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Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • A brief overview of the Container Network Interface (CNI) in Kubernetes | Enable Sysadmin

    If you have worked with Kubernetes (K8s) and tried to learn some of its inner workings, either on the job or in a training course, you must have learned a bit about Container Network Interface (CNI). This article de-mystifies what CNI means and does.

  • Announcing Dates & CfP for Nest with Fedora

    As we celebrate Fedora Linux 34 with the upcoming Release Party, we are also looking forward to our next event: Nest with Fedora. As I mentioned in my last update, the 2021 edition of our annual contributor conference will again be virtual. I am happy to announce the dates for this year’s contributor conference: August 5th-8th, 2021. The Fedora Project has been thriving, and I am sure that this years event will be full of exciting content.

  • Fedora 34 Reviewed: A Great GNOME distro that's worth checking out!

    I had a chance to check out Fedora 34 recently, and was impressed by the overall quality of the GNOME desktop and its implementation. There are a few rough edges, but overall, it's a great distribution. In this video, I talk about the highlights and what makes it stand out.

  • Fedora Linux 34 available for download

    Woo-hoo! Today is officially the day many of us have been waiting for. Yes, Fedora Linux 34 is finally available for download. For many Linux users, Fedora is considered the best overall operating system to be based on that open source kernel. The distro focuses on truly free and open source software -- a pure Linux experience. It is also fairly bleeding edge, but at the same time, it remains stable for everyday use.

    What makes Fedora 34 so exciting? Well, this version of the Linux-based operating system uses GNOME 40 as its default desktop environment, and version 40 is the most electrifying version of GNOME in years. GNOME 40 is notable for a horizontal workspace switcher and having the Dash (favorites launcher) moved to the bottom of the screen. Despite being released last week, Ubuntu 21.04 fails to comes with this version of GNOME.

  • The most popular Fedora Linux in years rolls out | ZDNet

    Red Hat's community Linux distribution Fedora has always been popular with open-source and Linux developers, but this latest release, Fedora 34 seems to be something special. As Matthew Miller, Fedora Project Leader, tweeted, "The beta for F34 was one of the most popular ever, with twice as many systems showing up in my stats as typical."

  • Recapping day two of Red Hat Summit Virtual Experience 2021

    It seems like just yesterday we were planning for Red Hat Summit 2021, and now the two days of our April Summit programming have just flown by. Let's take a quick look back at what happened. And, if you missed something, don't worry! Much of the Summit programming is still available on demand for you to watch at your convenience.

  • Red Hat boss on Linus Torvalds: 'He's changed the world' | ZDNet

    Red Hat CEO Paul Cormier has continued his regional virtual tour this week, sharing with media in the Asia Pacific region on Thursday his thoughts on what the work Linus Torvalds has done over the last 30 years means for the world.

    "Oh, my gosh, where do you start?," he began.

    "I mean, he's changed the world. Just his vision of an open operating system."

    It's not just the operating system that came out of it, Cormier said.

    "That was the very beginning. Even when we got started with Linux 20-plus years ago, it really wasn't -- it was for hobbyists, but what Linus did was really show the world that open was a better way to develop new innovation," the CEO said. "And I think where Red Hat took it from there, from an enterprise perspective, we showed the world that we really could run critical enterprise workloads on open source-developed software."

More in Tux Machines

pgAdmin 4 v6.1 Released

The pgAdmin Development Team is pleased to announce pgAdmin 4 version 6.1. This release of pgAdmin 4 includes 30 bug fixes and new features. For more details please see the release notes. pgAdmin is the leading Open Source graphical management tool for PostgreSQL. For more information, please see the website. Read more Also: pgexporter 0.2.0

today's leftovers

  • GPL Had Better be a Contract

    Software Freedom Conservancy announced today that they are suing Vizio, which makes TVs, for violations of GPLv2 and LGPLv2.1. Their website has a copy of a signed complaint, the legal document you file with a court to get a lawsuit started.

    Upshot: It looks like SFC’s suing for breach of contract. They’re claiming explicitly that GPLv2 and LGPLv2.1 are contracts, that Vizio breached those contracts, and that they should be held accountable under contract law.

