of Fedora arrives with the latest Linux kernel 5.11 along with significant changes such as Gnome 40, PipeWire, availability of a Fedora i3 Spin, and various other changes.

    Let’s take a look at the important changes coming to Fedora 34.

    [...]

    One of the biggest highlights is the arrival of the GNOME 40 desktop. Fedora 34 is one of the few distributions in which you can experience the latest Gnome 40 right now. So, this change is worth noting.

    Taking a look at KDE Plasma, Wayland becomes the default display server for KDE Plasma in Fedora 34. Moreover, KDE Plasma Desktop image is available for AArch64 ARM devices as well.

IBM 'community' posturing

  • F34 elections nominations now open

    Candidates may self-nominate. If you nominate someone else, please check with them to ensure that they are willing to be nominated before submitting their name.

    The steering bodies are currently selecting interview questions for the candidates.

    Nominees submit their questionnaire answers via a private Pagure issue. The Election Wrangler or their backup will publish the interviews to the Community Blog before the start of the voting period. Fedora Podcast episodes will be recorded and published as well.

    Please note that the interview is mandatory for all nominees. Nominees not having their interview ready by end of the Interview period (2021-05-19) will be disqualified and removed from the election.

Hidden Features of Fedora 34 | LINUX Unplugged 403

  • Hidden Features of Fedora 34 | LINUX Unplugged 403

    The new release of Fedora has more under the hood than you might know. It's a technology-packed release, and nearly all of it is coming to a distro near you.

    Plus the questions we think the University of Minnesota kernel ban raises, and more.

Looking forward to Fedora 34

  • Looking forward to Fedora 34

    The Fedora project may have managed to shake off its reputation for delayed releases in recent years, but that hasn't stopped the release date for Fedora 34 from slipping one week to April 27. Modulo a handful of bugs, though, this release is in its final form, so a look at what is coming is warranted. Distribution releases, especially those for fast-moving community distributions, are a good point at which to catch up with the state of many free-software projects and where Linux is headed in general. Fedora 34 includes a lot of changes, including the GNOME 40 release but, for the most part, it looks like an exercise in continuity.
    Incidentally, your editor has been made aware that we are all supposed to call the distribution "Fedora Linux" now, with the bare name "Fedora" reserved for the project. So this article should properly be talking about "Fedora Linux 34", but old habits die hard.

    Like many distributors, Fedora makes it easy to beta-test its upcoming releases so, on a whim, your editor decided to update his system and see what was coming; what could possibly go wrong? The target Thinkpad, which nicely came with Fedora pre-installed by the manufacturer, was just sitting there waiting for this sort of opportunity. As expected, the upgrade went smoothly and the laptop booted up in the new system without any obvious hitches.

Fedora 34 overview | Welcome to Freedom.

Fedora Linux 34 has landed, and it's an exquisite take on

  • Fedora Linux 34 has landed, and it's an exquisite take on the desktop

    When last I wrote about Fedora 34, the desktop operating system was still in beta. I tested that beta and found it to be a remarkable step forward for Fedora Linux. I called it a game-changer. Why? Let me count the ways.

    First, there's GNOME 40, which turns this particular open-source desktop workflow into a thing of beauty. Although I already felt GNOME had a pretty decent workflow, everything changes with this latest iteration. Switching from the vertical to horizontal layout might seem like a small change, but it's quite profound in how well it ups the efficiency of the desktop. Everything just makes sense now; so much so that I keep asking myself, "Why didn't the GNOME developers do this all along?"

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

C/C++ Programming/Development

  • How to pass a struct to a function in C

    A structure has been widely used as a user-defined data type in the C language. The purpose of using structures in C is to create a single data type that would be used further to group various data type variables or elements into one type. The structure has been used as a global variable so all the functions can access it easily. This means it can’t be declared in the main method so that we can use it anywhere.

  • C++ String Reverse

    If the string, “vwxyz“, is reproduced in the new order as, “zyxwv“. Then the string has been reversed. Unfortunately, such direct reversibility is not possible in C++. However, there is a classical workaround for reversing a string in C++. Keep reading this article to know-how. A string can be created in two main ways in C++. A string can be created as a constant pointer to a sequence of characters. A string can also be created by instantiating a string object from the string class. This article deals with string objects instantiated from the string class. This means the string library has to be included in order to execute the code samples in this article. A string object is a data structure where the string literal is a list. Each character is of one element in the list. And so, a literal string can be handled like an array of elements. This article explains the classical workaround to reverse a string in C++. This essentially iterates the string literal, backward. Having a summary knowledge of forward iteration enables the reader to understand reverse iteration better. This article deals with string objects instantiated from the string class.