    The main remedy SFC requests—the thing they’re asking the court to do for them—is to order Vizio to give them full corresponding source code, as agreed under GPLv2 and LGPLv2.1. That’s called “specific performance”. It’s a remedy under contract law. Not property law or intellectual property law, like copyright law.

  • Open access switch picks up pace in Australia and New Zealand

    Australian and New Zealand universities have notched up open access deals with two major academic publishers inside a week after Springer Nature unveiled a “transformative agreement” with the Council of Australian University Librarians (Caul).

    The three-year “read and publish” arrangement covers the article processing charges that authors normally pay to move their work in front of paywalls. Researchers will be able to make their articles freely accessible if they are accepted for publication in more than 2,000 journals, provided that their universities subscribe to those journals.

  • OK Lenovo, we need to talk!

    I’ve been wanting to publicly comment on Lenovo’s statement on Linux support for a while, as there’s much to say about it, and my failing attempt at finding a suitable replacement for my venerable T510 gave me an excuse to document my love-hate relationship with Lenovo all at once.

    This is of course my own personal views and ideas, and does not reflect the Haiku project’s position on the topic, nor that of Haiku, Inc. But I feel they deserve to be brought here due to history and the direct and indirect effect it might have had on the project, including previous failed attempts at commercial applications using it.

    While Lenovo is still above many other manufacturers on some aspects, and on others domains, well, nobody does any better anyway, they purport to perpetuating the IBM legacy, so I think (sic) they should be held up to the standard they claim to follow. Yet the discussion about repair and documentation pertains to almost every vendor.

  • sh(1): make it the default shell for the root user

    This changes also simplifies making tiny freebsd images with only sh(1) as a shell

  • #13 It begins…

    Update on what happened across the GNOME project in the week from October 01 to October 08.

  • CUDA-Python Reaches "GA" With NVIDIA CUDA 11.5 Release, __int128 Preview

    NVIDIA has made available CUDA 11.5 today as the latest version of their popular but proprietary compute stack/platform. Notable with CUDA 11.5 is that CUDA-Python has reached general availability status. NVIDIA CUDA 11.5 was posted today along with updated device drivers for Windows and Linux systems. Some of the CUDA 11.5 highlights include:

  • AMD GPU Driver Looks To Make Use Of Intel's New Buddy Allocator Code In The Linux Kernel - Phoronix

    Thanks to the nature of open-source, AMD engineers for the "AMDGPU" kernel graphics driver are looking to make use of Intel's new i915 buddy allocator code they introduced as part of all their video memory management changes as part of their discrete graphics bring-up. As part of Intel's bring-up of device local memory support for their dedicated GPU enablement and adding the notion of memory regions and other changes, they added a buddy allocator implementation for allocating video memory. This is an implementation of the well known buddy system for dividing of memory into equal parts (buddies) and continuing equal splitting that until able to satisfy the memory request.

Programming Leftovers

  • Ruby Lands "YJIT" As A Speedy, In-Process JIT Compiler - Phoronix

    YJIT is a JIT compiler for Ruby that leverages the lazy Basic Block Versioning (LBBV) architecture. YJIT has been in the works for a number of years. Most exciting for end-users and developers is that YJIT yields an average speed-up of around 23% compared to the current CRuby interpreter for realistic benchmarks.

  • Release: rebuilderd v0.15.0

    rebuilderd 0.15.0 very recently released, this is a short intro into what it is, how it works and how to build our own integrations!

  • Eclipse OpenJ9 0.29 Released With Full AArch64 Linux Support, More Mature JITServer Tech

    The newest feature release to Eclipse OpenJ9 is now available, the high performance Java Virtual Machine originating from IBM J9. Eclipse OpenJ9 v0.29 was released today, one day after the GraalVM 21.3 release and one month after the OpenJDK 17 debut. But in the case of OpenJ9 v0.29 it continues to target just OpenJDK 8 and OpenJDK 11.

Security, Entrapment (Microsoft GitHub), and Microsoft FUD