  • C++ String starts with

    There comes a time when the programmer has to know what a string starts with. This knowledge can be used to choose or eliminate items in a list of characters. So, a programmer may want to know if a string starts with a particular character or with a particular sub-string. A programmer can write code that will check the initial characters of a string, one-by-one, and compare that with a prefix sub-string. However, all the strategies involved have already been done by the C++ string library. The C++ string class of the string library has the member function, starts_with(). This does the work for the programmer, but the programmer needs to know how to use the function. And that is why this tutorial is being produced. There are three variants of the string starts_with() member function. Variants of the same function are called overloaded functions. The basic approach for the start_with() member function is to compare a short independent sub-string with the first short segment of the string in question. If they are the same, then the function returns true. If they are different, the function returns false.

  • Function Overloading in C

    Function overloading is a very well-known concept used in object-oriented languages having many functions with the same name and different parameters in a single code. The object-oriented programming languages which support function overloading include Java and C++. As the C compiler doesn’t allow it to be used in the code hence, it isn’t easy to implement function overloading in C. Yet; we can still achieve the same thing with some technique. Let’s start this article with the opening of the shell terminal of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.

PineTime Smartwatch and Good Code Play Bad Apple

PineTime is the open smartwatch from our friends at Pine64. [TT-392] wanted to prove the hardware can play a full-motion music video, and they are correct, to a point. When you watch the video below, you should notice the monochromatic animation maintaining a healthy framerate, and there lies all the hard work. Without any modifications, video would top out at approximately eight frames per second. To convert an MP4, you need to break it down into images, which will strip out the sound. Next, you load them into the Linux-only video processor, which looks for clusters of pixels that need changing and ignores the static ones. Relevant pixel selection takes some of the load off the data running to the display and boosts the fps since you don’t waste time reminding it that a block of black pixels should stay the way they are. Lastly, the process will compress everything to fit it into the watch’s onboard memory. Even though it is a few minutes of black and white pictures, compiling can take a couple of hours. Read more

today's howtos

  • How to play Dungeon Defenders on Linux

    Dungeon Defenders is a hybrid multiplayer video game developed by Trendy Entertainment. The game was released on Microsoft Windows, Xbox, iOS, Mac OS, Linux, etc. Here’s how to play the game on Linux.

  • How to play Company of Heroes on Linux

    Company of Heroes is a real-time strategy game developed by Relic Entertainment. The game takes place during WWII and was released on Windows, OS X, iOS, Android, and Linux. Here’s how you can play Company of Heroes on your Linux PC.

  • How to Install TeamViewer on Ubuntu Linux

    TeamViewer is a popular cross-platform tool that allows a user to remotely access and control another user’s computer in an easy and secure way. File sharing, remote desktop control and web conferencing between computers are all possible using TeamViewer. TeamViewer is useful for providing remote customer support in organizations, collaborating with colleagues who are far away, and connecting to your own device remotely. This article will walk you through the process of installing TeamViewer on Ubuntu systems.

  • How to Upgrade Ubuntu 21.04 to 21.10 Impish Indri

    Ubuntu has officially released the Ubuntu 21.10 codenamed Impish Indri. This has seen the introduction of GNOME 40 as the default desktop, and sadly GNOME 41 did not make the final cut. The release also introduces Linux Kernel 5.13 among new applications and other back-end performance improvements.

  • How to Extract Tar Bz2 File in Linux - ByteXD

    In this tutorial, we will be showing you how to use tar command to extract tar.bz2 files. Tar stands for tape archive, and it is one of the most used commands that deals with compressed archive files. Bz2 stands for bzip2. It is a specific compression algorithm. The tar command comes pre-installed in most Linux distributions. The tar utility is used to compress and extract files using different algorithms. Tar supports a wide array of compression algorithms such as gzip, bzip2, xz, lzip, etc.

  • How to mount ISO in Kubuntu Linux - Darryl Dias

    Dolphin file manager in Kubuntu (Tested this in Kubuntu 21.04) does not ship with Mount ISO option in the right click menu, but with the help of the dolphin-plugins package we can add this and many other features.

  • Setup OpenWRT on BPi-R2 | Zamir's Board

    It’s pretty easy to get OpenWRT start and running on BPi-R2. However, I realized that I need to extend the root filesystem to the whole disk, which is where the struggling starts.

GNOME Gingerblue 2.0.0 Recording Software supports XSPF 1.0

GNOME Gingerblue 2.0.0 is Free Recording Software for GNOME. In the 2.0.0 release I have added support for XSPF 1.0 from Xiph.org. Read more Also: Free Software Review: Balena Etcher couldn’t be easier for writing ISO images, but do they really need telemetry? – BaronHK's Rants